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  1. #12051
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  2. #12052
    Thailand Expat harrybarracuda's Avatar
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    BRUSSELS – A global scheme designed to ensure fair access to COVID-19 vaccines will this month for the first time distribute shots only to countries with the lowest levels of coverage, the World Health Organization said.
    Co-led by the WHO, COVAX has since January largely allocated doses proportionally among its 140-plus beneficiary states according to population size.
    This made some richer nations that had already secured vaccines through separate deals with pharmaceutical firms eligible for COVAX doses alongside countries with no supplies at all.
    With some nations administering booster shots while others are still giving first jabs to the most vulnerable, the WHO has now tweaked the rules.
    “For the October supply we designed a different methodology, only covering participants with low sources of supply,” Mariangela Simao, WHO Assistant Director General for Access to Vaccines, said in a recording of a conference presentation last week posted on the WHO‘s website.

    In a first, COVAX to send COVID shots only to least covered nations | Euronews

  3. #12053
    Thailand Expat harrybarracuda's Avatar
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    Newer variants of the coronavirus like Alpha and Delta are highly contagious, infecting far more people than the original virus. Two new studies offer a possible explanation: The virus is evolving to spread more efficiently through air.
    The realization that the coronavirus is airborne indoors transformed efforts to contain the pandemic last year, igniting fiery debates about masks, social distancing and ventilation in public spaces.
    Most researchers now agree that the coronavirus is mostly transmitted through large droplets that quickly sink to the floor and through much smaller ones, called aerosols, that can float over longer distances indoors and settle directly into the lungs, where the virus is most harmful.
    The new studies don’t fundamentally change that view. But the findings signal the need for better masks in some situations, and indicate that the virus is changing in ways that make it more formidable.
    “This is not an Armageddon scenario,” said Vincent Munster, a virologist at the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, who led one of the new studies. “It is like a modification of the virus to more efficient transmission, which is something I think we all kind of expected, and we now see it happening in real time.”

    Two studies suggest that newer variants of the coronavirus are better at traveling through the air. - The New York Times

  4. #12054
    Thailand Expat misskit's Avatar
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    New Zealand announces ‘no jab, no fly’ policy


    Over 1,300 people infected with Delta variant

    New Zealand announced Sunday tighter border restrictions, as new cases of Covid-19 emerged in areas previously free of the coronavirus.


    “We are introducing the requirement for air travellers aged 17 and over, who are not New Zealand citizens, to be fully vaccinated to enter New Zealand,” Covid-19 response minister Christ Hipkins said.

    The national flag carrier Air New Zealand also announced it was introducing a “no jab, no fly” policy for passengers on all international flights from February 1.


    The country has been hugely successful at containing the virus — reporting just 27 deaths in a population of five million — thanks to tight border controls and lockdowns, allowing pre-pandemic life to mostly resume.


    But the upped border restrictions come as Hamilton city and neighbouring Raglan town was put into a five-day lockdown, with only essential movement permitted, after two people tested positive.


    The cases are not believed to be connected to the latest outbreak in Auckland, 160 kilometers away.


    The city of two million has been in lockdown for nearly seven weeks as officials grapple with an outbreak of the highly transmissible Delta variant that has so far infected 1,320 people.


    About 2,000 people attended an anti-lockdown rally in Auckland over the weekend, with Jacinda Ardern describing the demonstration as “a complete slap in the face” for people who had been abiding by the strict rules banning public gatherings.


    “It was illegal and also it was morally wrong,” the prime minister said.


    New Zealand is pursuing a “Covid zero” elimination strategy.


    It had been free of community transmission for six months before the latest Auckland outbreak.

    Covid: New Zealand announces ‘no jab, no fly’ policy - SAMAA

  5. #12055
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  6. #12056
    Thailand Expat harrybarracuda's Avatar
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    TOKYO -- Mitsubishi Tanabe Pharma has decided to launch the world's first plant-based vaccine in Japan, Nikkei has learned, potentially paving the way to stable COVID-19 vaccine supplies for a country that so far has approved only overseas-made doses.

    The drugmaker plans to begin clinical trials in Japan in October and submit an application to the government as early as March 2022. The company says the vaccine is easy and inexpensive to mass-produce, and that it can cope with new variants.

    Medicago, a Canada-based subsidiary, is developing a technology to make vaccines from a relative of the fast-growing tobacco plant. Viral genes are incorporated into the plants and vaccine components are extracted from the grown leaves.


    The human vaccine that comes from this process is thought to be the first made from plants.

    To date, Mitsubishi Tanabe, which is in the final stage of clinical trials in Canada, Britain and the U.S., has detected no serious side effects.


    A company representative said that trial participants show more than 10 times as many antibodies than COVID-19 patients who have recovered from the disease. "The safety and effectiveness of the vaccine remain comparable to other vaccines," the representative added.


    The representative also said the company is certain that clinical trials in Japan will confirm the findings of the ongoing trials.


    CEO Hiroaki Ueno said he expects Mitsubishi Tanabe's vaccine to cost less than those being made by Pfizer and Moderna. As the process takes advantage of a relative of the fast-growing tobacco plant, the vaccine can be produced in five to eight weeks, the company said. Pfizer requires at least six weeks to make a vaccine that can handle new COVID-19 variants.


    Existing vaccines like Pfizer's require cryopreservation, but Mitsubishi Tanabe's vaccine can be stored at temperatures of 2 C to 8 C. This should make it easier to establish a supply chain and for small clinics to be able to handle supplies, even in emerging countries with weak logistics.


    With a plant in the U.S. and another being built in Canada, Medicago expects to have an annual capacity of 1 billion doses by 2024.


    The company has signed a contract with the Canadian government to supply up to 76 million doses, and aims to commercialize the technology in the country by the end of this year. The company will also consider production in Japan after assessing local demand.


    In 2013, Mitsubishi Tanabe acquired Medicago, whose largest shareholder was a Philip Morris International-backed company. It had been developing an influenza vaccine, but after the COVID-19 outbreak, the Japanese parent sent its president and other executives to Medicago to help with a shift to a coronavirus vaccine.


    Other Japanese drugmakers are rushing to develop coronavirus vaccines. Shionogi plans to begin the final phase of clinical trials by the end of this year. It is aiming for practical application by the end of March. Daiichi Sankyo and Meiji Holdings-backed KM Biologics are also developing COVID-19 vaccines.


    Mitsubishi Tanabe to bring plant-derived COVID vaccine to Japan -
    Nikkei Asia

  7. #12057
    Isle of discombobulation Joe 90's Avatar
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    The European Medical Agency says Thai SBS vaccine is not approved because it has never been asked to inspect the SBS plant. Also AFAIK no clinical trials were run on locally-made AZ vaccine. So, harder for it to be accepted overseas.

  8. #12058
    Thailand Expat harrybarracuda's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Joe 90 View Post
    The European Medical Agency says Thai SBS vaccine is not approved because it has never been asked to inspect the SBS plant. Also AFAIK no clinical trials were run on locally-made AZ vaccine. So, harder for it to be accepted overseas.
    Harder to be accepted in Europe maybe, but that's not who Thailand is selling it to.

  9. #12059
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    Intranasal COVID-19 Vaccine Reduces Disease Severity and Blocks Transmission

    Lancaster University Scientists have developed a COVID-19 vaccine that can be delivered via a nasal spray. In a preclinical trial, the vaccine was found to decrease both disease severity and transmission of the virus. The study results are published in the journal iScience.


    Nipping SARS-CoV-2 "in the bud"

    There are several vaccines authorized for human use against SARS-CoV-2, all of which are administered via intramuscular injection. These vaccines have proven highly effective in reducing the risk of severe COVID-19 disease and death, saving many lives across the globe. While a sore arm is a small price to pay for immunization against an infectious disease, the COVID-19 vaccine research landscape continues to evolve, and novel vaccine formats are being developed to improve our response against the virus further.

    Intranasal vaccines are an example of an alternative approach for vaccination. Researchers at the University of Lancaster have been working in collaboration with scientists at the Texas Biomedical Research Institute to develop an intranasal vaccine against SARS-Cov-2.

    Intranasal vaccines offer several advantages over the currently authorized vaccines, including the potential to block viral transmission. The next generation of COVID-19 vaccines must be able to stop transmission of the virus in individuals that have already been vaccinated, Dr. Muhammad Munir, virologist at the University of Lancaster, told Technology Networks.

    How can an intranasal vaccine achieve this? Let's take a step back and look at how SARS-CoV-2 infects the body. The virus initiates its infection in the cells that line our respiratory system, where it produces millions of progeny and triggers a cascade of replication. This process takes place in a very short time frame, and once the infection spreads, it's hard to get under control. "If we can train the cells that line our respiratory system against the virus, they will be better equipped to tackle the virus before it starts its infection," Munir explained. The intranasal vaccine essentially "nips SARS-CoV-2 in the bud": the virus is cleared before infection is established, therefore reducing transmission of the virus to others.

    Intranasal vaccine effective in preclinical testing

    The intranasal vaccine developed by Munir and colleagues is based on a bird virus known as Newcastle disease virus (NDV), which is harmless to humans. Munir, who is the leader of the research team, explained how the vaccine is created: "We took a SARS-CoV-2 antigen and incorporated it into a NDV such that it acts as a surrogate and presents the antigen to our immune cells. Since the NDV is harmless to us, it provides a mirror image of SARS-CoV-2 and trains our immune system to fight the virus if an individual gets exposed to SARS-CoV-2."

    In a pre-clinical study, the vaccine was tested in both mice and hamster models. High levels of neutralizing IgA and IgG2a antibodies were detected, alongside T cell-mediated immunity when two doses were administered. In hamsters, the same dosage was found to reduce SARS-CoV-2 shedding significantly in nasal turbinate and the lungs, demonstrating its ability to halt the infection at the site of inoculation. This should offer both protection against clinical disease and transmission of the virus between individuals.

    "Vaccine administration up in the nose usually elicits a local immune response that is sufficient to curtail the virus at the site it starts its journey. We noticed a marked reduction of SARS-COV-2 replication in our pre-clinical studies even with one dose. However, better protection was noticed with two doses. Therefore, we aim to test single and double doses in human trials to understand the best vaccination scenario," Munir explained.

    Variants of the virus continue to emerge across the globe and are cause for concern when it comes to vaccine efficacy. How might this intranasal vaccine perform against variants? "The intranasal vaccine in pre-clinical studies produced antibodies that can neutralize several important variants in laboratory experimentation. Given the nature of the vaccine and technology involved, we expect the induction of immunity against current or future variants," Munir said.

    A mission to scale-up and fight vaccine inequality

    The COVID-19 pandemic has emphasized the inequalities that exist across different parts of the world when it comes to accessing healthcare and preventatives such as vaccines. The team note that a unique feature of the intranasal vaccine is its economical and sufficient production in chicken eggs, adopting the same infrastructure that is used to produce influenza vaccines. "There are over 50 centers globally, including many in low- and middle-income countries, that are producing influenza vaccines and are used for only a few months in a year," Munir said. "We aim to exploit these production centers to scale-up this vaccine during the time these facilities are not producing influenza vaccine, which will significantly reduce the cost, and can enable the production of millions of doses without additional resources, manpower and training."

    NDV is also stable at room temperature for weeks, and administration of a nasal vaccine requires little expert training, further reducing associated costs. The team emphasize that this makes the vaccine economical, scalable and deployable.

    In terms of the next steps, the vaccine is heading for human clinical trials. However, this process is not without its challenges and financial burdens. "While immediate emphases on reducing hospitalization and death using COVID-19 vaccines remained evident, funding bodies (public and private) need to support technologies that can block transmission so that a realistic tool can be put in place to end the pandemic," said Munir.

    "The vaccine offers hopes to people with medical conditions, who are needle phobic and people in deprived communities. We are preparing the clinical material and demonstrating its safety and stability to be used in clinical trials which we aim to start in the coming months," he concluded.

    https://www.technologynetworks.com/b...t40Sw5TyTq-ly0

  10. #12060
    Thailand Expat harrybarracuda's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Latindancer View Post
    funding bodies (public and private) need to support technologies that can block transmission so that a realistic tool can be put in place to end the pandemic
    Well given the fact the chinkies got us into this mess and since they're flush with cash.....

    I'm sure they could be persuaded to donate in return for the world skipping from the Nu variant straight to Omicron.


  11. #12061
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  12. #12062
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    Quote Originally Posted by harrybarracuda View Post
    who Thailand is selling it to.
    Whose buying it?

  13. #12063
    Thailand Expat harrybarracuda's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by OhOh View Post
    Whose buying it?
    *Who's

    Google is your friend.

  14. #12064
    Thailand Expat misskit's Avatar
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    Government in talks for COVID pill



    BANGKOK: The government is in talks with US drugmaker Merck & Co to purchase 200,000 courses of the company’s experimental COVID-19 pill, an official said yesterday (Oct 4).

    Many Asian countries are scrambling to lock in supplies of molnupiravir, the name of the oral anti-viral drug, after lagging behind Western nations during initial rollouts of vaccines, reports the Bangkok Post.


    South Korea, Taiwan and Malaysia have said they are already in preliminary purchase discussions with Merck, while the Philippines, which is running a trial on the pill, said it hopes that its domestic study will help it secure favourable procurement terms with the company.

    Government in talks for COVID pill

  15. #12065
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  16. #12066

  17. #12067
    Isle of discombobulation Joe 90's Avatar
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    This page tells you what you must do before you travel to England and after you arrive, if you have been in a red list country or territory in the 10 days before you arrive.
    If you have been in or travelled through a country or territory on the red list in the 10 days before you arrive in England, you will only be allowed to enter the UK if you either:

    • are a British or Irish National
    • have residence rights in the UK

    If you live in England, you should not travel to countries or territories on the red list.
    There are different rules for entering England if you have not been in a red list country or territory.
    Before you travel to England

    Before you travel to England from a red list country you must:


    You must do this even if you are fully vaccinated.
    Read more about taking a COVID-19 test before you travel to England.
    When you arrive in England - red list rules

    When you arrive in England you must quarantine in a managed hotel, and take 2 COVID-19 tests.
    You must do this even if you are fully vaccinated.
    Travelling with children - red list rules

    Children aged 11 to 17 must take a COVID-19 test in the 3 days before travel to England.
    On arrival in England children aged 5 to 17 must quarantine in a managed hotel for 10 full days and take 2 COVID-19 tests.
    Children aged 4 or under do not have to take any travel tests but must enter managed quarantine.
    Red list of countries and territories

    • Afghanistan
    • Angola
    • Argentina
    • Bolivia
    • Botswana
    • Brazil
    • Burundi
    • Cape Verde
    • Chile
    • Colombia
    • Congo (Democratic Republic)
    • Costa Rica
    • Cuba
    • Dominican Republic
    • Ecuador
    • Eritrea
    • Eswatini
    • Ethiopia
    • French Guiana
    • Georgia
    • Guyana
    • Haiti
    • Indonesia
    • Lesotho
    • Malawi
    • Mayotte
    • Mexico
    • Mongolia
    • Montenegro
    • Mozambique
    • Myanmar
    • Namibia
    • Nepal
    • Panama
    • Paraguay
    • Peru
    • Philippines
    • Réunion
    • Rwanda
    • Seychelles
    • Sierra Leone
    • Somalia
    • South Africa
    • Sudan
    • Suriname
    • Tanzania
    • Thailand
    • Trinidad and Tobago
    • Tunisia
    • Uganda
    • Uruguay
    • Venezuela
    • Zambia
    • Zimbabwe

    Transiting through a red list country on your way to England

    If you make a transit stop in a red list country on your way to England you may need to follow the red list rules when you arrive.
    A transit stop is a stop where passengers can get on or off the transport in which you are travelling. It can apply to ships, trains or aeroplanes. Your ticket should show if a stop is a transit stop.
    Making a transit stop would not affect what you have to do on arrival in England if, during the stop:

    • no new passengers board your aircraft, vessel or train carriage
    • passengers get off but do not get back on
    • you are kept separate from passengers who did not arrive on the same aircraft, vessel or train carriage as you

    Private vehicles or coaches travelling through red list countries or territories

    If you are travelling to England in a private vehicle, the rules of the countries and territories you drive through apply. If you drive through a red list country, then you must follow the red list rules when you arrive in England.
    This applies whether you stop in the country or territory or not. You need to record the countries and territories you drive through on your passenger locator form.
    Medical, compassionate and work-related exemptions

    Some people are exempt from red list restrictions for medical or compassionate reasons, or because of the job they do.
    Read about:


    Stay up to date

    The risk posed by individual countries and territories is monitored continuously and the red list is reviewed every 3 weeks. Countries and territories can be added to the list or taken off it more frequently if conditions change.
    Shalom

  18. #12068
    Thailand Expat harrybarracuda's Avatar
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    You gormless fucking twat, it hasn't been updated yet.



    Published 4 October 2021

  19. #12069
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    Quote Originally Posted by harrybarracuda View Post
    You gormless fucking twat, it hasn't been updated yet.

    I believe that red list revisions should be announced by UK today? The list and regulations, above was updated by gov.uk on 4 October.

    Until the list is cut down, it still costs in excess of GBP 2000 just to meet those rules, without travel costs included!

    Even though I have a certificate and a digital app, with vaccine proof for 2 x doses of Astra Zeneca, neither of them meet the stringent UK regulations. They are not in English, Spanish or French!

    Good on the UK for trying to protect the home based population, but hopefully my anomaly can be overcome, as travel is re-opened later this year?

  20. #12070
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    Quote Originally Posted by Switch View Post
    I believe that red list revisions should be announced by UK today? The list and regulations, above was updated by gov.uk on 4 October.

    Until the list is cut down, it still costs in excess of GBP 2000 just to meet those rules, without travel costs included!

    Even though I have a certificate and a digital app, with vaccine proof for 2 x doses of Astra Zeneca, neither of them meet the stringent UK regulations. They are not in English, Spanish or French!

    Good on the UK for trying to protect the home based population, but hopefully my anomaly can be overcome, as travel is re-opened later this year?
    I might be wrong , but I am afraid that the revisions were announced and if I understand correctly Thailand is still in the red list
    As reported By Reuters Oct. 6, 2021,

    " UK Drops Advice Against Non-Urgent Travel to 32 Destinations"
    "The government is still advising against all but essential travel for scores of countries and territories on its red list which include Brazil, Mexico, South Africa and Thailand. "
    UK Drops Advice Against Non-Urgent Travel to 32 Destinations | World News | US News
    The sooner you fall behind, the more time you have to catch up.

  21. #12071
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  22. #12072
    Thailand Expat harrybarracuda's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Buckaroo Banzai View Post
    I might be wrong
    Yep, you are.

    When is the next travel review?

    Since the traffic light system was introduced there have been reviews every three weeks, with countries changing lists based on government assessments of data. Those reviews have normally been on Wednesdays or Thursdays, but the last review came on Friday 17 September, due to the cabinet reshuffle.
    Changes have tended to come into effect at 4am four days after the review, giving people time to get home from a country where rules are changing if required. These regular reviews are set to continue, with the next update expected on either 7 or 8 October.
    Just keep hitting refresh like everyone else

    Red list of countries and territories - GOV.UK

  23. #12073
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    Quote Originally Posted by harrybarracuda View Post
    Yep, you are.



    Just keep hitting refresh like everyone else

    Red list of countries and territories - GOV.UK
    I am not disagreeing with you, I simply don't know. Why then the article posted yesterday says:
    "The government is still advising against all but essential travel for scores of countries and territories on its red list which include Brazil, Mexico, South Africa and Thailand. " ? what do they mean by it?

    I certainly hope Thailand is removed from the red list, and that conditions here improve.
    I really need to travel back to the US and to Greece to take care of some business, and after having been away for a couple of months, when I come back, I want to go straight to my house and to my bed , and not some hotel doing some stupid quarantine.

  24. #12074
    Thailand Expat harrybarracuda's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Buckaroo Banzai View Post
    I am not disagreeing with you, I simply don't know. Why then the article posted yesterday says:
    "The government is still advising against all but essential travel for scores of countries and territories on its red list which include Brazil, Mexico, South Africa and Thailand. " ? what do they mean by it?

    I certainly hope Thailand is removed from the red list, and that conditions here improve.
    I really need to travel back to the US and to Greece to take care of some business, and after having been away for a couple of months, when I come back, I want to go straight to my house and to my bed , and not some hotel doing some stupid quarantine.

    I think you're confused.

    This is the UK's red list.

  25. #12075
    Thailand Expat harrybarracuda's Avatar
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    I hope to fuck they didn't reset the clock on their ASQ...

    SAMUT PRAKAN: About 80 foreign visitors fled from the hotel where they were being quarantined when a fire erupted in the basement on Wednesday night, sending black smoke through the building.
    The fire at the Siam Mandarina Hotel Suvarnabhumi on King Kaew Road in Bang Phli district was reported to Bang Kaeo police station about 9pm.
    Ten fire engines and crews were rushed to the scene. They had the blaze under control in about 30 minutes.
    The fire began in an old snooker club which was being used as a storage room.
    Hotel manager Nattawut Arunanonchai said the club had been closed for nearly two years, since the Covid-19 pandemic began.
    The snooker club did not suffer major damage, police said.
    They found melted wall power outlets and burned wiring in the room, and attributed the blaze to an electrical short circuit.
    There were no injuries.
    The hotel is providing an alternative quarantine service for people arriving from abroad.

    Guests flee fire at quarantine hotel

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