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  1. #13551
    Thailand Expat misskit's Avatar
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    Elderly COVID patient dies at home as hospital refuses to send ambulance


    An 82-year-old bed-ridden patient has died at home, about a week after she was found to be infected with COVID-19. She did not develop any typical symptoms and a hospital refused to send an ambulance, according to the non-profit Zendai Foundation.


    The foundation said on its Facebook page that the woman did, however, have diabetes, high blood pressure, chronic kidney disease and other illnesses when she contracted asymptomatic COVID-19 on July 10th.


    It also said that the patient’s relatives contacted a hospital and asked for an ambulance to collect the patient, in line with her entitlement. The hospital, however, declined their request, saying that they must take the patient to hospital themselves.


    Suraphan Waiyakorn, chief of the Zendai Centre in Nonthaburi, said that the family does not have a car, so it would have been difficult for a bed-ridden patient to be taken to hospital.


    The family then contacted the Zendai Foundation, which immediately arranged for Molnupiravir medication to be sent to the family. The patient was given the drug, but she died today (Saturday), said Suraphan.


    He went on to say that the foundation has sent medication to about 30 patients who could not get access to the drug through hospitals.


    The foundation claims that, since July 4th, it had received reports of four COVID-related fatalities in home isolation.

    Elderly COVID patient dies at home as hospital refuses to send ambulance | Thai PBS World : The latest Thai news in English, News Headlines, World News and News Broadcasts in both Thai and English. We bring Thailand to the world

  2. #13552
    Thailand Expat misskit's Avatar
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    Online medical service launched for COVID-infected Gold Health Card holders

    Thailand’s National Health Security Office (NHSO) is providing a free online telemedicine service to COVID-infected Gold Health Card holders in Bangkok, Nonthaburi, Nakhon Pathom, Pathum Thani, Samut Prakan and Samut Sakhon.


    Deputy Government Spokesperson Rachada Dhnadirek said the card holders can register either via the “Good Doctor Technology” or the “MorDee” applications and they will get access to online counselling from a doctor, who will assess their symptoms and prescribe medicines, which may include Favipiravir, to be sent to their house free of charge.


    The service is being made possible through the cooperation of two companies, which have been providing digital medical services through their applications, said Rachada.


    As most COVID-19 patients have mild symptoms, such as a low fever, anosmia, a sore throat, runny nose or cough, she said that the Ministry of Public Health has recently issued guidelines to cope with these patients.


    After having tested positive with rapid antigen tests, these patients will be treated as out-patients, but will have access to medication at their medical facilities, in accordance with their entitlements. They should isolate at home for seven days, plus three additional days for observation, said Rachada.


    The NHSO’s service is in addition to the Public Health Ministry’s guidelines for COVID-19 out-patients in home isolation and covers only Gold Health Card holders.


    Thais who are not covered by the social security scheme, or the healthcare schemes provided for government officials and state enterprise workers, are entitled to Gold Card health care.


    Online medical service launched for COVID-infected Gold Health Card holders | Thai PBS World : The latest Thai news in English, News Headlines, World News and News Broadcasts in both Thai and English. We bring Thailand to the world

  3. #13553
    Thailand Expat harrybarracuda's Avatar
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    Poor old froggies, too late to the party again. I expect the midget will be complaining.

    BRUSSELS, July 20 (Reuters) - The European Commission has dropped nearly all of its order of 60 million doses of a new COVID-19 vaccine from French firm Valneva (VLS.PA), the EU executive said on Wednesday, in a move that all but wipes out the shot's value for the company.
    The EU agreed in November last year to buy the vaccine, with the first 27 million doses to be delivered this year, butthe vaccine received approval only last month after protracted delays.

    European countries are now well supplied with other vaccines, and vaccination programmes have slowed.
    Under the revised deal, European countries will now buy just 1.25 million doses from Valneva, to be delivered in August and September, with an option to buy another 1.25 million by the end of this year.
    "The order volume does not reflect the interest we see from European citizens," Valneva CEO Thomas Lingelbach said in a statement.

    Rx Securities analyst Samir Devani - who had once forecast 400 million euros ($407.96 million) in COVID vaccine sales for Valneva largely on the basis of the original EU contract - wrote off the value of the shot when the company revealed last month that the contract was in jeopardy. read more
    On Wednesday, he said Valneva would likely use existing stock for the vaccine - VLA2001 - to fulfil the smaller EU order.

    The company has suspended manufacturing for now, and said it would only further invest in the vaccine and its second-generation COVID-19 vaccine if deals with other customers are secured alongside necessary funding in coming months.
    Britain cancelled its Valneva vaccine contract last year. The company has also secured approvals in Bahrain and the United Arab Emirates.
    It will be very difficult for Valneva to maintain a production line for VLA2001without more orders, added Devani.
    Valneva's vaccine uses technology already employed for decades in shots against polio, influenza and hepatitis. read more
    The company had bet it would entice people who had refused COVID vaccines that used newer technology such as mRNA. But another vaccine from Novavax (NVAX.O), which also uses a traditional technology, has had limited take-up in Europe.
    The continent is now battling a new COVID-19 wave spearheaded by the Omicron offshoot BA.5. Close to 3 million new cases were reported in Europe last week and hospitalisation rates have doubled, Hans Kluge, the WHO Regional Director for Europe, said on Tuesday. read more
    Health officials have said elderly and vulnerable populations should be given second vaccine booster doses.
    Meanwhile, regulators in Europe have begun reviewing variant-specific vaccines that could be ready later this year.

    https://www.reuters.com/business/hea...es-2022-07-20/

  4. #13554
    Thailand Expat harrybarracuda's Avatar
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    The top symptoms of the Omicron COVID-19 variant may differ from symptoms that were common at the start of the pandemic. Omicron may also be less severe than the Delta variant, a study out of the U.K. found.

    People with Omicron often report sore throat and a hoarse voice, which were not as prevalent in Delta cases, a Zoe Health Study found. This is true for vaccinated and unvaccinated patients.

    People who contracted the Omicron variant were less likely to be hospitalized compared to those with the Delta variant, Zoe Health said in a
    press release about the study. Symptoms also lasted for shorter periods – an average of 6.87 days, compared to 8.89 days.

    Earlier COVID-19 variants often caused people to lose their sense of smell. The study found that symptom appeared in less than 20% of cases and often days after the first symptoms began. Other serious symptoms that used to be prevalent – like fever, headaches, brain fog and eye soreness – are less prevalent in Omicron cases. However, they can still occur.

    The Zoe Health Study, which was supported by grants from the U.K. Government Department of Health and Social Care, tested people in the U.K. who were vaccinated. They tested participants between June 1 and November 27, 2021 – when the Delta variant was dominant – and between Dec. 20, 2021 to Jan. 17, 2022 – when the Omicron variant dominated.


    The study collected 62,002 positive tests and looked at those patients' symptoms. In addition to a difference in the length and types of symptoms between the two variants, researchers said Omicron is found far less frequently in the lower respiratory tract. This is where infection can cause more severe symptoms, potentially sending people to the hospital.


    They also found Omicron symptoms do not last as long in vaccinated people.


    Delta is better at infecting lung cells than Omicron, the study found. And while Omicron appears to be much more transmissible than previous variants, this variant affects fewer organs than Delta, other studies have found, according to Zoe Health.


    The Omicron subvariant that was prevalent at the end of 2021 and the start of 2022 was labeled BA.1. There are now Omicron subvariants, labeled BA.4 and BA.5 that appear to be causing a loss of sense of smell or taste again, Dr. Celine Gounder told CBS News.


    A similar study from Imperial College London also found that there was lower reporting of loss of sense of smell and taste for the Omicron variant. However, the study which is yet to be peer-reviewed, found there was higher reporting of cold-like and influenza-like symptoms.


    The study used data from REACT-1, a widespread survey in the U.K. that collected at-home COVID-19 tests from about 1.5 million participants between 2020 to 2022, and analyzed how symptoms differed between variants and subvariants.

    While it is perceived that newer variants like Omicron are milder, Omicron subvariant BA.2 was associated with reporting more symptoms, with greater disruption to daily activities, than the Omicron subvariant BA.1.

    How COVID-19 symptoms are changing: A sore throat and hoarse voice became top symptoms with newer variant - CBS News
    Warning: Be cautious if you are a fragile pink

  5. #13555
    Thailand Expat harrybarracuda's Avatar
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    COVID-19 was full of surprises early on, causing mild problems in the short term for some people and serious complications for others.

    Long term, it may be just as capricious.

    Studies are spotting potential heart and brain problems up to a year after infection with SARS-CoV-2, even in people who had mild COVID-19.


    The possible long-term effects include "a myriad of symptoms affecting different organs," said Dr. Josť Biller, director of the COVID-19 neurology clinic at Loyola Medicine in Maywood, Illinois. "So, it could be the lungs, it could be cardiovascular, it could be the nervous system, it could be mental health or behavioral problems."


    Estimates vary widely on how many people may be affected. Research suggests about 10% to 20% of people experience mid- or long-term issues from COVID-19, according to the
    World Health Organization.


    That may sound small, but COVID has affected hundreds of millions of people, said Dr. Siddharth Singh, director of the post-COVID-19 cardiology clinic at the Smidt Heart Institute at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles. In the U.S. alone, about 80 million people have been infected with the coronavirus since the pandemic started in early 2020.


    There are many more questions than answers, including about who is most at risk for post-COVID problems and how long the effects might last. But experts say people who have had COVID-19 should be aware of these potential risks:

    Heart disease and stroke

    A study published in
    Nature Medicine in February concluded the risk of heart problems one year after COVID-19 infection is "substantial."


    Those heart problems include irregular heartbeats, heart failure (the inability of the heart to pump properly), coronary disease (buildup in arteries that limits blood flow), heart attacks and more.


    The study included 153,760 U.S. veterans, most of them white and male, who tested positive for COVID-19 between March 1, 2020, and Jan. 15, 2021, and survived at least 30 days. They were compared to a control group of more than 5.6 million veterans without COVID-19.


    Researchers adjusted for pre-existing conditions and found that after one year, those who had COVID-19 were 63% more likely to have some kind of cardiovascular issue, resulting in about 45 additional cases per 1,000 people.


    Risks were elevated even among people who did not have severe COVID-19. That matches what Singh has seen in his post-COVID clinic, which began treating patients in December 2020. "A lot of patients that we have seen with long-haul symptoms had minor illness and had been treated at home."


    Singh also treats many people with postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome, or POTS, which can cause dizziness, fainting and heart palpitations. "These palpitations mostly tend to happen when people are standing or sitting upright," he said.


    In rare cases, "smoldering inflammation around the heart or in the heart" can occur, Singh said.


    The Nature Medicine study also found a 52% increased risk of stroke at one year among COVID-19 survivors, or about four extra strokes per 1,000 people.


    Brain problems


    Among the 113 patients in Biller's long COVID clinic, almost 3 in 4 reported so-called brain fog. "They are unable to multitask, and have difficulties in learning new skills," said Biller, who also leads the department of neurology at the Loyola University Chicago Stritch School of Medicine.


    A recent
    Nature study of 785 people ages 51 to 81 found those who had COVID-19 lost more grey matter and had more brain shrinkage than those who had not.


    Mental health


    A study published in February in
    BMJ used the same pool of U.S. veterans as the Nature Medicine study and found a 35% increased risk of anxiety disorders after COVID-19, or 11 additional cases per 1,000 people after one year compared to those without COVID-19. The risk for depression was slightly higher.


    When researchers compared people who'd had COVID-19 versus the flu, the risk of mental health disorders was again significantly higher with COVID-19.


    "Mental health is closely tied to cardiovascular health," Singh said. If somebody is anxious or depressed, "they're not going to exercise that much. They're not going to watch their diet, take control of their hypertension and other risk factors, their sleep is affected which can impact cardiovascular health, and so on."


    He said many COVID-19 survivors also have unresolved pain, grief and post-traumatic stress disorder, which can contribute to a decline in mental health.


    Fatigue


    At Biller's post-COVID clinic, patients often describe experiencing "crushing" fatigue. Fatigue was the most common post-COVID symptom reported in a review of several studies published in August in
    Scientific Reports.


    What you can do


    Even though the long-term risks from having COVID-19 may be real, Singh said, they should not cause most people to be terribly worried. Instead, he said, it's a good time to be proactive:


    – Take care of yourself. "A lot of my family and friends have gotten COVID earlier this year and last year," Singh said. "What I'm telling them is just to be a bit more vigilant when it comes to their cardiovascular health and making sure their cardiovascular risk factors are well-controlled. Obviously, if one is having chest pain, shortness of breath or palpitations, that should not be ignored."


    – Symptoms lingering? See a doctor. "It can take anywhere from two to six weeks to completely bounce back from the infection," Singh said. But if people have persistent physical and mental symptoms beyond four to six weeks, "it's wise to get checked out."


    – Pay attention to sleep. Sleep disorders – which are linked to heart problems – can develop after COVID-19, research shows. "The importance of good sleep cannot be overemphasized," Singh said. If you're having trouble, you might need to see a specialist.


    – Stay informed. As research continues to untangle the mysteries of COVID-19, people will need trustworthy information. The
    Centers for Disease Control and Prevention offers regular updates about the coronavirus, and the National Library of Medicine provides a tutorial for evaluating health information.


    – Get vaccinated. COVID-19 vaccines reduce the risk of infection and severe illness. And while it's not yet clear whether vaccination influences long-term symptoms in people who get breakthrough infections, Biller said, "prevention is the key."

    https://www.heart.org/en/news/2022/0...brain-problems

  6. #13556
    Thailand Expat harrybarracuda's Avatar
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    A lengthy and heavy article about how nasal spray vaccines may be the way forward.

    You'll probably want to grab a coffee.

    Just a moment...

  7. #13557
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  8. #13558
    Thailand Expat harrybarracuda's Avatar
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    Let's hope they don't panic. Mortality rates are still low.

    Bangkok is bracing for a sixth wave of Covid-19, as Covid cases in the capital bounce back to over 10,000 new cases per day, threatening the city's public health system.
    As Thailand gradually recovers from lockdown measures, the spread of the newly emerged BA.5 Omicron subvariant has yet again put Bangkok back on high alert for another Covid-19 outbreak.
    While the Bangkok Metropolitan Administration (BMA) says it is ready to cope with another wave of the Covid-19 epidemic, Bangkok could be faced with tens of thousands Covid patients by the time this outbreak peaks in late August.

    Since the number of new Covid infections has been steadily rising during recent weeks, especially in Bangkok where half the nationwide Covid cases are reported, Dr Yong Poovorawan, head of the Center of Excellence in Clinical Virology at Faculty of Medicine, Chulalongkorn University, said this is the sign of another approaching wave of Covid-19 outbreak.
    Dr Yong said the change of the prevalent Covid strain from the BA.2 Omicron subvariant to the BA.5 subvariant is behind the recent surge.
    "As the BA.5 subvariant has the ability to elude protection from the virus, produced after vaccinations and infections, it is by far the most infectious Covid strain, because it can infect those who are already vaccinated or previously recovered from a Covid infection," he said.
    "Thailand will face a sixth wave of outbreak, in which we will see a higher infection rate than previous waves."
    The BA.5 subvariant was first identified early this January in South Africa. Since then, it has spread quickly and become the main Covid variant in many countries throughout the world and has been noticed in Thailand since April.
    It now makes up about 26.1% of the tested samples, according to the genomic examination of Covid cases in Thailand during the past month by the Center for Medical Genomics of Mahidol University. Most BA.5 subvariant samples were from the Bangkok Metropolitan area.
    As Covid infections continue to rise, Dr Yong estimated tens of thousands of new infections are likely per day by the end of August.
    "Since this round of Covid-19 epidemic has occurred right after the resumption of on-site teaching at public schools nationwide for the first time since the Covid-19 lockdown in 2020, the virus will spread easily among students in schools. It can then further spread to their family members and infect large numbers of people," he said.
    Meanwhile, BMA figures on Covid infections in Bangkok during the past week show there are about 2,000–3,000 new Covid cases via RT-PCR test a day, while around 5,000–6,000 more cases were identified by ATK test.
    Even though the Ministry of Public Health only records around 2,000 cases of new Covid-19 infections per day, because the BA.5 Omicron subvariant generally causes mild sickness among healthy people, a large number of infected people who have few symptoms are not reported.
    "However, this strain can still cause severe symptoms among vulnerable groups, so we need to make sure they receive a booster vaccine and can access medication once infected," he added.
    City faces up to challenge
    In the wake of the BA.5 Omicron subvariant outbreak in the capital, Bangkok governor Chadchart Sittipunt said he had ordered four initial measures to cope with the surge of Covid-19 infections.
    They comprise adding an extra working day for all 69 Public Health Centers under the BMA on Saturdays, opening walk-in vaccination booths at the centres every Friday and Saturday, proactive Covid-19 screening at schools, and a proactive vaccination campaign targeting vulnerable groups.
    "Even though the BMA is focussed on primary care and health promotion, in terms of advanced medical care, the BMA has 11 hospitals under its wing, comprising 11% of overall hospital bed capacity in Bangkok," Mr Chadchart said.
    "BMA is not the sole administrator of Bangkok's public health system. So we have to work closely with other stakeholders such as the Public Health Ministry, medical schools, and military and police, all of whom have hospitals of their own as part of the city's public health system."
    He also urged the people to keep up their guard and strictly follow Covid-19 prevention measures, including wearing facemasks in public areas.
    Dr Wantanee Wattana, deputy city clerk of the BMA, said the BMA is working with the ministry and Government Pharmaceutical Organization to prepare medical stockpiles for Covid patients and provide a support system for the patients with mild symptoms in home isolation.
    Even though Bangkok still has spare hospital beds available for Covid in-patients, the number of new Covid patients requiring hospital treatment in Bangkok has grown to approximately 1,000 a day.
    The BMA has designated the Erawan Emergency Medical Service Center to be a focal point for patient transfers between hospitals and ensure proper hospital bed management.
    Meanwhile, Natjiraporn Dang-iad, vice-president of Sirindhorn Hospital, a hospital under the BMA's administration in Prawet district, said Covid patients seeking medical care have increased, though most have very mild symptoms and only 5% need to be admitted.
    Ms Natjiraporn said the hospital still has the capacity to receive more Covid patients, though many hospital staff are infected with Covid-19 as well, which puts a squeeze on personnel.
    "We had insufficient staff to begin with, so when many of our staff get sick, we don't have enough staff to take of patients. This is why we would like to ask people to take Covid-19 prevention measures seriously to prevent transmission to others," she said.

    City braces for sixth wave with big spike in infections picked

  9. #13559
    Thailand Expat misskit's Avatar
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    Transportation Services and Restaurants Urged to Commit to Health Measures

    BANGKOK (NNT) - Business operators have been urged to step up their compliance with disease control measures, such as by having adequate hand sanitizing stations and ventilation to ensure health safety.


    A recent survey found that the public is observing health precautions less rigorously than before despite the persisting COVID-19 situation. Health authorities are urging people to protect themselves by observing precautions while asking various establishments to be stringent with their measures.


    The Department of Health said the Thai public has been observing health precautions less closely than before, noting that the rate of mask wearing has dropped from 96.1% in May to 94.6% in July. The findings were based on the department’s Anamai Poll survey conducted during May and July of this year.


    Department Director-General Suwannachai Wattanayingcharoenchai said the rate of hand washing dropped from 91.5% to 88.1%, while social distancing declined to 78.6% from 84.6%. Overall, the percentage of individuals observing all three precautions dropped to 74.1% from 82%.


    Members of the public are encouraged to keep wearing a mask in crowded areas or places with poor ventilation, especially if they belong to the ‘608 group’ of persons at risk of developing severe COVID symptoms.


    Transportation Services and Restaurants Urged to Commit to Health Measures

  10. #13560
    Thailand Expat harrybarracuda's Avatar
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    An interesting article about the long term cardiovascular impact of Covid-19 infection.

    Heart disease after COVID: what the data say

  11. #13561
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    Quote Originally Posted by harrybarracuda View Post
    An interesting article about the long term cardiovascular impact of Covid-19 infection.

    Heart disease after COVID: what the data say
    For who?

    Most people might be more concerned about the effects of the vaccines.

    What To Know About Myocarditis, a Rare COVID-19 Vaccine Side Effect in Young People | Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center

  12. #13562
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    Quote Originally Posted by hallelujah View Post
    Most people might be more concerned about the effects of the vaccines.
    Yeah, waay more hazardous than Bangkok ecky.


  13. #13563
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    I'll just leave this here, ladies and gentlemen.

    Children face a one in 500,000 risk of dying from Covid, amid row over if kids should be vaccinated | Daily Mail Online

    Chances of dying from lightning: 1 in 693,878 for ALL people
    Chances of dying from a bee sting: 1 in 46, 562 for ALL people

    Up to you, people, but as I said, facts not fear with me.

  14. #13564
    Thailand Expat harrybarracuda's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by hallelujah View Post
    Here's a fucking idea: Try reading the article. I can help you with the big words.

    Most people might be more concerned about the effects of the vaccines.
    That's because they're morons like you who don't understand science.

    Heart problems much more likely with COVID infection than vaccine


    https://www.cidrap.umn.edu/news-perspective/2022/04/heart-problems-much-more-likely-covid-infection-vaccine


    Higher risk of heart complications from COVID-19 than vaccines -study


    https://www.reuters.com/business/healthcare-pharmaceuticals/heart-condition-risk-higher-after-covid-19-illness-than-vaccines-uk-study-2021-12-14/


    Myocarditis: COVID-19 Is a Much Bigger Risk to the Heart than Vaccination


    https://www.clinicallab.com/myocarditis-covid-19-is-a-much-bigger-risk-to-the-heart-than-vaccination-26198


    Cardiac Complications More Common After COVID-19 Than Vaccination


    https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jama/article-abstract/2792604

  15. #13565
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    Quote Originally Posted by harrybarracuda View Post



    That's because they're morons like you who don't understand science.
    Can you explain "science" to this 36 year old mother who would have likely been unaffected by Covid if she hadn't taken the vaccine?

    'Wonderful' mother-of-two, 36, died from first dose of Covid Pfizer vaccine, inquest told | Daily Mail Online

    You carry on with the abuse, I'll keep on with the facts, harry.

  16. #13566
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    Quote Originally Posted by hallelujah View Post
    I'll just leave this here, ladies and gentlemen.

    Children face a one in 500,000 risk of dying from Covid, amid row over if kids should be vaccinated | Daily Mail Online

    Chances of dying from lightning: 1 in 693,878 for ALL people
    Chances of dying from a bee sting: 1 in 46, 562 for ALL people

    Up to you, people, but as I said, facts not fear with me.
    Any thoughts, harry?

  17. #13567
    Hangin' Around cyrille's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by hallelujah View Post
    I'll just leave this here, ladies and gentlemen.

    Children face a one in 500,000 risk of dying from Covid, amid row over if kids should be vaccinated | Daily Mail Online

    Chances of dying from lightning: 1 in 693,878 for ALL people
    Chances of dying from a bee sting: 1 in 46, 562 for ALL people

    Up to you, people, but as I said, facts not fear with me.

    The Daily Mail?


    Fkin Hell.


    (Further readjusts picture of hal)

  18. #13568
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    Thanks Jeff

    agree 100 %

  19. #13569
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    Quote Originally Posted by harrybarracuda View Post
    Studies are spotting potential heart and brain problems up to a year after infection
    I had covid a few months ago and certainly did not suffer any drain bramage

  20. #13570
    Thailand Expat harrybarracuda's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by hallelujah View Post
    Can you explain "science" to this 36 year old mother who would have likely been unaffected by Covid if she hadn't taken the vaccine?

    'Wonderful' mother-of-two, 36, died from first dose of Covid Pfizer vaccine, inquest told | Daily Mail Online

    You carry on with the abuse, I'll keep on with the facts, harry.
    I already have, but you're too stupid to understand the articles with big words and complicated phrases like "rare complications".




  21. #13571
    Thailand Expat harrybarracuda's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by hallelujah View Post
    Any thoughts, harry?
    I have plenty, unlike you who uses the Daily Mail for his opinions.

  22. #13572
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    Quote Originally Posted by Buckaroo Banzai View Post
    certainly did not suffer any drain bramage
    Not did me neither.

  23. #13573
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    Malaysia is lifting Covid entry restrictions completely starting August 1st. If I read this correctly, downloading the MySejahtera app seems to be optional although some businesses there might still require it to allow entry:

    From 1st August 2022, all travellers are allowed to enter Malaysia regardless of their COVID-19 vaccination status and do not require a pre-departure or on-arrival COVID-19 test. There are no quarantine orders related to COVID-19 enforced by the Malaysian Government upon arrival.

    Travellers can download and activate the MySejahtera application before or after arrival to Malaysia to indicate their COVID-19 risk status while staying in Malaysia. The COVID-19 risk status in MySejahtera may be checked upon entering premises.


    MySafeTravel

  24. #13574
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    Quote Originally Posted by harrybarracuda View Post
    I have plenty, unlike you who uses the Daily Mail for his opinions.
    Oh come on.

    There are plenty of examples of this. Even the manufacturers have admitted to it.

    It's all about risk, isn't it? Do you feel at risk from the current strain and do you feel that the current vaccines will make much difference?

    For most people the answer is clearly no.

  25. #13575
    Thailand Expat harrybarracuda's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by hallelujah View Post
    Oh come on.

    There are plenty of examples of this. Even the manufacturers have admitted to it.

    It's all about risk, isn't it? Do you feel at risk from the current strain and do you feel that the current vaccines will make much difference?

    For most people the answer is clearly no.
    How many examples do I have to post of research showing the risk of myocarditis and other cardiovascular problems is significantly higher in the infected than in the vaccinated?

    Not to mention that once they discovered this RARE side effect, they advised physicians who know how to treat it.

    Risk wise it's a no brainer.

    Sadly you have a semi-functional brain indoctrinated by antivax bullshit.

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