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  1. #7351
    Thailand Expat harrybarracuda's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by deeks View Post
    I have to say though, The one thing Covid has done is declined all the deaths from Influenza, Bronchitis, Lung Cancer, and motorbike accidents.

    newsweek.com

    All of which makes sense, since people are mixing less, smoking less, and travelling less.

  2. #7352
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    You were 6 times more likely to get flu or pneumonia last week in the UK and yesterday's death rate was...1 person out of 60 million people.

    Despite Harry's constant doomsday attitude, I think most of us can be pretty confident that we'll survive this one.

    Some science stats for you regarding the lethality (the more contagious a virus is, the less deadly it is, so):

    COVID: very contagious and not really dangerous at all: somewhere below 1% of people who were going to die anyway

    SARS: 11-16%

    MERS: 30-35%

    Ebola: 50-80%

  3. #7353
    Thailand Expat harrybarracuda's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by hallelujah View Post
    You were 6 times more likely to get flu or pneumonia last week in the UK and yesterday's death rate was...1 person out of 60 million people.

    Despite Harry's constant doomsday attitude, I think most of us can be pretty confident that we'll survive this one.

    Some science stats for you regarding the lethality (the more contagious a virus is, the less deadly it is, so):

    COVID: very contagious and not really dangerous at all: somewhere below 1% of people who were going to die anyway

    SARS: 11-16%

    MERS: 30-35%

    Ebola: 50-80%
    This is a news thread, which requires you to post a link when you make random claims.

    There is a reason for that.

    However, straight off the bat, none of the last three you posted had the global reach of this one.

    SARS: 26 countries.

    Not contagious until the patient is symptomatic.

    MERS: 27 countries

    Hardly any cases reported outside the healthcare environment, i.e. close contact.

    Ebola: 8 Countries

    Lasts no more than 30 seconds outside bodily fluids, so it is nowhere near as communicable as any of the others.

    There are more factors that contribute to a virus' lethality than simply infection. Its ability to spread is what is key.

    As for the flu, even if it was a six times more likely to infect you than Covid:


    Maybe you can back up your claims with some science?

  4. #7354
    The Bestest Expat Plan B's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by hallelujah View Post
    COVID: very contagious and not really dangerous at all: somewhere below 1% of people who were going to die anyway

    It's still a concern for the oldies on this forum. It's very possible that it'll take them a couple years earlier than they would've liked.
    For others the jury is still out on how many have survived with damage to internal organs. Those are the numbers that will take a longer time to ascertain and is why it's still a bit scary.
    Dear Anti-vaxers: Enjoy your free trial.

  5. #7355
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    Quote Originally Posted by Plan B View Post
    It's still a concern for the oldies on this forum. It's very possible that it'll take them a couple years earlier than they would've liked.
    For others the jury is still out on how many have survived with damage to internal organs. Those are the numbers that will take a longer time to ascertain and is why it's still a bit scary.
    My dad's mate, 65 with heart problems, was diagnosed 2 weeks ago. He was given the all clear this weekend and didn't have a sniffle.

    8 in 10 don't have any symptoms.

    Look after the most vulnerable, yes, but it's a nasty bug at most for the odd one in 200. Nothing more.

  6. #7356
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    Indeed, but the panic and damage to the global economy will last a decade.

  7. #7357
    Thailand Expat harrybarracuda's Avatar
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    So a mate of mine has landed today in Swampy.

    Six checkpoints and a medical questionnaire later (he had all the right paperwork) and he's in his Quarantine hotel for two weeks....

    Only to find it's DRY!

    I reckon the fucking sheets are getting knotted together as we speak.




    Added: People got bumped off the flight for not having the right paperwork or having a fever.

    Some cunto got bumped because he had everything on his laptop and hadn't bothered printing anything.

    What a time to try and be a smartarse....
    Last edited by harrybarracuda; 01-09-2020 at 07:24 PM.

  8. #7358
    Thailand Expat misskit's Avatar
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    Government Ready for a Second COVID-19 Outbreak

    The Ministry of Public Health has assured the public it is fully prepared if Thailand has to face a second outbreak of COVID-19 infections in the wake of cases reappearing in several countries.


    Deputy secretary-general of the Food and Drug Administration, Dr Surachoke Tangwiwat confirmed there are adequate supplies of medicines, pharmaceuticals, personal protective equipment (PPE) and N95 masks for all hospitals nationwide.


    Dr Tangwiwat said currently Thailand has 629,122 pills of the antiviral drug Favipiravir for 8,900 patients, Remdesivir reserves for 33 patients, more than 2.3 million N95 masks for 15,000 patients, over 1.16 million PPE suits for 7,700 patients and 45.44 million surgical masks for 100 days.


    There are 45 face mask factories with the capacity to manufacture 3.41 million face masks a day, he said.


    Specialist of the Government Pharmaceutical Organization (GPO), Nanthakarn Suwanpidokkul said the GPO now had 590,200 pills of Favipiravir and was in the process of developing the medicine itself. It was expected that the GPO’s Favipiravir would be registered mid-2021, she said.


    The GPO and Biotech are collaborating to conduct research on raw materials for the production of Favipiravir. The GPO is also working with many sectors in Thailand and other countries to develop and produce vaccines.


    The Centre for COVID-19 Situation Administration reported a single new case of the novel coronavirus on Monday, a 29-year-old British woman, raising the accumulated total in Thailand to 3,412.


    The woman tested positive for COVID-19 on her second test during state quarantine.

    Government Ready for a Second COVID-19 Outbreak | Chiang Mai One

  9. #7359
    Thailand Expat misskit's Avatar
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    Third virus vaccine reaches major hurdle: Final U.S. testing

    A handful of the dozens of experimental Covid-19 vaccines in human testing have reached the last and biggest hurdle — looking for the needed proof that they really work.


    AstraZeneca announced Monday its vaccine candidate has entered the final testing stage in the U.S. The Cambridge, England-based company said the study will involve up to 30,000 adults from various racial, ethnic and geographic groups.


    Two other vaccine candidates began final testing this summer in tens of thousands of people in the U.S. One was created by the National Institutes of Health and manufactured by Moderna Inc., and the other developed by Pfizer Inc. and Germany’s BioNTech.

    MORE Third virus vaccine reaches major hurdle: Final U.S. testing - POLITICO

  10. #7360
    Thailand Expat harrybarracuda's Avatar
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    Aren't these the ones that fucked up the Dengue vaccine?

    French pharma giant Sanofi said that international Phase 3 clinical tests of its Kevzara drug for serious Covid-19 cases had proved inconclusive and it was halting the trial.
    The Phase 3 test - normally the last before official approval for use - "did not meet the primary or secondary evaluation criteria compared with a placebo, and in both cases, compared with established hospital care," it said in a statement.
    Sanofi said neither it nor its American partner in developing the drug, Regeneron, "envisage further clinical tests of Kevzara for the treatment of Covid-19."
    Although Kevzara "did not give us the results we were hoping for, we are proud of the work done by our team," Sanofi global research head John Reed said in the statement.
    Sanofi halts trial of Covid-19 drug after tests

  11. #7361
    Thailand Expat harrybarracuda's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by misskit View Post
    Third virus vaccine reaches major hurdle: Final U.S. testing

    A handful of the dozens of experimental Covid-19 vaccines in human testing have reached the last and biggest hurdle — looking for the needed proof that they really work.


    AstraZeneca announced Monday its vaccine candidate has entered the final testing stage in the U.S. The Cambridge, England-based company said the study will involve up to 30,000 adults from various racial, ethnic and geographic groups.


    Two other vaccine candidates began final testing this summer in tens of thousands of people in the U.S. One was created by the National Institutes of Health and manufactured by Moderna Inc., and the other developed by Pfizer Inc. and Germany’s BioNTech.

    MORE Third virus vaccine reaches major hurdle: Final U.S. testing - POLITICO
    The problem is that far more testing is required to see if there are any adverse effects in some recipients, c.f. Rotashield
    which lasted a year before it was taken off the market. I think the shortest period of testing for a major vaccine was four years for Mumps.

  12. #7362
    Thailand Expat harrybarracuda's Avatar
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    Beyond its scientific backing, the notion that a COVID-19 patient might wind up with long-term lung scarring or breathing issues has the ring of truth. After all, we hear the stories, right? The virus can leave survivors explaining how they struggled to breathe, or how it can feel, in the words of actress Alyssa Milano, “like an elephant is sitting on my chest.”

    We’ve also known for a while that some COVID-19 patients’ hearts are taking a beating, too—but over the past few weeks, the evidence has strengthened that cardiac damage can happen even among people who have never displayed symptoms of coronavirus infection. And these frightening findings help explain why college and professional sports leagues are proceeding with special caution as they make decisions about whether or not to play.

    From an offensive lineman at Indiana University dealing with possible heart issues to a University of Houston player opting out of the season because of “complications with my heart,” the news has been coming fast and furiously. More than a dozen athletes at Power Five conference schools have been identified as having myocardial injury following coronavirus infection, according to ESPN; two of the conferences—the Big Ten and the Pac-12—already have announced they are postponing all competitive sports until 2021. And in Major League Baseball, Boston Red Sox ace pitcher Eduardo Rodriguez told reporters that he felt “100 years old” as a result of his bout with COVID, and of MLB’s shortened season because of myocarditis—an inflammation of the heart muscle, often triggered by a virus. Said Rodriguez: “That’s [the heart is] the most important part of your body, so when you hear that … I was kind of scared a little. Now that I know what it is, it’s still scary.”


    Why are these athletes (and their leagues and conferences) taking such extreme precautions? It’s because of the stakes. Though it often resolves without incident, myocarditis can lead to severe complications such as abnormal heart rhythms, chronic heart failure and even sudden death. Just a few weeks ago, a former Florida State basketball player, Michael Ojo, died of suspected heart complications just after recovering from a bout of COVID-19 in Serbia, where he was playing pro ball.


    Here’s the background: Myocarditis appears to result from the direct infection of the virus attacking the heart, or possibly as a consequence of the inflammation triggered by the body’s overly aggressive immune response. And it is not age-specific: In The Lancet, doctors recently reported on an 11-year-old child with multisystem inflammatory syndrome (MIS-C)—a rare illness—who died of myocarditis and heart failure. At autopsy, pathologists were able to identify coronavirus particles present in the child’s cardiac tissue, helping to explain the virus’ direct involvement in her death. In fact, researchers are reporting the presence of viral protein in the actual heart muscle, of six deceased patients. Of note is the fact that these patients were documented to have died of lung failure, having had neither clinical signs of heart involvement, nor a prior history of cardiac disease.


    Ossama Samuel, associate chief of cardiology at Mount Sinai Beth Israel in New York, told me about a cluster of younger adults developing myocarditis, some of them a month or so after they had recovered from COVID-19. One patient, who developed myocarditis four weeks after believing he had recovered from the virus, responded to a course of steroid treatment only to develop a recurrence in the form of pericarditis (an inflammation of the sac surrounding the heart). A second patient, in her 40s, now has reduced heart function from myocarditis, and a third—an athletic man in his 40s—is experiencing recurring and dangerous ventricular heart rhythms, necessitating that he wear a LifeVest defibrillator for protection. His MRI also demonstrates fibrosis and scarring of his heart muscle, which may be permanent, and he may ultimately require placement of a permanent defibrillator.


    This is an incredibly tricky diagnosis. Patients with myocarditis often experience symptoms like shortness of breath, chest pain, fever and fatigue—while some have no symptoms at all. J.N., a health care provider who asked that his full name not be used, told me that COVID-19 symptoms first appeared in his case in late March. He ultimately was hospitalized at Mount Sinai Medical Center after developing unrelenting fevers spiking to 104 degrees, chest tightness, nausea, vomiting and diarrhea.


    “Even the Advil and acetaminophen wouldn’t help my fevers,” said J.N. Just 34 years old, he was diagnosed with COVID-induced myocarditis and severe heart failure. Doctors admitted him to the intensive care unit and placed him on a lifesaving intra-aortic balloon pump due to the very poor function of his heart. He spent two weeks in the hospital, has suffered recurrences since his discharge, and now says, “I’m very careful. I’m very concerned about the length of time I’ve been feeling sick, and if these symptoms are lifelong or will go away anytime soon.” J.N. said that everyday activities, like carrying his one-year-old daughter up a flight of stairs, leave him feeling winded and fatigued. He has been unable to work since March.


    According to some reports, as many as 7 percent of deaths from COVID-19 may result from myocarditis. (Others feel that estimate is too high.) The arrhythmia that sometimes accompanies it is also worrisome, and researchers have found that to be fairly common among COVID-19 patients. In J.N.’s case, he noticed his heart racing on several occasions into the 130 beats per minute range. And while the prevalence of this in virus patients is not known exactly, a study found that ventricular arrhythmias occurred in 78 percent of patients without COVID-19, with up to 30 percent of them experiencing serious arrhythmias 27 months later.


    Experts estimate that half of myocarditis cases resolve without a chronic complication, but several studies suggest that COVID-19 patients show signs of the condition months after contracting the virus. One non–peer reviewed study, involving 139 health care workers who developed coronavirus infection and recovered, found that about 10 weeks after their initial symptoms, 37 percent of them were diagnosed with myocarditis or myopericarditis—and fewer than half of those had showed symptoms at the time of their scans.


    Any such cardiac sequelae lingering weeks to months after the fact is clearly concerning, and we’re seeing more evidence of it. A German study found that 78 percent of recovered COVID-19 patients, the majority of whom had only mild to moderate symptoms, demonstrated cardiac involvement more than two months after their initial diagnoses. Six in 10 were found to have persistent myocardial inflammation. While emphasizing that individual patients need not be nervous, lead investigator Elike Nagel added in an e-mail, “My personal take is that COVID will increase the incidence of heart failure over the next decades.”


    https://www.scientificamerican.com/a...-any-symptoms/

  13. #7363
    Pedantic bastard
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    Quote Originally Posted by harrybarracuda View Post
    The problem is that far more testing is required to see if there are any adverse effects in some recipients, c.f. Rotashield
    which lasted a year before it was taken off the market. I think the shortest period of testing for a major vaccine was four years for Mumps.
    If I recall correctly, yellow fever two years, polio three years.

  14. #7364
    Thailand Expat harrybarracuda's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by nidhogg View Post
    If I recall correctly, yellow fever two years, polio three years.
    From some cursory research, Salk spent seven years working on the Polio vaccine and it was trialled on 1,800,000 children.

    As for Yellow Fever, Theiler was already working on the vaccine in 1930, and it didn't enter use until 1937. *


    * Although it does rather look like they used the Brazilians for Phase III trials!

  15. #7365
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    My wife is returning to Thailand from Seattle in a couple of weeks. She had to register for travel through the Thai Embassy and coordinate her travel around an approved schedule of available flights and carriers. After she arrives she will have to spend 2 weeks in quarantine before she can travel home to Surin. She is staying a month and then has to return to the US where she will have to quarantine for another 2 weeks before she can return to work.
    This post has not been authorized by the TeakDoor censorship committee.

  16. #7366
    Thailand Expat misskit's Avatar
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    Hope it goes as planned, Humberto. I spoke with my Thai friend who has been stranded in France since March. She has had several flights planned but all were canceled at the last minute. Her last canceled flight was at the end of August. Still in France.

  17. #7367
    Thailand Expat harrybarracuda's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Humbert View Post
    My wife is returning to Thailand from Seattle in a couple of weeks. She had to register for travel through the Thai Embassy and coordinate her travel around an approved schedule of available flights and carriers. After she arrives she will have to spend 2 weeks in quarantine before she can travel home to Surin. She is staying a month and then has to return to the US where she will have to quarantine for another 2 weeks before she can return to work.
    See above: Having the right paperwork in paper form is absolutely critical. And tell her not to bother travelling if she has a fever, even if it's unrelated.

    If she is in government quarantine, even a hotel, and she wants a drink, tell her to head to the airport early and get some duty free

  18. #7368
    Thailand Expat harrybarracuda's Avatar
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    I can definitely relate to this. I've been WFH since May and maintaining my sleep pattern is a lot of work.


    Sleep quality has declined since COVID-19 lockdown, particularly among those working from home
    BY BETH ELLWOOD SEPTEMBER 1, 2020

    Findings published in the Journal of Translational Medicine suggest that Italians have suffered a reduction in sleep quality since the beginning of the pandemic, characterized by changes in sleep efficiency, sleep onset latency, sleep disturbances, and daytime dysfunction. These adverse changes were more pronounced in those who were remote working.

    As the COVID-19 pandemic struck Italy, the country, like many others, went into intense lockdown. Study authors Luigi Barrea and colleagues describe how this unprecedented quarantine drastically altered citizens’ daily lives, altering their grocery shopping habits, reducing their opportunities for physical activity, and leaving many citizens working from home.

    Barrea and colleagues wanted to see how these changes may have impacted citizens’ sleeping habits and possibly affected their Body Mass Index (BMI).

    In a retrospective study, data was obtained from 121 men and women between the ages of 18 and 65. Data was collected at baseline, before any quarantine, and again 40 days after lockdown. Participants’ BMI was calculated, and their quality of sleep was assessed using the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI).

    Results revealed that, overall, participants showed a significant increase in PSQI score — indicating worse sleep — following the 40 days of quarantine. When it came to specific aspects of sleep, participants showed increased sleep disturbance and daytime dysfunction, less efficient sleep, and an increase in the time it took them to fall asleep.

    Interestingly, those who reported ‘smart working’ — using technology to work from home —showed a greater loss in sleep quality than those who did not. While this effect was found for both genders, the effect was strongest in men. The authors point out that the use of smart devices has been strongly linked to poor sleep. Working from home may lead to increased screen time, including time spent in front of the computer or television screen late at night, which can impact sleep quality.

    Next, subjects’ BMI was found to increase, overall, after the quarantine. As the authors point out, limited shopping excursions likely led people towards unhealthy food choices, such as more processed food and less fresh fruits and vegetables. These food choices may also have affected participants’ quality of sleep, as energy intake from fats and snacks has been linked to poorer sleep. Unsurprisingly, participants also reported reduced physical activity during the lockdown.

    The researchers address how stress related to the pandemic likely affected participants’ sleep, creating a destructive cycle. Stress releases cortisol in the body, and hypercortisolism has been linked to interrupted sleep, fewer hours of sleep, and reduced slow-wave sleep. In turn, poor sleep can exacerbate hypercortisolism, contributing to an endless cycle.

    The study was limited since it did not include an analysis of subjects’ diet. Nevertheless, the authors suggest that “consuming food containing or promoting the synthesis of serotonin and melatonin at dinner such as roots, leaves, fruits, and seeds such as almonds, bananas, cherries, and oats” may help mitigate sleep disturbances during quarantine.

    The study, “Does Sars‑Cov‑2 threaten our dreams? Effect of quarantine on sleep quality and body mass index”, was authored by Luigi Barrea, Gabriella Pugliese, Lydia Framondi, Rossana Di Matteo, Daniela Laudisio, Silvia Savastano, Annamaria Colao, and Giovanna Muscogiuri.
    Sleep quality has declined since COVID-19 lockdown, particularly among those working from home


  19. #7369
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    Quote Originally Posted by harrybarracuda View Post
    Having the right paperwork in paper form is absolutely critical
    You can't fly unless you have gone through the Thai governments online registration and approval process which she has already done.

  20. #7370
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    Quote Originally Posted by Humbert View Post
    You can't fly unless you have gone through the Thai governments online registration and approval process which she has already done.
    As a post script, at least the list of hotels she can quarantine at are all five star. All at governement expense.

  21. #7371
    Thailand Expat AntRobertson's Avatar
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    So apparently 37% of Americans believe the U.S. has handled the pandemic better than Canada -- i.e. they think a nation with circa. 185,000 deaths is doing better than one with circa. 9,000.

    Poll finds a third of Americans think they handled COVID-19 better than Canada, and are also delusional | The Star

    Fair to assume that of that 37% there are 100% that are Trump supporters.

  22. #7372
    Hangin' Around cyrille's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Humbert View Post
    My wife is returning to Thailand from Seattle in a couple of weeks. She had to register for travel through the Thai Embassy and coordinate her travel around an approved schedule of available flights and carriers. After she arrives she will have to spend 2 weeks in quarantine before she can travel home to Surin
    Quote Originally Posted by Humbert View Post
    You can't fly unless you have gone through the Thai governments online registration and approval process which she has already done.

    Quote Originally Posted by Humbert View Post
    As a post script, at least the list of hotels she can quarantine at are all five star. All at governement expense.
    So it won't be like this government quarantine for Thai travellers then?


  23. #7373
    Elite Mumbler
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    Quote Originally Posted by Humbert View Post
    As a post script, at least the list of hotels she can quarantine at are all five star. All at governement expense.
    A Thai friend of mine recently returned to Thailand from the States and had to quarantine in one. The food is definitely not 5 star, looked to be 1 star. Rice and a sliced up hot dog was common.

  24. #7374
    Hangin' Around cyrille's Avatar
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    The prospect of the Thai government footing the bill for top jolly accommodation and food for anyone but themselves seems...highly unlikely.

  25. #7375
    Thailand Expat harrybarracuda's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Humbert View Post
    You can't fly unless you have gone through the Thai governments online registration and approval process which she has already done.
    Yes yes, Certificate of Entry etc.

    What I'm saying is print it all out.

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