Page 496 of 526 FirstFirst ... 396446486488489490491492493494495496497498499500501502503504506 ... LastLast
Results 12,376 to 12,400 of 13145
  1. #12376
    Thailand Expat harrybarracuda's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Last Online
    @
    Posts
    82,239
    Is he talking about this?

    The COVID-2019 Thread

    Other interesting Delta news is that there is a new, more transmissible variant in the UK that's up to 12% of infections but is, at first look, less symptomatic than other variants.

    I expect the Doc will have a video on that next week.

    New Covid strain that's less likely to cause symptoms spreading through UK - Mirror Online
    Warning: Be cautious if you are a fragile pink

  2. #12377
    Thailand Expat harrybarracuda's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Last Online
    @
    Posts
    82,239
    The good news:

    New Zealand has announced it will reopen its borders to vaccinated visitors in the opening months of 2022, for the first time since prime minister Jacinda Ardern announced their snap closure in the first month of the Covid-19 pandemic. The country’s borders have been closed for more than a year and a half. The border will initially open to New Zealand citizens and visa holders coming from Australia, then from the rest of the world, and finally to all other vaccinated visitors from the end of April.
    The not quite-so-good news.

    They will still have to self-isolate at home for a week, but will no longer have to pass through the country’s expensive and highly-space limited managed isolation facilities.


    New Zealand to reopen borders to vaccinated visitors from new year | New Zealand | The Guardian
    Last edited by harrybarracuda; 24-11-2021 at 12:49 PM.

  3. #12378
    Thailand Expat harrybarracuda's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Last Online
    @
    Posts
    82,239
    Gormless tossers.

    Seven anti-vaccine doctors fell sick after gathering earlier this month for a Florida “summit” at which alternative treatments for Covid-19 were discussed.

    “I have been on ivermectin for 16 months, my wife and I,” Dr Bruce Boros told the audience at the event held at the World Equestrian Center in Ocala, adding: “I have never felt healthier in my life.”

    The 71-year-old cardiologist and staunch anti-vaccine advocate contracted Covid-19 two days later, according to the head event organizer, Dr John Littell.

    Littell, an Ocala family physician, also
    told the Daily Beast six other doctors among 800 to 900 participants at the event also tested positive or developed Covid-19 symptoms “within days of the conference”.

    Littell raised the suggestion the conference was therefore a super-spreader event but rejected it, vehemently saying: “No. I think they had gotten it from New York or Michigan or wherever they were from,” he told the Beast. “It was really the people who flew in from other places.”

    He also said: “Everybody so far has responded to treatment with ivermectin … Bruce is doing well.”


    The Beast said sources close to Boros said he was gravely ill at his Key West home.

    Seven doctors contract Covid after attending Florida anti-vaccine summit | Florida | The Guardian


  4. #12379
    Thailand Expat
    malmomike77's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2021
    Last Online
    @
    Posts
    3,090
    Seems the EU trashing of AZ and its subsequent low uptake may be partly why they are suffering 4th and 5th waves with deadlier consequences - sadly.

    AstraZeneca vaccine may give longer protection that is shielding UK from new Covid wave

    Giving Oxford jab to elderly could be why Britain has so far avoided virus crisis hitting Europe, say experts

    AstraZeneca may offer longer-lasting immunity than other vaccines, scientists have said amid claims that the jab has helped Britain avoid the latest Covid wave in Europe.

    Pascal Soriot, the chief executive of AstraZeneca, said the decision to give the Oxford vaccine to older people in Britain could be one of the reasons the UK was not seeing not "so many hospitalisations relative to Europe" despite a high number of cases.

    The Telegraph understands that the pharmaceutical company is preparing to release data showing that its jab offers long term T-cell immunity for older people even after antibodies wane. Mr Soriot said the immunity provided by T-cells may be "more durable".


    Several countries – including France, Germany, Spain and Belgium – restricted the AstraZeneca vaccine to under-65s in the early stages of their rollouts, claiming there was not enough data to prove it worked for older people.


    In France, daily infections passed 30,000 for the first time since August on Tuesday, with an increase of 63 per cent in a week. Germany confirmed it was planning to make vaccination mandatory for soldiers. The seven-day average of Covid deaths in the country is now twice that in Britain.

    "European leaders had all these unfounded concerns about AstraZeneca and its use in older people," a senior government source said. "If you look at the data, you can see us using it early has been incredibly helpful in terms of protecting older and vulnerable people from this disease for longer."

    British experts said Mr Soriot's claims were "plausible" and may be the reason why hospitalisations and deaths have been relatively low even though cases are high.

    Dr Peter English, a former editor of Vaccines in Practice who previously chaired the BMA public health medicine committee, said: "People whose immune systems have produced a strong T-cell response but a weaker antibody response might be more likely to be infected in the first place but more likely to be able to fight the infection, and they will be much less likely to develop severe disease."

    Commenting on the UK's high infection but low hospitalisation rates, he said: "It is plausible that this generated an excellent T-cell response, which means that while people can still be infected and infectious, they are unlikely to be seriously unwell."

    Prof Matthew Snape, of Oxford University, who was chief investigator on booster jabs trials, said: "The best T-cell responses seem to come if you give a first dose of the AstraZeneca vaccine followed by Pfizer."

    Steve Baker, the deputy chairman of the Covid Recovery Group of lockdown-septic Tory MPs, criticised European politicians for snubbing the jab and called for AstraZeneca's data to be made public.

    "Serious politicians ought not to need reminding that what they say and what they do is often a matter of life and death," Mr Baker told The Telegraph. "Once more, it looks like political condemnation from Europe of AstraZeneca may have cost lives.

    "I hope we will see the data and find the facts. If the Government and AstraZeneca have the data, it would be helpful to get it into the public domain."

    Mr Soriot told BBC Radio 4's Today programme the ability of the AstraZeneca jab to stimulate a long-lasting T-cell response in older people "could be" the reason Britain was faring better than Europe.

    more here

    AstraZeneca vaccine may give longer protection that is shielding UK from new Covid wave

  5. #12380
    Thailand Expat harrybarracuda's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Last Online
    @
    Posts
    82,239
    Or it could just be that the bug did most of its killing in the first three waves, hence the numbers.

  6. #12381
    Thailand Expat
    happynz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Last Online
    Today @ 12:52 AM
    Location
    on the corner of dusty and dustier
    Posts
    10,747
    Quote Originally Posted by harrybarracuda View Post
    They will still have to self-isolate at home for a week, but will no longer have to pass through the country’s expensive and highly-space limited managed isolation facilities.
    Self isolation is going to be nearly impossible to manage. Some people will make an honest effort to keep isolated for the week. Others will have people over. Yet others will ignore it and come and go at will.

  7. #12382
    Hangin' Around cyrille's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Last Online
    @
    Location
    Home
    Posts
    25,981
    Quote Originally Posted by harrybarracuda View Post
    Gormless tossers.
    You missed out the best part:
    “I have been on ivermectin for 16 months, my wife and I,” Dr Bruce Boros told the audience at the event held at the World Equestrian Center in Ocala, adding: “I have never felt healthier in my life.”

    The 71-year-old cardiologist and staunch anti-vaccine advocate contracted Covid-19 two days later, according to the head event organizer, Dr John Littell.

    At the summit in Ocala, Boros criticized his 97-year-old father for getting a Covid vaccine, saying: “He had been brainwashed … He got it. He didn’t tell me. I was very upset. I wanted to give him a spanking. He got both jabs.”
    No offence intended, but...



  8. #12383
    Thailand Expat harrybarracuda's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Last Online
    @
    Posts
    82,239
    Quote Originally Posted by happynz View Post
    Self isolation is going to be nearly impossible to manage. Some people will make an honest effort to keep isolated for the week. Others will have people over. Yet others will ignore it and come and go at will.
    Obviously you don't know how they did it in the UK.

    Phone calls, personal visits and heavy fines.

    Hardly anyone "came and went at will".

  9. #12384
    Thailand Expat panama hat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Last Online
    Today @ 03:14 AM
    Location
    Way, Way South of the border now - thank God!
    Posts
    30,846
    Quote Originally Posted by malmomike77 View Post
    Seems the EU trashing of AZ and its subsequent low uptake may be partly why they are suffering 4th and 5th waves with deadlier consequences - sadly.
    Quote Originally Posted by harrybarracuda View Post
    Or it could just be that the bug did most of its killing in the first three waves, hence the numbers.
    That would take away NPT's EU-bashing.



    Quote Originally Posted by harrybarracuda View Post
    Obviously you don't know how they did it in the UK.

    Phone calls, personal visits and heavy fines.

    Hardly anyone "came and went at will".
    The UK isn't NZ . . . structures here aren't nearly as sophisticated as in the UK.

  10. #12385
    Thailand Expat
    OhOh's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Last Online
    Yesterday @ 11:16 PM
    Location
    Where troubles melt like lemon drops
    Posts
    23,476
    Science.

    Serologic Testing of US Blood Donations to Identify Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2)–Reactive Antibodies: December 2019–January 2020

    Sridhar V Basavaraju, Monica E Patton, Kacie Grimm, Mohammed Ata Ur Rasheed, Sandra Lester, Lisa Mills, Megan Stumpf, Brandi Freeman, Azaibi Tamin, Jennifer Harcourt ... Show more

    Clinical Infectious Diseases, Volume 72, Issue 12, 15 June 2021, Pages e1004–e1009, Serologic Testing of US Blood Donations to Identify Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2)–Reactive Antibodies: December 2019–January 2020 | Clinical Infectious Diseases | Oxford Academic

    Published: 30 November 2020

    "BackgroundSevere acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), the virus that causes coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), was first identified in Wuhan, China, in December 2019, with subsequent worldwide spread. The first US cases were identified in January 2020.

    Methods

    To determine if SARS-CoV-2–reactive antibodies were present in sera prior to the first identified case in the United States on 19 January 2020, residual archived samples from 7389 routine blood donations collected by the American Red Cross from 13 December 2019 to 17 January 2020 from donors resident in 9 states (California, Connecticut, Iowa, Massachusetts, Michigan, Oregon, Rhode Island, Washington, and Wisconsin) were tested at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention for anti–SARS-CoV-2 antibodies. Specimens reactive by pan-immunoglobulin (pan-Ig) enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) against the full spike protein were tested by IgG and IgM ELISAs, microneutralization test, Ortho total Ig S1 ELISA, and receptor-binding domain/ACE2 blocking activity assay.

    Results

    Of the 7389 samples, 106 were reactive by pan-Ig. Of these 106 specimens, 90 were available for further testing. Eighty-four of 90 had neutralizing activity, 1 had S1 binding activity, and 1 had receptor-binding domain/ACE2 blocking activity >50%, suggesting the presence of anti–SARS-CoV-2–reactive antibodies. Donations with reactivity occurred in all 9 states.

    Conclusions

    These findings suggest that SARS-CoV-2 may have been introduced into the United States prior to 19 January 2020."

    Serologic Testing of US Blood Donations to Identify Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2)–Reactive Antibodies: December 2019–January 2020 | Clinical Infectious Diseases | Oxford Academic
    A tray full of GOLD is not worth a moment in time.

  11. #12386
    Thailand Expat harrybarracuda's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Last Online
    @
    Posts
    82,239
    Quote Originally Posted by panama hat View Post
    The UK isn't NZ . . . structures here aren't nearly as sophisticated as in the UK.
    Yes, printing forms, making phone calls and knocking on doors are the sort of sophisticated measures only the UK would understand.


  12. #12387
    Thailand Expat harrybarracuda's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Last Online
    @
    Posts
    82,239
    Quote Originally Posted by OhOh View Post
    These findings suggest that SARS-CoV-2 may have been introduced into the United States prior to 19 January 2020."
    Why would that surprise you hoohoo?

    Aaaaaaaaaaaah you're trying to pin the Wuhan virus on the US again, aren't you?



    A 55-year-old individual from Hubei province in China may have been the first person to have contracted COVID-19, the disease caused by the new coronavirus spreading across the globe. That case dates back to Nov. 17, 2019, according to the South China Morning Post.
    That's more than a month earlier than doctors noted cases in Wuhan, China, which is in Hubei province, at the end of December 2019.
    1st known case of coronavirus traced back to November in China | Live Science

  13. #12388
    Thailand Expat
    OhOh's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Last Online
    Yesterday @ 11:16 PM
    Location
    Where troubles melt like lemon drops
    Posts
    23,476
    ^
    Scientific investigation reported.

    "Science based" not acceptable now?

  14. #12389
    Thailand Expat harrybarracuda's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Last Online
    @
    Posts
    82,239
    Quote Originally Posted by OhOh View Post
    ^
    Scientific investigation reported.

    "Science based" not acceptable now?
    Which bit of "Wuhan virus started in Wuhan" are you struggling with Hoohoo?

  15. #12390
    Thailand Expat harrybarracuda's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Last Online
    @
    Posts
    82,239
    Cunty fucking pissflaps.

    South Africa will be placed under England’s red list travel restrictions after scientists raised the alarm over what is thought to be the worst Covid-19 variant ever identified.
    Hundreds of people who have recently returned from South Africa, where the B.1.1.529 variant was detected, are expected to be tracked down and offered tests in an effort to avoid the introduction of the new strain, which it is feared to be more transmissible and has the potential to evade immunity.
    Whitehall sources said the variant posed “a potentially significant threat to the vaccine programme which we have to protect at all costs”.
    The variant, which was identified on Tuesday, initially sparked concern because it carries an “extremely high number” of mutations meaning that the spike protein now looks dramatically different from the version that vaccines were designed to target. The latest data, presented by South African scientists on Thursday, revealed that the variant also appears to be more transmissible and is already present in provinces throughout the country.
    As well as placing South Africa on the travel red list and banning flights from Friday, officials are reviewing a number of travel measures including whether there should be a limited reintroduction of the use of PCR tests for arrivals. Travellers who test positive will be strongly encouraged to take a PCR so that their results can be sequenced to test for variants.
    Currently, no cases of the new variant have been detected in the UK.
    Ewan Birney, the deputy director general of the European Molecular Biology Laboratory and a member of Spi-M, which advises the UK government, called for urgent “code red” – or “red list-type” – travel restrictions to be placed on southern Africa while the new variant’s transmissibility is investigated, saying it posed a risk of the pandemic regaining momentum.
    He urged countries not to repeat the mistake of failing to act quickly. “What we’ve learnt from the other situations like this – some have turned out OK and some haven’t – is that whilst we’re [investigating] you have to be reasonably paranoid,” he said.
    The new strain, B.1.1.529, was identified after a surge of cases in Gauteng, an urban area containing Pretoria and Johannesburg. Initially the cluster of cases, centred on a university, was assumed to be due to an increase in socialising.
    However, this week the variant was identified as a potential, more ominous, cause of the increase. The first detected cases of the variant were collected in Botswana on 11 November and a case has also been found in Hong Kong – a 36-year-old man who tested positive while in quarantine after a trip to South Africa.
    In the past 48 hours, South African scientists reviewed PCR test data from the Gauteng region and discovered the new variant appeared to be behind the increase in cases, having risen to account for around 90% of cases in a matter of weeks.
    At a national level, South Africa’s daily number of infections hit 1,200 on Wednesday, up from 106 earlier in the month.
    Speaking at a hastily called news conference on Thursday, virologist Tulio de Oliveira, said: “We can see very early signs that this lineage has rapidly increased in prevalence in Gauteng and may already be present in most provinces.”
    Prof Anne von Gottberg, clinical microbiologist and head of respiratory diseases at the National Institute of Communicable Diseases in South Africa, said there were now around 100 cases confirmed through full sequencing of samples, up from just 10 reported yesterday, and signs of community transmission.
    “[The distribution] was a bit narrower two weeks ago, it was mostly in the area related to the outbreak, and now the cases and the percentage case positivity is moving into other districts and subdistricts,” she said. “It might have been localised to start off with but it’s definitely spreading to other districts.”
    Prof Richard Lessells, an infectious diseases specialist at the University of KwaZulu-Natal in Durban, said the coming days and weeks will be key to determine the severity of the variant. “At the beginning of a resurgence we sometimes get fooled into thinking everything is milder disease, and that can be because it’s initially spreading in younger age groups, so we have to see as the spread becomes more generalised whether we are seeing cases of more severe disease,” he said.
    “What gives us some concerns [is] that this variant might not just have enhanced transmissibility, so spreads more efficiently, but might also be able to get around parts of the immune system and the protection we have in our immune system,” he added.

    South Africa to be put on England’s travel red list over new Covid variant | Coronavirus | The Guardian

  16. #12391
    Thailand Expat panama hat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Last Online
    Today @ 03:14 AM
    Location
    Way, Way South of the border now - thank God!
    Posts
    30,846
    Quote Originally Posted by harrybarracuda View Post
    Which bit of "Wuhan virus started in Wuhan" are you struggling with Hoohoo?
    The 'Wuhan' part.

  17. #12392
    Thailand Expat
    OhOh's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Last Online
    Yesterday @ 11:16 PM
    Location
    Where troubles melt like lemon drops
    Posts
    23,476
    Quote Originally Posted by harrybarracuda View Post
    Hundreds of people who have recently returned from South Africa, where the B.1.1.529 variant was detected, are expected to be tracked down and offered tests in an effort to avoid the introduction of the new strain, which it is feared to be more transmissible and has the potential to evade immunity.
    I'm sure they were all double vaccinated and tested prior to arriving, so no problems expected.



    Unless, of course, some were super carriers, able to infect others upon arrival in xxx.

  18. #12393
    Thailand Expat harrybarracuda's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Last Online
    @
    Posts
    82,239
    Quote Originally Posted by OhOh View Post
    I'm sure they were all double vaccinated and tested prior to arriving, so no problems expected.



    Unless, of course, some were super carriers, able to infect others upon arrival in xxx.
    Why do all these chinky sycophants read just the first few lines of a post before spouting bollocks?

    The variant, which was identified on Tuesday, initially sparked concern because it carries an “extremely high number” of mutations meaning that the spike protein now looks dramatically different from the version that vaccines were designed to target.
    Is that a bit too complicated for you Hoohoo? I could try and find an explanation a ten year old might understand.

  19. #12394
    Thailand Expat
    malmomike77's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2021
    Last Online
    @
    Posts
    3,090
    B.1.1.529 - some suggestions that vaccine driven immunity could be as low as 40% against this strain. Its another indication that we are going to be battling COVID for a long time yet.

    What do we know about the new ‘worst ever’ Covid variant?

    UK places South Africa on red travel list over B.1.1.529 variant picked up by scientists in country

    What is the new variant and why is it a concern?

    Scientists have detected a new Covid-19 variant called B.1.1.529 and are working to understand its potential implications. About 50 confirmed cases have been identified in South Africa, Hong Kong and Botswana.

    B.1.1.529 has a very unusual constellation of mutations, which are worrying because they could help it evade the body’s immune response and make it more transmissible, scientists have said. Any new variant that is able to evade vaccines or spread faster than the now-dominant Delta variant might pose a significant threat as the world emerges from the pandemic.


    Where exactly has it been found?

    Early signs from diagnostic laboratories suggest the variant has rapidly increased in the South African province of Gauteng and may already be present in the country’s other eight provinces.

    In a regular daily update on confirmed cases nationally, the National Institute for Communicable Diseases (NICD) reported 2,465 new Covid-19 infections, slightly less than double the previous day’s infections. The NICD did not attribute the latest resurgence to the new variant, although some leading local scientists suspect it is the cause.

    South Africa has confirmed about 100 specimens as B.1.1.529 but the variant has also been found in Botswana and Hong Kong, with the Hong Kong case a traveller from South Africa. As many as 90% of new cases in Gauteng could be B.1.1.529, scientists believe.


    How does it compare to other variants?

    Senior scientists on Thursday evening described B.1.1.529 as the worst variant they had seen since the start of the pandemic. It has 32 mutations in the spike protein, the part of the virus that most vaccines use to prime the immune system against Covid. That is about double the number associated with the Delta variant. Mutations in the spike protein can affect the virus’s ability to infect cells and spread, but also make it harder for immune cells to attack the pathogen.

    more

    https://www.theguardian.com/world/2021/nov/25/what-do-we-know-about-the-new-worst-ever-covid-variant

  20. #12395
    Thailand Expat
    katie23's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Last Online
    @
    Location
    PI
    Posts
    5,197
    ^according to a BBC report, that new South African variant may be named "Nu".

    Seems like Asian markets have reacted (in fear) of the new variant.

    Fears over new COVID-19 variant hit Asian markets, oil prices | Inquirer Business

    In other news, the Philippines has decided to have a "soft opening" for foreign tourists, starting 1 Dec. Travellers must be fully vaccinated, have RT-PCR test before arrival, must come from the list of visa-free countries AND must come from PH's Green List. (USA, UK, Oz, TH & most EU countries are in the yellow list)


    Philippines loosens borders as coronavirus cases continue to drop | Philstar.com

  21. #12396
    Thailand Expat misskit's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Last Online
    @
    Location
    Chiang Mai
    Posts
    39,247
    Will it EVER end?

    New Covid-19 Variant Sets Off Fears of Restrictions, Arrives in Europe

    JOHANNESBURG—Dozens of countries restricted travel to and from South Africa and neighboring nations, hoping to contain a fast-spreading new variant of the coronavirus that scientists say may be more contagious and could render the current crop of Covid-19 vaccines less effective.


    Belgian authorities said Friday that one case of the new variant had been recorded in the country. The person had traveled from abroad, was unvaccinated and hadn’t been infected with Covid-19 previously, Health Minister Frank Vandenbroucke said.


    Experts from the World Health Organization were due to meet later in the day to decide whether to declare the new strain—currently known as B.1.1.529—a “variant of concern.” The WHO uses this label for virus strains that have been proven to be more contagious, lead to more serious illness or decrease the effectiveness of public-health measures, tests, treatments or vaccines.

    MORE New Covid-19 Variant Sets Off Fears of Restrictions, Arrives in Europe - WSJ

  22. #12397
    Thailand Expat harrybarracuda's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Last Online
    @
    Posts
    82,239
    Quote Originally Posted by misskit View Post
    Will it EVER end?

    New Covid-19 Variant Sets Off Fears of Restrictions, Arrives in Europe

    JOHANNESBURG—Dozens of countries restricted travel to and from South Africa and neighboring nations, hoping to contain a fast-spreading new variant of the coronavirus that scientists say may be more contagious and could render the current crop of Covid-19 vaccines less effective.


    Belgian authorities said Friday that one case of the new variant had been recorded in the country. The person had traveled from abroad, was unvaccinated and hadn’t been infected with Covid-19 previously, Health Minister Frank Vandenbroucke said.


    Experts from the World Health Organization were due to meet later in the day to decide whether to declare the new strain—currently known as B.1.1.529—a “variant of concern.” The WHO uses this label for virus strains that have been proven to be more contagious, lead to more serious illness or decrease the effectiveness of public-health measures, tests, treatments or vaccines.

    MORE New Covid-19 Variant Sets Off Fears of Restrictions, Arrives in Europe - WSJ
    The Germans actually got it right when they said something along the lines of "You'll either be vaccinated, cured or dead".

  23. #12398
    Thailand Expat taxexile's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Last Online
    @
    Posts
    17,319
    The Germans actually got it right when they said something along the lines of "You'll either be vaccinated, cured or dead".
    indeed, although snowflakes, anti vaxxers, the easily triggered and those whose feelings are easily hurt gave him a very hard time for speaking such "brutal" truths.

  24. #12399
    Thailand Expat
    katie23's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Last Online
    @
    Location
    PI
    Posts
    5,197
    ^Yup. The 1918 epidemic lasted for ~3 years. We're just entering year 2. (Well, it started around Oct - Nov 2019 in China, then most Western countries went on lockdown or placed restrictions in March 2020).

    We have more data now (and more scientific breakthroughs) but this virus will continue to evolve & mutate.

    *****

    On the local front, the Philippines has placed a travel ban on South Africa & Botswana, effective immediately. Then ban on 5 more African countries, effective Nov. 28. I think that's good (the travel ban) because we've just started to reopen (fewer cases) & don't want to close again due to this new variant named Omicron.

    Link:
    New variant prompts PH to bar some flights | Global News

  25. #12400
    Thailand Expat
    Buckaroo Banzai's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Last Online
    Today @ 04:25 AM
    Location
    My couch
    Posts
    3,437
    Quote Originally Posted by katie23 View Post
    ^Yup. The 1918 epidemic lasted for ~3 years. We're just entering year 2. (Well, it started around Oct - Nov 2019 in China, then most Western countries went on lockdown or placed restrictions in March 2020).

    We have more data now (and more scientific breakthroughs) but this virus will continue to evolve & mutate.

    *****

    On the local front, the Philippines has placed a travel ban on South Africa & Botswana, effective immediately. Then ban on 5 more African countries, effective Nov. 28. I think that's good (the travel ban) because we've just started to reopen (fewer cases) & don't want to close again due to this new variant named Omicron.

    Link:
    New variant prompts PH to bar some flights | Global News
    The big difference is that this is a Pandemic rather than a epidemic. Populations are much more mobile now . This being a Pandemic (all around the world) needs a coordinated world wide response. Unfortunately this does not seem to be the case . I think this and other viruses will be bouncing around the world mutating until we get our act together, or ....
    I stopped at the "Or" because I honestly don't know.
    Last edited by Buckaroo Banzai; 27-11-2021 at 07:55 AM.
    The sooner you fall behind, the more time you have to catch up.

Page 496 of 526 FirstFirst ... 396446486488489490491492493494495496497498499500501502503504506 ... LastLast

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 11 users browsing this thread. (1 members and 10 guests)

  1. Switch

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •