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  1. #7251
    Thailand Expat harrybarracuda's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jabir View Post
    Just the latest in a series of reports of contaminated food products, Covid-19 was found in chicken wings exported from Brazil to China, which opens up a whole new can of worms not knowing which side to believe on the origin of the contamination, whether it occurred at source or processing, transportation or storage, are these isolated incidents, or has the virus mutated allowing transmission through food, or more scary has it always been able to do that, either way how much contaminated food has already moved across borders, and much more before we even touch on technical stuff.

    And then we can speculate on how our historically incompetent govs might react to this new threat.

    Chicken wings test positive for Covid-19 in China, but there's no evidence of food transmission, experts say - CNN
    NZ reckon their new cases might have come from food imports. The first case was of this new infection was a cold store worker.

  2. #7252
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    Troy's Avatar
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    Ban food imports next...then ban food...

  3. #7253
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    Quote Originally Posted by cyrille View Post
    the 'protect yourself against foreigners' standby.
    Especially the French.
    555

  4. #7254
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    Quote Originally Posted by harrybarracuda View Post
    NZ reckon their new cases might have come from food imports. The first case was of this new infection was a cold store worker.
    Lets wait and see. The stupid kunts were not testing airport, quarantine and Port staff to any great extent. Just fucking dumb, when you consider that all the cases that we have had over the last 100 days have been returning Kiwis. How hard can it be? We live on a couple of small islands at the bottom of the pacific with fuck all flights...

  5. #7255
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    How the Pandemic Revealed Britain’s National Illness
    Boris Johnson has faced his share of blame for the country’s death count. But the British system was failing long before the coronavirus struck.

    Below the link and opening paragraphs from The Atlantic article

    Why Britain Failed Its Coronavirus Test - The Atlantic

    Faced with the coronavirus pandemic, Britain’s leaders asked their people to do three things, captured in one pithy slogan: “Stay home. Protect the NHS. Save lives.”
    On the first of those edicts, Britons largely followed through. Main streets, town centers, and public spaces were mostly abandoned, and the government pulled together a far-reaching job-protection program, ensuring that those who feared losing their jobs felt safe enough to not go to work.
    The second request was more unusual. During the pandemic, Britain was the only major country in the world to make protecting its National Health Service a central goal. Signs and placards went up outside people’s homes, declaring their appreciation. The words thank you nhs can now be seen on sidewalks and soccer jerseys, in children’s bedrooms and even, until recently, the windows of 10 Downing Street. In part, this worked. The NHS adapted to the crisis at extraordinary speed, creating the emergency capacity required to deal with the surge of patients. When Prime Minister Boris Johnson was released from the hospital after contracting COVID-19, he said that Britain was winning its battle against the disease because the public had “formed a human shield around this country’s greatest national asset,” the NHS.
    On the third count, however, the country did not succeed, certainly compared with almost any other developed nation. Britain did not save as many lives as others. It had the money, the tools, and the wherewithal to respond as well as any, yet more of its people died than anywhere else in Europe….
    ……………

  6. #7256
    Thailand Expat misskit's Avatar
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    South Korea capital returns to tougher social distancing rules as virus cases spike

    SEOUL (Reuters) – South Korea reported 166 new coronavirus cases as of Friday, of which 155 were domestic, prompting the reimposition of tighter social distancing curbs in Seoul area as authorities worried about the spectre of a fresh wave of the disease.


    South Korea used invasive tracing and widespread testing to contain its first outbreak of the novel coronavirus, but Asia’s fourth-largest economy has experienced persistent outbreaks in recent weeks, mostly in the densely populated capital area.


    For the second day in a row in over four months, the country has reported a sudden jump in locally transmitted cases, the Korea Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (KCDC) said.


    The new cases took South Korea’s tally to 15,039 with 305 deaths by Friday midnight. The recent spike in infections are emerging in multiple church gatherings.


    The authorities decided to upgrade the social distancing guidelines to second stage for Seoul and nearby Gyeonggi province, Prime Minister Chung Sye-kyun told a meeting on Saturday.


    “We are facing a desperately dangerous situation that could lead to another wave of epidemics if we cannot overcome this crisis,” said Chung.


    Health authorities had categorized social distancing rules in three stages – stage 1 being the least intense and stage 3 the toughest, where schools and businesses are urged to close.


    Second stage limits indoor gatherings to below 50 and outdoor gatherings to below 100, and bans spectators in sports matches, disappointing fans who had just gone back into baseball and soccer stadiums after a five-week delay to the season.

    South Korea capital returns to tougher social distancing rules as virus cases spike – Thai PBS World

  7. #7257
    Thailand Expat jabir's Avatar
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    I think they should try something novel like do what we say or get nicked, if that's not considered too savage for voter consumption.

    Must say, the more we learn about freedoms and rights in the developed world being used to sabotage efforts to protect people from each other, the less onerous it feels living under a junta.

  8. #7258
    Thailand Expat harrybarracuda's Avatar
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    South Koreans protest against Covid management, demanding their "freedumb".

    Of course it is being led by stupid fucking god botherers again.


    The COVID-2019 Thread-aen20200815002351320_03_i_p2-jpg

    (LEAD) Liberation Day demonstrations take place amid sharp upturn in COVID-19 infections | Yonhap News Agency

  9. #7259
    Thailand Expat harrybarracuda's Avatar
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    Grab a coffee....

    Thousands of letters stuffed with money flooded Jonas Salk’s mailbox the week after his polio vaccine was declared safe and effective in 1955. Everybody wanted his vaccine. Desperate parents clogged doctors’ phone lines in search of the precious elixir; drug companies and doctors diverted doses to the rich and famous.

    Some of the first batches of the vaccine were disastrously botched, causing 200 cases of permanent paralysis. That barely dented public desire for the preventive. Marlon Brando even asked to play Salk in a movie.

    Eight years later, with polio a fading threat, the first measles vaccines went on sale. Measles had killed more than 400 children the year before and caused permanent brain damage in thousands more. Interest in the vaccine was modest. Its creator, Maurice Hilleman, was never lionized as Salk had been.

    “People felt, ‘What’s the big deal? I had measles; why does my kid need a vaccine?’ It was a very difficult sell,” said Walter Orenstein, an Emory University professor who headed the national immunization program at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention from 1988 to 2004.

    When a coronavirus vaccine becomes available, will it be met with a roaring ovation, like the polio vaccine, or communal yawning, like the measles shot? Or some strange hybrid of the two?

    Americans’ trust in authority, affordable access to the vaccine, and a sense of solidarity will determine the result, said Orenstein and other public health veterans and historians.

    Perceptions of particular diseases—and vaccines—reflect the seriousness of the diseases themselves, but popular values, culture, human risk assessment, and politics all play important roles. Acceptance of public health measures—be they face masks or vaccines—is never entirely determined through a rational balancing of risk and benefit.

    We can see that in the history of national campaigns for new vaccines meant to vanquish a scourge. No disease was more feared in the mid-20th century than polio. With the possible exception of AIDS, no disease since has been as feared until the arrival of COVID-19.

    The polio vaccine was one of the few the public greeted eagerly. Diseases like measles and whooping cough were familiar childhood afflictions. In most years they killed more children than polio, but polio, which put people in iron lungs and leg braces, was visible in ways that an infant’s death certificate, tucked away in a drawer, could never be.

    Vaccines are often a hard sell, since they prevent rather than cure disease and seem scary even though they are generally quite safe. Since vaccines must be widely used to prevent outbreaks, successful vaccination campaigns rely heavily on trust in those who sell, recommend, and administer the medicines. And trust in science, government, and business has not always been in steady supply.

    In the late 1800s and early 1900s, when public health laws were in flux, authorities battling smallpox epidemics would often send vaccinators out with police to enforce the jab. They’d enter factories where cases had been reported, lock the doors, and frog-march the workers through a vaccination line. The workers’ resistance was not unmerited; the vaccine sometimes caused swollen arms, fever, and bacterial infections. Vaccination could cost a week’s missed wages.

    Authorities had learned their lesson by the 1920s, when the diphtheria vaccine came on the scene, as James Colgrove notes in his book State of Immunity: The Politics of Vaccination in Twentieth-Century America. Diphtheria was a much-feared killer of children, and publicity campaigns run by public health officials, insurance companies, and charities sought to educate and persuade rather than coerce.

    Polio terrified Americans, peaking in 1952 with more than 57,000 cases. In 1938, President Franklin D. Roosevelt, himself a polio patient, had begun a national scientific program to battle the disease, backed by millions of Americans’ contributions through the March of Dimes.

    The result of this national quest, uniting government and the people, was Jonas Salk’s inactivated polio vaccine. It cemented a powerful post-World War II trust in the U.S. scientific and medical establishment that would endure for many years.

    Social solidarity was also important.

    Vaccines prevent the circulation of a disease among the unvaccinated via what scientists call herd immunity—if enough people are vaccinated. When a reliable rubella vaccine became available in 1969, states quickly required childhood vaccination, even though rubella was practically harmless in children. They wanted to protect a vulnerable population—pregnant women—to prevent a repeat of the 1963-64 congenital rubella epidemic, which resulted in 30,000 fetal deaths and the birth of more than 20,000 babies with severe disabilities.

    The embrace of the rubella vaccine, as historian Elena Conis of the University of California-Berkeley notes in her book, Vaccine Nation: America’s Changing Relationship With Immunization, marked the first time a vaccine had been deployed that offered no direct benefit to those who were vaccinated.

    Still, it took a combination of fear, solidarity, and coercion for Orenstein and his colleagues at the CDC and state public health agencies to drive childhood vaccination rates for measles, whooping cough, rubella, and diphtheria to 90 percent and above in the 1990s to assure herd immunity.

    Shame was also a tool. Orenstein remembered testifying to the Florida legislature when it was considering a tougher vaccine mandate. He showed them that disease rates were lower in neighboring states that had tighter mandates. It worked.

    What’s different now? In a politically divided nation, trust in science is low and experts are distrusted—politicians more so. Childhood vaccination efforts are already beset by large numbers of hesitant parents. And efforts to fight the COVID epidemic in the United States have been clumsy and chaotic at best, leaving Americans to doubt the competence of their governments and institutions.

    There is still fear. “Maybe I’m an old-fashioned fool, but I think that most people will welcome a vaccine, if the rollout is done right,” said David Oshinsky, a professor of history at New York University and author of Polio: An American Story, a Pulitzer Prize-winning history. “Most people are desperately afraid of COVID. A minority thumb their noses, many of them for political reasons.

    How will this change when there’s a vaccine that [hopefully] changes the health risk equation to some degree?”

    Recent surveys show as few as half of Americans are determined to be vaccinated against COVID-19. Those numbers could change depending on a number of hard-to-predict factors, said Conis, of Berkeley.

    “A lot of people will be really eager to get it,” she said. “A lot will be hesitant, not only because of misinformation but because of a lack of trust in the current administration.”

    When a coronavirus vaccine is introduced, it may be sold as personal protection, even for young, healthy people. But those who suffer most from the virus are usually older or sicker. An effective vaccination campaign may try to instill a sense of solidarity, or altruism, as well as a more general sense that without vaccination, the economy can’t get back on its feet.

    “I’m not clear if people accept that solidarity,” Orenstein said. “People look more for what’s good for themselves than what’s good for society.” That said, the risk of COVID-19 to young people is “not zero. That’s one of the major ways to sell this, in a sense.”
    https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/us/th...ll/ar-BB17ZEFc

  10. #7260
    Thailand Expat harrybarracuda's Avatar
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    The American Heart Association highlighted findings on Friday indicating the coronavirus may cause more heart damage than previously believed.
    The AHA says that inflammation of the vascular system and injury to the heart occurs in 20 to 30 percent of all hospitalized coronavirus patients. The heart damage results in the 40% of all coronavirus-related deaths, the American Heart Association said.
    Studies have suggested that 8 to 12 percent of all coronavirus infections have caused heart damage. There is also concern that the resulting heart damage causes a greater risk for heart attacks, strokes, and other cardiovascular-related illnesses even following recovery.
    “Much remains to be learned about COVID-19 infection and the heart. Although we think of the lungs being the primary target, there are frequent biomarker elevations noted in infected patients that are usually associated with acute heart injury. Moreover, several devastating complications of COVID-19 are cardiac in nature and may result in lingering cardiac dysfunction beyond the course of the viral illness itself,” said Mitchell S. V. Elkind, president of the American Heart Association.
    The American Heart Association is working with 150 US hospitals and 14,000 patients to better understand the virus’ impact to the heart.

    Heart Association: Coronavirus causing heart damage to many patients

  11. #7261
    Thailand Expat harrybarracuda's Avatar
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    "Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it"
    - George Santayana



    The COVID-2019 Thread-covid-jpg

  12. #7262
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    RACGP - Vaccine search: Australian study moves to phase 2 trials

    This vaccine, developed in South Australia, without any Govt backing, should be rolled out ASAP.

    No side effects and harmless, worst way it would not work, but I am confident it would work. Job done.

    Only problem, big pharma would not get a slice.

  13. #7263
    Thailand Expat harrybarracuda's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Iceman123 View Post
    RACGP - Vaccine search: Australian study moves to phase 2 trials

    This vaccine, developed in South Australia, without any Govt backing, should be rolled out ASAP.

    No side effects and harmless, worst way it would not work, but I am confident it would work. Job done.

    Only problem, big pharma would not get a slice.
    FFS you can't say it has no side effects and it's harmless UNTIL you have completed Phase II and III trials.

  14. #7264
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    Wrong again Harry, it definitely has no side effects and is protein based. Synthetic, therefore no virus required in manufacturing vaccine. Currently being administered in Victorian nursing homes.

    World beating vaccine, by a small independent company. Difficult to fund due to politics and big pharma interests.

    There is no need for endless trials with this one. I will get the shot later this week.

  15. #7265
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    Quote Originally Posted by Iceman123 View Post
    it definitely has no side effects
    Peer reviewed?

    Appears to have a suspiciously Russian name:

    "Led by Flinders University Professor Nikolai Petrovsky"

    One hopes he is successful this time:

    Professor threatens to take flu vaccine research to the US over SA Health roadblocks


    By Casey Briggs

    Posted FriFriday 5 JulJuly 2019 at 3:27amTrials did not meet 'mandatory requirements': SA Health

    "Under questioning from SA Best member Frank Pangallo in Parliament this week, Health Minister Stephen Wade said he was in discussions with both the company and SA Health.

    "I am, in particular, concerned that some of the parameters for research that SALHN is placing on medical research are not being reflected in other LHNs," Mr Wade told Parliament.

    "Medical research is not only an opportunity to provide South Australians — and, for that matter, other people around the world — with the benefits of the expertise of our medical researchers here, but it is also a very important underpinning of quality within public health."

    Health Minister Stephen Wade said he was in discussions with the company.

    SALHN chief executive Adjunct Professor Sue O'Neill insisted there was no strategy to reduce research activity, and a number of Vaxine projects were undergoing safety and ethics approval.

    "However, two Vaxine research trials commenced without meeting mandatory requirements and subsequently were unable to proceed," she said."


    https://www.xxx.xxx.xx/news/2019-07-...rseas/11279868


    Quote Originally Posted by Iceman123 View Post
    I will get the shot later this week
    A thread in the making?
    A tray full of GOLD is not worth a moment in time.

  16. #7266
    Thailand Expat harrybarracuda's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Iceman123 View Post
    Wrong again Harry, it definitely has no side effects
    Read your own article.

    Associate Professor Paul Griffin, Director of Infectious Diseases at Mater Health Services, welcomed the news, but issued a word of caution given the data has yet to be published.

    ‘It was … a rather small phase 1 study and when talking about immune responses only an antibody response has thus far been mentioned and only systemic side effects have been mentioned as not being present,’ he said. ‘So I would also eagerly await information relating to other immunological studies, as well as local side effect rates.

  17. #7267
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    Quote Originally Posted by OhOh View Post

    Appears to have a suspiciously Russian name:

    "Led by Flinders University Professor Nikolai Petrovsky
    Nothing Russian about him, Aussie, born in Tasmania.

  18. #7268
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    Quote Originally Posted by harrybarracuda View Post
    Read your own article.
    I’ll stick with no side effects, this small company has developed many vaccines. I trust the professor on this one.

  19. #7269
    Thailand Expat harrybarracuda's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Iceman123 View Post
    I’ll stick with no side effects, this small company has developed many vaccines. I trust the professor on this one.
    You can do what you like. That includes ignoring the science.

    Just don't tell lies.

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  22. #7272
    Thailand Expat harrybarracuda's Avatar
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    The chinkies reckon one of their vaccines will be ready in December and cost around $150 for two shots.

    国药集团董事长刘敬桢:国产新冠疫苗预计12月底上市|新冠肺炎_新浪新闻

  23. #7273
    Thailand Expat jabir's Avatar
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    Let us know if the earth moved.

  24. #7274
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    Well hey, everyone knows if you don't test then there won't be so many cases. Jeez...

  25. #7275
    Thailand Expat harrybarracuda's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jabir View Post
    Let us know if the earth moved.
    Try it and let us know if your bowels moved.

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