Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123
Results 51 to 69 of 69
  1. #51
    Member
    Bettyboo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Last Online
    Today @ 03:59 PM
    Location
    Bangkok
    Posts
    32,247
    ^ he both spouts and sprouts, and yes it is painful to listen to.

    Quote Originally Posted by CSFFan View Post
    Fluent, hardly any accent. It's obvious he's studied abroad.



    I was very poor when I first arrived. When I moved to Satit Ramkhamhaeng, a couple of the intern supervisors took me under their wings and I had to improve or get shit canned. Over the years, they taught me a lot about how to manage a classroom and how to deliver a lesson and motivate students to speak.

    I'd say after about three years, I was good at the classroom side of things but my test writing was abominable due to lack of decent examples. It wasn't till about 5 years ago that I was forced to learn to write a proper standards based test using Bloom's Taxonomy.

    Class planning, assessment management and classroom management strategies are things that should be stressed in training for every new teacher.
    That's a fair assessment; it also took me about 3 years before I was teaching at a decent level - and that was with good support, ongoing training and certification through a strong UK university MA course. A big problem is that many TEFLers simply don't improve due to no support/training and/or them believing that they know better, don't need training because they are a native speaker and/or have teaching or TEFL qualification. Imagine somebody of the mentality of Cyrille, do you really believe they're capable of consistently improving and developing their skillset? Folks like him who think they know it all very often make terrible teachers. Cryille might be great, indifferent or terrible, I simply don't know, but I'd suggest over 75% of TEFLers in Thailand, Middle East and Korea are poor.

    Personality is also important, some folks just can't empathise with students or do much more than prescriptively go through a textbook or the same notes they've used for years; they are simply in the wrong trade, but would find it difficult to get other employment.
    How do I post these pictures???

  2. #52
    Thailand Expat cyrille's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Last Online
    @
    Posts
    18,788
    Quote Originally Posted by Bettyboo View Post
    (1)I'd suggest over 75% of TEFLers in Thailand, Middle East and Korea are poor.

    (2)Personality is also important, some folks just can't empathise with students or do much more than prescriptively go through a textbook or the same notes they've used for years; they are simply in the wrong trade, but (3)would find it difficult to get other employment.

    Let's have a look at these three claims.

    1)I'd suggest that this is an example of how you consistently show a tendency to extrapolate hugely from your very imited experience.

    2) Doubtless it is true that personality is important. For the rest, see above. How many ESL lessons have you witnessed? How many times have you seen the certification of teachers who claim to be CELTA qualified? I concede that Korean education in particular seems to be chock-a-block with charlatans and bullshitters. This is also true of the 'lower end' in Thailand. I've been working on the Middle East for over a decade. It pays better and does not share this characteristic. Have you ever even been here?

    3) Pure speculation.

    You know absolutely nothing about my 'mentality','skillset' or attitude to professional development.

    For my part, I've concluded you're a complete twat, vain misogynist and utter waster, and have grave doubts about how well you do your job too. However you're cagey about what you do and so aren't dogged by silly accusations like this. This is probably a rare example of wisdom on your part.

  3. #53
    Thailand Expat
    Chico's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2016
    Last Online
    Today @ 05:54 PM
    Location
    I'm Dead
    Posts
    5,130
    Hmm wasn't betty working in a BKK uni?

    whilst the squirrel works where?

  4. #54
    Member
    Bettyboo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Last Online
    Today @ 03:59 PM
    Location
    Bangkok
    Posts
    32,247
    ^ in Thailand, I worked at Chula, Mahidol and Silpakorn - about 10 years in total.

    Quote Originally Posted by cyrille View Post
    Let's have a look at these three claims.

    2) Doubtless it is true that personality is important. For the rest, see above. How many ESL lessons have you witnessed? How many times have you seen the certification of teachers who claim to be CELTA qualified? I concede that Korean education in particular seems to be chock-a-block with charlatans and bullshitters. This is also true of the 'lower end' in Thailand. I've been working on the Middle East for over a decade. It pays better and does not share this characteristic. Have you ever even been here?
    Last year, I had 80+ TEFLers in a uni language institute under my "guidance", and yes I had details on all their specific certifications and had to be involved in observations/training, as well as writing the syllabuses (6 levels), tests and marking rubrics across 4 semesters. Before that, in Oman, I only had 20 or so that I monitored/designed courses and tests for, etc. Before that, in sunny Thailand, I did observations and was on the hiring committee, but we only had a handful of teachers. How many EFL lessons have I observed, errm, more than I wish to count, many...

    I've got a lot more experience than you just suggested; over 15 years in universities. Plus, we have student feedback rankings for our 80+ teachers at my current uni - guess who comes top, time after time?

    But, my MA in Applied Linguistics and ELT from Nottingham University is a really good qualification, I was lucky to have studied there. The standard CELTA, TEFL certificates and TESOL MAs are terrible for developing skills to teach EFL at Thai/Korean/Middle East universities; they are more suited to teaching ESL Academic English courses at American/UK universities.

    FYI, I earn plenty more in South Korea than most in the Middle East. &, the standard of teaching in the ME is awful, absolutely awful, textbook to test prescriptive rubbish, by and large, equally as bad as in Korean universities (perhaps even worse).

    BTW, I've never "witnessed an ESL lesson"; the statement alone suggests your knowledge level...
    How do I post these pictures???

  5. #55
    Custom Title Changer
    Topper's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Last Online
    Today @ 04:51 PM
    Location
    Bangkok
    Posts
    8,728
    Quote Originally Posted by Bettyboo View Post
    but I'd suggest over 75% of TEFLers in Thailand, Middle East and Korea are poor.

    Personality is also important, some folks just can't empathise with students or do much more than prescriptively go through a textbook or the same notes they've used for years; they are simply in the wrong trade, but would find it difficult to get other employment.
    LOL, I call it "next page lesson planning", where all that is done is teach the next page in the book, without any thought about how the lesson should be delivered in a manner that reaches the students. Culturally, most western teachers don't understand the teacher/student relationship, Thai style, where the teacher is almost like a second parent.

    Quote Originally Posted by cyrille View Post
    How many ESL lessons have you witnessed? How many times have you seen the certification of teachers who claim to be CELTA qualified?
    I've observed probably around 70-80 lessons over the last few years from teachers that have claimed to have a PhD at the ripe age of 24 to teachers that have legitimate masters degrees in English or linguistics. My general opinion is qualifications don't really mean much if the teacher can't engage the students in a lesson. At one school I worked at, they hired a PhD (legit) that had a speaking impediment to teach English. Amazing......
    "I was a good student. I comprehend very well, OK, better than I think almost anybody," - President Trump comparing his legal knowledge to a Federal judge.

  6. #56
    Member
    Bettyboo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Last Online
    Today @ 03:59 PM
    Location
    Bangkok
    Posts
    32,247
    ^ the PhD teachers are interesting. Education is always good, and so a PhD should be a good qualification in any field. But, due to the detached research based focus of a PhD, it doesn't directly support being a good EFL teacher. Maybe a third of our current 80+ teachers have PhDs, and some are good teachers, but most are not, and I'd suggest that a PhD offers very little to an EFL teacher; a good MA or celta/delta while done with EFL class reflection seem much more useful. &, yes, to empathise with students, understand needs and objectives then be creative with developing lessons that engage the students and foreground transferable skills development is more important than qualifications. Although, to achieve good lessons usually requires some pedagogical knowledge, especially when in a program of classes/study.

    For the sake of standardisation and consistency, we give teachers a course book and teaching objectives that support materials can be found in the textbooks, but we tell teachers that you really don't wanna be doing more than say 20-30% from the textbook, chosen to support an objectives orientated teaching approach focused on student needs, every class is different, so the teacher has to find/develop the relevant content. But still, 25% of teachers ask if they can just teach page by page from the textbook... In the Middle East, the vast majority of courses were just textbook page by page - depressingly bad.
    Last edited by Bettyboo; 20-02-2020 at 03:21 PM.
    How do I post these pictures???

  7. #57
    Thailand Expat

    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Last Online
    Today @ 05:25 PM
    Posts
    13,958
    Quote Originally Posted by Bettyboo View Post
    I'm reporting directly what the students told me, and that was 8 years ago, mostly getting jobs with Emirates; none worked for Thai based airlines, all of them were based in the Middle East. But, as usual, you claim to know more than the people actually involved...

    So, I clicked on Google and the first answer was this:



    In Thai baht, that's just over 80,000 Thai baht per month, exactly as the students told me.

    You Mr Sausage are an unpleasant and ignorant individual, full of dishonesty, an over-inflated ego and endlessly sprouting false information.
    You dozy clot, you were referring to Thai uni grads earning corn from Thai airlines not Emirates.

    You really are a wee, sleaked little twerp, ain't you.

  8. #58
    Member
    Bettyboo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Last Online
    Today @ 03:59 PM
    Location
    Bangkok
    Posts
    32,247
    ^ no I was not. I never mentioned Thai airlines, and I've never known a Thai student to work for a Thai airline.

    Presumption, Mr Sausage, is the Mouther of All Fukups... (Even if it's just a ruse to detract from your, once again..., faulty information...)
    How do I post these pictures???

  9. #59
    Thailand Expat

    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Last Online
    Today @ 05:25 PM
    Posts
    13,958
    Bollocks, I caught you out talking bollocks and nailed you for it.

    Take it like a man and quit your hysterical squirming.

  10. #60
    Thailand Expat cyrille's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Last Online
    @
    Posts
    18,788
    Quote Originally Posted by CSFFan View Post
    My general opinion is qualifications don't really mean much if the teacher can't engage the students in a lesson. At one school I worked at, they hired a PhD (legit) that had a speaking impediment to teach English.
    I generally agree about qualifications that do not include practicums, despite holding a Master's myself.

    Far more meaningful are courses such as the CELTA, Diploma etc., both of which I hold, since this training includes observed lessons and candidates are assessed on aspects such as student engagement, rapport etc.

    Unfortunately, due to the salaries on offer, probably fewer than 5% of foreign ESL teachers in Thailand hold these qualifications. However a clear and valid qualifications pathway does exist. Fact is most ESL teachers are at the very start of this pathway and those who progress down it do so because they plan to look for work outside Thailand.

    Thanks for the meaningful input anyway, a welcome change from that flabby-necked clown who considers himself somehow qualified to sit in judgement.

  11. #61
    Member
    Bettyboo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Last Online
    Today @ 03:59 PM
    Location
    Bangkok
    Posts
    32,247
    ^ & ^^

    The sooner you two repulsive creatures just go, the better; you drag every thread down...
    How do I post these pictures???

  12. #62
    Hansum Man! panama hat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Last Online
    Today @ 05:54 PM
    Location
    Way, Way South of the border now - thank God!
    Posts
    20,749
    Quote Originally Posted by Bettyboo View Post
    ^ & ^^

    The sooner you two repulsive creatures just go, the better; you drag every thread down...
    I was apprehensive about looking up to see if I was one of them . . .

    Nope, all good (another Kiwi-ism)
    Quote Originally Posted by Chico View Post
    Upto until the 70's Australians referred to themselves as Pom's.
    Quote Originally Posted by Chico View Post
    Just asking the supposed teacher if he is a teacher,as anything more than ten syllables and he's fucked.

  13. #63
    Thailand Expat

    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Last Online
    Today @ 05:25 PM
    Posts
    13,958
    Poor old Battyboob, doesn't he just hate it when his drivel is debunked for the rubbish it generally transpires to be. Remember the days when he foretold a revolutionary uprising in Thailand and got all hot and sweaty in his red shirt.

    Ah well. Must get one down living in Korea as an eccentric oddity.

  14. #64
    Thailand Expat cyrille's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Last Online
    @
    Posts
    18,788
    He's so far up his own arse that he should consider renting out his lower intestine on air bnb.

  15. #65
    Thailand Expat
    Mandaloopy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2017
    Last Online
    Today @ 05:54 PM
    Location
    ᠮᠣᠩᠭᠣᠯ ᠤᠯᠤᠰ
    Posts
    2,394
    My TEFL was bloody useless and my first year of teaching was a disaster upon reflection. Luckily for me my school enrolled me in professional development programs with observed practice in the second year, it certainly made me a better teacher. I found that my M.Ed opens doors but has not had massive impact on my practice, but the schools it allows me to teach at have. 3/4 of the way through may PGCEi, I've enjoyed the reading at it has made me more reflective on my own practice, I'd recommend it. The online platform makes fitting it around work pretty easy and moodle is much better than it was back in the day.

    Teachers I would be concerned about are ones who make a decision not to do any professional development.

  16. #66
    Thailand Expat
    sabang's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Last Online
    Today @ 05:55 PM
    Location
    BackinOz
    Posts
    31,318
    I wouldn't be that bothered about your 'professional qualifications' now that Los says it's hiring. They will still be shit jobs with shit wages, managed by buffoons. The only decent English teacher I personally knew in Ubon quit in disgust (or maybe got quitted) because he dared to ask questions, and thus was at constant loggerheads with the inept bureaucrats. It's no different in the RTA- are the coupmeisters the best most professional soldiers, or those that come from connected families? Now, what about the Thai public service generally- a real meritocracy, e'hh? So no surprise they are Yellow shirt, to the core.

    If you fail to answer correctly, or don't know the answer then sure- enjoy Thai TEFLing. Or are you really there to advance your career?

  17. #67
    Thailand Expat

    Join Date
    Aug 2017
    Last Online
    Today @ 09:17 AM
    Location
    Sumatra
    Posts
    4,116
    Thai kids will never learn English because the curriculum and bureaucracy does not allow teachers to confirm assimilation of prior inputs, and insists on auto pass systems.
    Perfect for idiots like Chico who are naive and gullible enough to press the system buttons for 15k a month

    Confirm previous teaching has been assimilated by all students before moving forward. The Thai system would never allow this.

    If the students are really unlucky, they will leave with just minor inflections of their teachers stupidity.

  18. #68
    Thailand Expat cyrille's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Last Online
    @
    Posts
    18,788
    Quote Originally Posted by Switch View Post
    If the students are really unlucky, they will leave with just minor inflections of their teachers stupidity.
    It's clear you're trying to seem well educated due to the subject matter of this thread, chas, but that unfortunately makes absolutely no sense whatsoever.



    I suggest you take a break from whatever it is you are consuming.

    INFLECTION | meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary

  19. #69
    Thailand Expat

    Join Date
    Aug 2017
    Last Online
    Today @ 09:17 AM
    Location
    Sumatra
    Posts
    4,116
    Quote Originally Posted by cyrille View Post
    It's clear you're trying to seem well educated due to the subject matter of this thread, chas, but that unfortunately makes absolutely no sense whatsoever.



    I suggest you take a break from whatever it is you are consuming.

    INFLECTION | meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary
    You seem to enjoy being deliberately stupid. Why am I not surprised.
    Do you never confirm what you have been teaching, or do you work with Saudi guide dogs?

Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •