Results 1 to 22 of 22
  1. #1
    Thailand Expat misskit's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Last Online
    @
    Location
    Chiang Mai
    Posts
    31,113

    As PM2.5 Levels Rise Thai Government Considers Personal Cars Ban

    Thailands government is ug whether to impose a ban on personal car use in areas affected with high levels of hazardous PM2.5 dust particles. Above all if levels exceed 100 micrograms per cubic meter (g/m), twice the safety level.


    The harsh proposal unveiled by Prime Minister Prayut Chan-o-cha after a mobile cabinet meeting in Narathiwat.

    The prime minister said only public transport services will be allowed to use the roads during a ban.


    Is that what we want? Do we really have to go that far? asked Gen Prayut.

    However, the ban would only be employed on a case-by-case basis to avoid an unnecessarily negative impact.

    He said the government is ready to step in with such measures when PM2.5 levels exceed the National safe limit.

    If the dust levels rise to more than 100 g/m, his government step in Gen Prayut said.

    He was responding to questions on 2 major issues; tougher measures to deal with sources of particulate matter 2.5 micrometers or less in diameter (PM2.5); and accusations that it hasnt done enough to deal with the problem.


    The PM also offered an explanation as to who is doing what in the current fight to contain the problem.
    Stepping up screening for sources of PM2.5 particles

    As PM2.5 levels tend to be around 50 g/m, considered the highest allowable level in Thailand. All concerned agencies begin stepping up screening for sources of the dust. Including vehicles emitting black smoke, he said.


    In areas where the PM2.5 levels rise to between 50 and 75 g/m, provincial governors are responsible for targeting the key sources of the pollution, said the PM.


    Traffic emissions are the primary source of PM2.5. Followed by biomass burning and industrial emissions, said Gen Prayut.


    In areas where the PM2.5 levels rise to between 75 and 100 g/m the provincial governor will have to implement more stringent measures such as prohibiting heavy trucks from entering certain inner areas of the province on at certain times, he said.


    And in the event the PM2.5 levels exceed 100 g/m, the government will then take control and may implement even more stringent regulations, which may affect everyone, according to the PM.


    He said, the government has begun working on a long-term master plan to combat pollution. It includes the development of the electric rail network; and also replacing diesel-powered public buses with electric ones.


    Polluting private cars and trucks next target

    Natural Resources and Environment Minister Varawut Silpa-archa, meanwhile, hinted that if measures against lorries emitting black smoke prove to be insufficient, personal cars could be targeted next.


    It has been found that 72% of the PM2.5 dust particles come from traffic emissions, he said.


    Among the short-term measures to be implemented next in Bangkok is a ban on heavy trucks from entering certain parts of the city every other day, possibly in February only, he said.


    In another development, Bangkok governor Aswin Kwanmuang on Tuesday signed an order to shut 437 schools in Bangkok today due to a forecast of higher dust levels.


    As of 6pm on Tuesday, PM2.5 ranged from 71 to 86 g/m in several areas of Bangkok, while the highest level nationally was 99 g/m in tambon Na Phralan in Chaloem Phrakiat district of Saraburi, according to the Pollution Control Department.


    Source: Bangkok Post

  2. #2
    disturbance in the Turnip baldrick's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Last Online
    Today @ 02:45 AM
    Location
    Heidleberg
    Posts
    22,194
    a vehicle free day in bangkok would be funny as fcuk

  3. #3
    'ello 'ello 'ello Luigi's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2014
    Last Online
    @
    Location
    Abuja
    Posts
    26,389
    How about seriously banning crop burning nationwide under the threat of land confiscation?

  4. #4
    Thailand Expat jabir's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2016
    Last Online
    @
    Posts
    10,150
    According to the report, 100 micrograms per cubic meter (g/m) is already twice the safety level.

    Anyone hazard a guess at the number of g/m when a bus or songtaew kicks down to blanket everything in black smoke for the next 100m?

    Our glorious leaders might be more motivated to save lives by travelling around town on mosais instead of cavalcades.

  5. #5
    Thailand Expat jabir's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2016
    Last Online
    @
    Posts
    10,150
    Quote Originally Posted by Luigi View Post
    How about seriously banning crop burning nationwide under the threat of land confiscation?
    Another thread mentioned that the gov actually owns all farm land (or rice land?), which fits in nicely with your proposal.

    Thing is, all plans work well on paper, but there's so much money to be made in land confiscation that the well maintained corruption machine would kick in to fire off another round of poverty and injustice for the masses.

  6. #6
    Thailand Expat
    kmart's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Last Online
    Yesterday @ 04:34 PM
    Location
    Rayong.
    Posts
    11,290
    Banishing 50yo trucks,(BMA) buses, and those wankers that have their pickups 'modified' to emit huge plumes of black filth everywhere might be an easier fix.?

    Getting people to stop burning shit seems to be impossible here.

  7. #7
    Thailand Expat
    Klondyke's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Last Online
    Yesterday @ 10:48 PM
    Posts
    6,503
    Quote Originally Posted by baldrick View Post
    a vehicle free day in bangkok would be funny as fcuk
    It would be interesting to know how much it's influenced. When seeing the figures in provinces without much traffic, it's also quite high.
    Anyway, there are big differences within 2- 3 days, depending on the weather conditions.

  8. #8
    Thailand Expat

    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Last Online
    Yesterday @ 11:15 PM
    Posts
    14,019
    It's a third world country so nothing substantive will be done to address the problem in any manner worthy of consideration..

    The priorities are obvious to any sane intelligent civilised person:-

    Ban the practice of crop clearance by burning on pain of imprisonment and forfeiture of land.

    No commercial vehicle older than 12 years permitted a licence, to include omnibuses, trucks and taxis.

    All private vehicles older than three years to pass emission/safety checks at government approved centres with a penalty for corruption of imprisonment and forfeiture of the vehicle.

    Ban all street vending involving the preparation of hot food.

    Introduce a congestion zone for central BKK with pre-registration and ANPR technology to penalise abuse with a sanction of licence withdrawal.

    But this place is neither sane nor responsible so none of these will be implemented.

  9. #9
    Member
    harrybarracuda's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Last Online
    Today @ 02:45 AM
    Posts
    64,744
    Quote Originally Posted by kmart View Post
    Banishing 50yo trucks,(BMA) buses, and those wankers that have their pickups 'modified' to emit huge plumes of black filth everywhere might be an easier fix.?
    They're already having a "crackdown" on those. Again.


    Land Transport Department inspects trucks and buses emitting black smoke

  10. #10
    Thailand Expat Airportwo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Last Online
    Today @ 01:57 AM
    Location
    Flat Earth
    Posts
    3,775
    Quote Originally Posted by Luigi View Post
    How about seriously banning crop burning nationwide under the threat of land confiscation?
    Just ban the buying of burnt cane and tell the good old boys at the "Thailand Cane & Sugar Corporation" (TCSC) to have some ethics in their business!
    Helicopter gunships to patrol the rice fields.
    Solved!

  11. #11
    The Fool on the Hill bowie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
    Last Online
    @
    Location
    นนทบุรี
    Posts
    5,046
    Just did a vehicle run Bangkok to Chiang Mai - the floating haze was along for the whole ride.

    I figured two hours out of Bangkok it would lessen - wrong. Three hours out it seemed to lighten up but only for an hour or two. Granted, visual isn't a perfect metric but...

    Anyway, along the way saw many small fires, most not cane burning. Saw a lot of burned out areas along the roads in many places. An Immeasurable number of belching vehicles of all shapes and sizes. Not to mention the acrid burning stench that emanates from all those cooking pots in use everywhere every day.

    Many, many, many contributing factors. Good luck identifying the primary culprits. And, good luck enacting and enforcing provisions to provide a positive direction.

  12. #12
    Thailand Expat terry57's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Last Online
    30-03-2020 @ 06:03 PM
    Posts
    26,725
    Completely normal response from the talking chiken heads.

    Ban the cars but leave the busses and trucks belching black smoke, the farmers burning their shit off and silly somchai the retard burning other chiken heads he don't like.

    Lieland is funny as fook innit.

  13. #13
    Days Work Done! Norton's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Last Online
    @
    Location
    Roiet
    Posts
    30,851
    Whenever you find yourself on the side of the majority, it is time to pause and reflect.

  14. #14
    ความรู้ลึกลับ HuangLao's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2017
    Last Online
    @
    Location
    สุโขทัย
    Posts
    7,660
    Quote Originally Posted by Norton View Post

    Patience.
    Nature's working on that as we speak.


  15. #15
    Thailand Expat
    Klondyke's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Last Online
    Yesterday @ 10:48 PM
    Posts
    6,503
    Not always pollution is to be blamed. The problem happens also in the "clean" EU cities during high summer - then, completely banning traffic in cities. Something about that:

    Inversion (meteorology)

    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    In meteorology, an inversion, also known as a temperature inversion, is a deviation from the normal change of an atmospheric property with altitude. It almost always refers to an inversion of the thermal lapse rate. Normally, air temperature decreases with an increase in altitude. During an inversion, warmer air is held above cooler air; the normal temperature profile with altitude is inverted. [2]

    Read more
    Inversion (meteorology) - Wikipedia

  16. #16
    Thailand Expat
    Dragonfly's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2015
    Last Online
    Today @ 01:20 AM
    Posts
    13,933
    glad I don't live in that polluted place anymore,

    I feel for the poor expats stuck there,

  17. #17
    Thailand Expat misskit's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Last Online
    @
    Location
    Chiang Mai
    Posts
    31,113
    Gov’t to enforce 12 air pollution reduction measures

    BANGKOK (NNT) - The government will be enforcing 12 measures addressing the air pollution crisis. The Prime Minister said the government has not been negligent over the issue, however the solution to this problem must be done step-by-step and receive cooperation from all sectors.


    Prime Minister Gen Prayut Chan-o-cha has revealed the government’s plans to address air pollution will cover short-term actions and long-term solutions, tailored to the conditions in each area. These measures will be enforced based on the severity of air pollution at the time, starting with general measures for when PM 2.5 airborne dust is measured below 50 micrograms per cubic meter.


    Special measures and regulations will be enforced by provincial governors once the dust level is measured from 51 to 75 micrograms per cubic meter. Whenever the dust level reaches 76 to 100 micrograms per cubic meter, traffic restrictions will be imposed to reduce exhaust emissions. Drastic measures, such as the ban on all private vehicles, or only for those older than 10 years, may be enforced should the dust level exceed 100 micrograms per cubic meter.


    The Cabinet, in its mobile meeting, has agreed in principle to 12 air pollution reduction measures. These will be further discussed in a meeting chaired by Deputy Prime Minister Gen Prawit Wongsuwan. The 12 measures consist of

    1. The extension of lorry-free zones in Bangkok, from Ratchadaphisek ring road to the outer Kanchanapisek ring road.

    2. The ban on all lorries from entering central Bangkok on odd-numbered days in January and February this year.

    3. Exhaust checks on all non-scheduled passenger vehicles, by increasing inspection units to 50, serving 50 districts of Bangkok.

    4. Exhaust checks on all passenger and cargo vehicles to prohibit those emitting excessive pollution.

    5. The inspection of factories and the issuance of maintenance orders or prohibitions at factories emitting excessive
    pollution.


    6. Regulation of metro line construction sites, as well as other projects, to ensure compliance with pollution control regulations and proper traffic management.


    7. The ban on outdoor burning in Bangkok and neighbouring provinces, as well as penalties for violators.


    8. The authorization of provincial offices and local administration to regulate outdoor burning, vehicles, factories and construction sites during the polluted period.


    9. The discount for fuel products containing less than 10 ppm sulphur, which emit fewer airborne particles after combustion.


    10. Campaigns discouraging the use of private vehicles, and mandatory black smoke inspection for all vehicles owned by government employees.


    11. Campaigns encouraging engine oil changes for diesel engines older than 5 years to help reduce particle emissions.


    12. Campaigns raising public awareness and understanding of the air pollution issue.




    http://thainews.prd.go.th/en/news/de...00123114015661

  18. #18
    Thailand Expat misskit's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Last Online
    @
    Location
    Chiang Mai
    Posts
    31,113
    Public Health Minister joins anti-PM2.5 campaign in Lumpini Park

    BANGKOK (NNT) - Deputy Prime Minister and Public Health Minister, Anutin Charnvirakul, today led a group of public health officials to Lumpini Park in Bangkok to distribute PM2.5 filtering masks to members of the public. Mr. Anutin said the government is taking all necessary steps to deal with outdoor burning as well as industrial and vehicle emissions.


    At the King Rama VI Monument in Lumpini Park today (Jan 22), Mr. Anutin together with the public health officials took part in a campaign to build awareness of PM2.5 dust particles and self-protection against air pollution. They distributed protective masks to municipal officials, police officers and street sweepers in Lumpini Park and Wattana and Pathum Wan districts, as their jobs require them to work outdoors.


    The Deputy Prime Minister said the government can’t solve this issue alone. It needs cooperation from all sides to reduce activities that create air pollution and implement protective measures. A meeting of the cabinet ministers yesterday considered a proposal for people to work from home and students to study online to reduce vehicle emissions, improve the health of state employees and save utility costs and other expenses affecting private firms.


    Mr. Anutin encouraged the general public to look after themselves. If they have to exercise, they should avoid outdoor exercises. According to a Chinese study, people can work out by simply swinging their arms.


    Another PM2.5 reduction measure is to change the working hours of civil servants at the Bangkok City Hall and Thani Noppharat Building to between 10 a.m. and 6 p.m. Their previous working hours were from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. This will help ease traffic congestion during rush hours between 6 a.m. and 9 a.m. and between 4 p.m. and 7 p.m. The measure will be lifted until the air quality improves. The Bangkok Metropolitan Administration (BMA) has encouraged other agencies to adjust their working hours during this period.


    http://thainews.prd.go.th/en/news/de...00123112729654

  19. #19
    Thailand Expat terry57's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Last Online
    30-03-2020 @ 06:03 PM
    Posts
    26,725
    So as per usual The head Chicken heads are gunna bring in all these new regulations to combat Air pollution.

    If ya really believe they will follow that through ya more fooked up than them.

    Dumb fooks cannot manage to tackle the horrific road toll let along tackle the air pollution that is killing all the little chickens.

  20. #20
    The Familyman Dillinger's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Last Online
    @
    Posts
    31,895
    Quote Originally Posted by terry57 View Post
    Ban the cars but leave the busses and trucks belching black smoke
    Yup and you are gonna need a lot more of those old buses on the roads to ferry around those on the car ban.

    Amazing Thailand

  21. #21
    Thailand Expat terry57's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Last Online
    30-03-2020 @ 06:03 PM
    Posts
    26,725
    It's true innit, nothing will fokin change eh.


    Silly fookers.

  22. #22
    Thailand Expat
    Farang Ky Ay's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Last Online
    07-04-2020 @ 07:17 PM
    Location
    Chiang Mai
    Posts
    1,887
    Just coming back from Mae Hong Son area, and saw 4/5 forest fires in Hot area (rd 108) most of them along the road with seemingly multiple starting points.

    Temperature inversion vmay be at work as it felt warmer in the mountains than here in CM.

    Agree with others, black smoke belching buses, lorries and pick-up trucks, older cars, should be the priority, pollution checks with heavy penalties when tampered with would be efficient in many countries but here...I also agree with tackling the burning activities, authorities should stop with the lame excuses ("they do it at night". .FFS a burnt field is noticeable even days later).

    Disagree with banning street food, they generally use gas, not charcoal, and their impact must be marginal compared with transportation and crop burning...and people have to eat, a ban would trigger some strong reaction IMHO...
    Last edited by Farang Ky Ay; 27-01-2020 at 01:30 AM.

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •