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  1. #7401
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    The head of a trial to see if dogs can be trained to sniff out Covid-19 infection has said that the first animals could be deployed at airports by Christmas.

    Professor James Logan is leading a study to see if dogs, which can already be trained to spot diseases such as cancer, malaria and Parkinson’s, can detect the signs of coronavirus without the need for laboratory testing.

  2. #7402
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    Prime Minister Boris Johnson has said "we must act" to avoid another lockdown as virus cases rise in England.

    He set out a new "rule of six", restricting gatherings to a maximum of six people, enforced by police able to issue fines or make arrests.

    Mr Johnson also outlined a "moonshot" plan to control the virus with mass testing, possibly by next spring.

    It comes as the UK reported another 2,659 coronavirus cases, the fourth day running of over 2,000 reported cases.

    "I want to be absolutely clear, these measures are not another national lockdown. The whole point of them is to avoid a second national lockdown," Mr Johnson said in the first Downing Street coronavirus briefing since July.

    He added "it breaks my heart to have to insist on these restrictions".

    How many cases in your area?
    What are the new rules?
    Will unis be exempt? And other questions
    'It makes children's parties illegal gatherings'
    In the last week, cases have risen from 12.5 infections per 100,000 people to 19.7 per 100,000 across the UK.

    Coronavirus was more prevalent among young people, with 54 cases per 100,000 people in the 19 to 21-year-old age group.

    Mr Johnson also announced that:

    Venues such as pubs and restaurants will be legally required to request contact details of everyone visiting, hold it for 21 days and provide it to NHS Test and Trace. They face fines of £1,000 if they fail to comply
    Business opening hours could be restricted across the whole nation if cases continue to rise. But initially the measure will be limited to local lockdown areas such as Bolton, where venues must close between 22:00 and 05:00
    "Covid-secure marshals" will be introduced to help ensure social distancing in town and city centres
    The passenger locator form, filled out by travellers arriving in the UK to enforce quarantine rules, will be simplified and Border Force will increase enforcement
    Plans to try out larger audiences in venues later this month will be revised, and the government is reviewing its plan to allow spectators back into sports stadiums from 1 October
    Mr Johnson said the rules had "become quite complicated and confusing" and the government was "simplifying and strengthening" them after feedback from police and the public.

    But Labour leader Sir Keir Starmer said the new rules on gatherings were a reflection that "poor communications were a large part of the problem" with the spread of the virus.

    Sir Keir said the government also needed to improve testing, which was "all over the place", following reports that some people have been unable to book tests.

    The prime minister said the government was "working hard" to increase testing capacity to 500,000 tests a day by the end of October, but urged people only to book a test if they had coronavirus symptoms.

    He said they also want to use new types of test "in the near future" to identify people who do not have coronavirus and are not infectious so they can live life "in a more normal way".

    He said these swab or saliva tests could be turned around in 90 or even 20 minutes, with millions processed each day.

    The prime minister evoked the Apollo space programme, describing the "giant collaborative effort" of this testing programme as a "moonshot", which could restore a more normal way of life even if a vaccine or treatment is not available.

    A report in the BMJ said the UK has drawn up plans to carry out up to 10 million Covid-19 tests a day by early next year, at a cost of more than £100bn.

    The Department of Health declined to comment directly on the report, but said it wanted to boost the number of tests with a rapid turnaround time.

    'Behind the scenes, focus is on the vulnerable'
    For all the talk of vaccines and rapid testing, it was clear - certainly listening to UK chief medical adviser Prof Chris Whitty - that this winter will be hard.

    Respiratory viruses tend to do better in the autumn and winter because of the colder weather and the fact people mix indoors more. That is why we see flu cases and, sadly, deaths rise every winter.

    Many experts believe the same will happen in the coming months, despite the latest measures.

    That means the government faces some very difficult decisions. It has to balance the impact of further restrictions - which can harm health in other ways, as well as damage education and the economy - against the risk of letting the virus spread.

    The public has a huge role to play. But on its own that may not be enough.

    Behind the scenes there is lots of focus on how to protect the vulnerable - that could mean locking down care homes and asking people to shield again.

    But the UK is in a stronger position than it was at the start of the pandemic. The lockdown bought us time.

    Better treatments are available and, while many problems remain with testing and tracing, the systems in place are an advance on where we were when the virus first hit the UK.

    These new tests will be piloted with audiences attending indoor and outdoor venues in Salford from next month.

    But the government's chief scientific adviser Sir Patrick Vallance said the technology needed to be "tested carefully" and it would be "completely wrong to assume this is a slam dunk".

    The measures that needed to be taken against coronavirus were "damaging" socially, economically and to people with other health conditions, chief medical officer Prof Chris Whitty acknowledged.

    "We have to do them because the alternative is worse," he said.

    He added that "the period between now and spring is going to be difficult" and people shouldn't see the restrictions "as a very short term thing" because they were unlikely to be lifted after just two or three weeks.

    Mr Johnson said it was "too early to say" if big parties could be held over Christmas, but added that he was "still hopeful" some aspects of life could return to normal by the festive season.

    He said the restrictions would be in place only "as long as necessary".

    "I'm sorry about that. I wish we did not have to take this step, but as your prime minister I must do what is necessary to stop the spread of the virus and save lives," he said.

    The new "rule of six" means:

    Social gatherings of more than six people in England will not be allowed in law from Monday 14 September
    The new rule applies to people in private homes, indoors and outdoors, and places such as pubs, restaurants, cafes and public outdoor spaces
    It applies to all ages
    The rule does not apply to schools and workplaces, to people living together or in the same support bubble, or to weddings, funerals and organised team sports
    The full list of exemptions also includes protests and political activities subject to "strict risk assessments", jury service and providing emergency assistance
    People who ignore the police could be fined £100 - doubling with each offence to a maximum of £3,200
    The chairman of the Metropolitan Police Federation, Ken Marsh, said the new rules were " very flimsy" and would be difficult to enforce.

    At present, the guidance says two households of any size are allowed to meet indoors or outdoors, or up to six people from different households outdoors. Until now the police have had no powers to stop gatherings unless they exceeded 30.

    The number of people allowed to meet inside or outside varies in the UK's four nations. If you are meeting indoors: up to eight people from three different households can meet in Scotland; up to six people from two households in Northern Ireland; up to four households can form an "extended household" in Wales.

  3. #7403
    Thailand Expat jabir's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Troy View Post
    Several European countries with increasing numbers of new infections. I expect another set of restrictions to come into force soon.

    Meanwhile, looks like many high street shops are going to be closing soon. Many here with stock reduced by 60-70% and a vast reduction in staff.

    Can it get worse?

  4. #7404
    Thailand Expat harrybarracuda's Avatar
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    Not surprised. Not surprised at all.

    MOSCOW (Reuters) - Twenty-six scientists, most of them working at universities in Italy, have signed an open letter questioning the reliability of the data presented in the early-stage trial results of the Russian COVID-19 vaccine, named “Sputnik-V”.

    Addressing the editor of The Lancet, the international peer-reviewed medical journal in which Moscow’s Gamaleya Institute published its early-stage trial results, the scientists said they saw patterns in the data that looked “highly unlikely”.

    The letter, published on the personal blog page of one of the signatories, said the Phase I/II trial results data showed multiple participants reporting identical antibody levels.

    “On the ground of simple probabilistic evaluations the fact of observing so many data points preserved among different experiments is highly unlikely,” the open letter said.


    However, the scientists said they were basing their conclusions on summaries of the Russian trial result data, published in the journal, rather than the original data itself.


    “In lack of the original numerical data, no conclusions can be definitively drawn on the reliability of the data presented, especially regarding the apparent duplications detected,” the letter said.


    The Gamaleya Institute, which developed the vaccine, rejected the critique.


    “The published results are authentic and accurate and were examined by five reviewers at The Lancet,” Denis Logunov, a deputy director at the institute, said in a statement.


    He said his institute submitted the entire body of raw data on the trial results to The Lancet.

    “We presented specifically the data that was produced (by the trial), not the data that is supposed to please Italian experts,” Logunov said.


    Naor Bar-Zeev, deputy director at John Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, who peer reviewed the Russian data, defended his analysis of the research.


    “Science must maintain a balance between incredulity, skepticism and trust. That trust is borne out through plausibility, repeatability and falsifiability.”


    “The results are plausible, and not very different to those seen with other AdV vectored products,” he said.


    The researchers had provided more detail than was needed for the review and responded to his questions “intelligently and in a matter-of-fact and confident but understated manner”.


    “Bottom line, I saw no reason to doubt the legitimacy of these results over others I have read and reviewed. But of course one can never know,” he said in an email.


    A spokeswoman for the Lancet said the journal had invited the study’s authors to respond to the questions raised in the open letter. It was following the situation closely, she said.


    Russia published results on Friday of its Phase I/II trial, which included 76 participants and was conducted in June-July this year. Participants developed a positive immune response and no serious side effects, the study’s authors said.

    A Phase III trial, involving 40,000 participants, was launched on Aug. 26. Around 31,000 people have already subscribed to take part, Health Minister Mikhail Murashko said.
    Some scientists spot 'unlikely' patterns in Russia vaccine data: letter - Reuters

  5. #7405
    Thailand Expat jabir's Avatar
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    A Russian vaccine released ahead of western vaccines at this early stage would probably end up killing more people than it saves, but those numbers will get lost in the mix.

  6. #7406
    Thailand Expat harrybarracuda's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jabir View Post
    A Russian vaccine released ahead of western vaccines at this early stage would probably end up killing more people than it saves, but those numbers will get lost in the mix.

    The arrogance of the fucks though.


    “We presented specifically the data that was produced (by the trial), not the data that is supposed to please Italian experts,” Logunov said.

  7. #7407
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  8. #7408
    Thailand Expat jabir's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by harrybarracuda View Post
    The arrogance of the fucks though.
    The common goal is to develop an effective vaccine, and of course there are financial incentives in the private sector, but western culture and mindset at gov-run research facilities lean toward sharing data with the common good in mind. Imo this is another instance of politeness being welcomed and unrequited by the likes of China and Russia, which get a running start without having to do too much.

    Add to that the likelihood of infiltration, and these pariahs probably have the immense advantage of virtually all data from both public and private sectors.

  9. #7409
    Thailand Expat harrybarracuda's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jabir View Post
    The common goal is to develop an effective vaccine, and of course there are financial incentives in the private sector, but western culture and mindset at gov-run research facilities lean toward sharing data with the common good in mind. Imo this is another instance of politeness being welcomed and unrequited by the likes of China and Russia, which get a running start without having to do too much.

    Add to that the likelihood of infiltration, and these pariahs probably have the immense advantage of virtually all data from both public and private sectors.
    Well despite the financial cost, you saw above AstraZeneca stopped the trial while examining the anomaly.

    You know both the chinkies and russians would cover that shit up, which is probably why the Italians think they have fudged the data.

  10. #7410
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    •While Saudi infection rates are dropping, there are a number of countries that supply Saudi Arabia with labor – especially India – where the COVID infection rates are going through the roof. Keeping airspace closed to foreigners may be a move to protect the Kingdom.
    • The Saudi government will be hosting a number of global high-profile events in the next few months. The Future Investment Initiative will be held (virtually) in late October, and the G-20 will be held (in person) in Riyadh on Nov. 21-22. The Kingdom government may keep airspace closed in order to keep the COVID situation stable until these events are concluded.
    • Mid-October is the start of the seasonal flu season. The Ministry of Health may be restricting travel to ensure that these two respiratory illnesses don’t overwhelm Saudi hospitals.
    Looks to be a few more months at minimum before getting a break from the sandpit.

  11. #7411
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    Quote Originally Posted by jabir View Post
    The common goal is to develop an effective vaccine, and of course there are financial incentives in the private sector, but western culture and mindset at gov-run research facilities lean toward sharing data with the common good in mind. Imo this is another instance of politeness being welcomed and unrequited by the likes of China and Russia, which get a running start without having to do too much.

    Add to that the likelihood of infiltration, and these pariahs probably have the immense advantage of virtually all data from both public and private sectors.
    I think you will find that vaccine developers are sharing their results, no one is sharing their recipe.

  12. #7412
    Thailand Expat harrybarracuda's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Iceman123 View Post
    I think you will find that vaccine developers are sharing their results, no one is sharing their recipe.
    Actually there are plenty of collaborations going on.

    Sanofi and GSK, Novavax and Takeda, and then there are all those companies that have collaborated with the chinkies (although they might not know it yet).

  13. #7413
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    Quote Originally Posted by harrybarracuda View Post
    Actually there are plenty of collaborations going on.

    Sanofi and GSK, Novavax and Takeda, and then there are all those companies that have collaborated with the chinkies (although they might not know it yet).
    Big difference between strategic collaborations and the sharing of results with competition.

    I don’t think the “chinkies” have needed to collaborate with anyone. Their vaccine appears to be based upon good science.

  14. #7414
    Thailand Expat jabir's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Iceman123 View Post
    I think you will find that vaccine developers are sharing their results, no one is sharing their recipe.
    The western mindset is toward developing a vaccine that works, there's tons of money and glory for first past the post, but leaders handled it so badly early on that right now all they want is some respite which won't be coming without a vaccine as there's no sign of the virus dying off naturally. To this end, having lost trillions, a few unproductive millions or billions toward the end goal is delicious.

    The Russian/Chinese mindset is to legally and illicitly harvest the efforts of others which they do well, thinking fcuk me we can clean up here! In regard to the recipe, sure they could get lucky and do it alone, but I suspect whatever end products these two come up with will be based on the secret recipes of others.

  15. #7415
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    Not big news in the scheme of things, but this was the school I went to.

    It was called Churchill Comprehensive back in the day.


    Coronavirus: Churchill Academy pupils sent home after Covid-19 case


    Coronavirus: Churchill Academy pupils sent home after Covid-19 case - BBC News






  16. #7416
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    ^^ So knights in shining armour vs slant eyed cheats, eh?

    Yeah, that's not simplistic at all.


  17. #7417
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    The UK government's guidelines are achieving the almost impressive feat of making even less sense now than they did five months ago. There's next to no trust left in these idiots.

    Pregnant women are still not allowed to take a partner with them for scans and appointments, or even have someone with them for early labour, so you can go for a pint with your beloved, but you will be on your own when you first hear your baby’s heartbeat.
    Booze battles: how the pub became the focus for pandemic Britain’s culture wars | Coronavirus outbreak | The Guardian

  18. #7418
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    Letting you all know that I've volunteered for the Russian vaccine trials.
    I received my first shot at 14:30. It’s completely safe with иo side effects whatsoeveя, and that I feelshκι χoρoshό я чувствую себя немного странно и я думаю, что вытащил ослиные уши.






















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  19. #7419
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    Quote Originally Posted by jabir View Post
    The Russian/Chinese mindset is to legally and illicitly harvest the efforts of others which they do well
    So, they have stolen it from Oxford and it's OK in Russia but not in UK. Now awaiting the loads of dead people in Russia - and also TD volunteers either...

  20. #7420
    Thailand Expat harrybarracuda's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Iceman123 View Post
    Big difference between strategic collaborations and the sharing of results with competition.
    When they are collaborating, they are partnering, not competing.

    I don’t think the “chinkies” have needed to collaborate with anyone. Their vaccine appears to be based upon good science.

    Of course it is. And as with anything else, it's science they've systematically stolen from the West over the years.

  21. #7421
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    The COVID-2019 Thread-ce9c64fe-4e29-409f-a6f6-913ba954f5b2-jpgSounds promising....

  22. #7422
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    The testing centres in the uk are overwhelmed at the moment.
    Tried and failed to get an appointment all morning, so now my whole household has to isolate for 5 days.

  23. #7423
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    But, but........Britain has the bestest test regime in the whole wide world. BoJo the Clown has said so.

    You must be doing something wrong.

  24. #7424
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    Quote Originally Posted by harrybarracuda View Post


    Of course it is. And as with anything else, it's science they've systematically stolen from the West over the years.
    I presume that it would be rude to ask you for any proof of this.

  25. #7425
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    Harriet’s best left alone when on a ‘chinkie’ rant.

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