Page 270 of 285 FirstFirst ... 170220260262263264265266267268269270271272273274275276277278280 ... LastLast
Results 6,726 to 6,750 of 7117
  1. #6726
    Thailand Expat harrybarracuda's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Last Online
    @
    Posts
    67,280
    Just in case you're wondering, it's not just HooHoo that comes out with delusional bullshit.

    The Agriculture Ministry plans to release a eucalyptus-based “antivirus necklace” that minister Syahrul Yasin Limpo claims can help prevent COVID-19 transmission.

    The “antivirus necklace” was “invented” by the ministry’s Health Research and Development Agency (Balitbangtan) and will be mass-produced next month, he said. It is one of four products developed by the ministry’s researchers intended to treat or prevent COVID-19.

    “It was [developed] by Balitbangtan. From 700 species of eucalyptus, our lab test results showed that one kind could kill the coronavirus. We are certain,” he said on Friday as reported by tribunnews.com.


    The former South Sulawesi governor boasted that the product could “kill” 42 percent of the coronavirus if worn for 15 minutes.


    “We have tried it. If we [use it] for 30 minutes, it can kill 80 percent [of the coronavirus]. We have also produced a roll-on [product]. If we ever get cut by a knife, the wounds can be healed by applying the product,” Syahrul claimed.


    He also claimed that the product gave him the confidence to visit crowded places. He said he had used it several times during work visits to inspect agriculture production.
    Ministry claims 'antivirus necklace' prevents COVID-19, experts beg to differ - National - The Jakarta Post

  2. #6727
    Thailand Expat misskit's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Last Online
    @
    Location
    Chiang Mai
    Posts
    32,007

  3. #6728
    Thailand Expat harrybarracuda's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Last Online
    @
    Posts
    67,280
    And 12 million by Wednesday the way its going.

  4. #6729
    Thailand Expat harrybarracuda's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Last Online
    @
    Posts
    67,280
    Who trusts the WHO any more?

    239 Experts With One Big Claim: The Coronavirus Is Airborne

    The W.H.O. has resisted mounting evidence that viral particles floating indoors are infectious, some scientists say. The agency maintains the research is still inconclusive.

    The coronavirus is finding new victims worldwide, in bars and restaurants, offices, markets and casinos, giving rise to frightening clusters of infection that increasingly confirm what many scientists have been saying for months: The virus lingers in the air indoors, infecting those nearby.

    If airborne transmission is a significant factor in the pandemic, especially in crowded spaces with poor ventilation, the consequences for containment will be significant. Masks may be needed indoors, even in socially-distant settings. Health care workers may need N95 masks that filter out even the smallest respiratory droplets as they care for coronavirus patients.

    Ventilation systems in schools, nursing homes, residences and businesses may need to minimize recirculating air and add powerful new filters. Ultraviolet lights may be needed to kill viral particles floating in tiny droplets indoors.

    The World Health Organization has long held that the coronavirus is spread primarily by large respiratory droplets that, once expelled by infected people in coughs and sneezes, fall quickly to the floor.

    But in an open letter to the W.H.O., 239 scientists in 32 countries have outlined the evidence showing that smaller particles can infect people, and are calling for the agency to revise its recommendations. The researchers plan to publish their letter in a scientific journal next week.

    Even in its latest update on the coronavirus, released June 29, the W.H.O. said airborne transmission of the virus is possible only
    after medical procedures that produce aerosols, or droplets smaller than 5 microns. (A micron is equal to one millionth of a meter.)

    Proper ventilation and N95 masks are of concern only in those circumstances, according to the W.H.O. Instead, its infection control guidance, before and during this pandemic, has heavily promoted the importance of handwashing as a primary prevention strategy, even though there is limited evidence for transmission of the virus from surfaces. (The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention now says surfaces are likely to play only a minor role.)
    Dr. Benedetta Allegranzi, the W.H.O.’s technical lead on infection control, said the evidence for the virus spreading by air was unconvincing.

    “Especially in the last couple of months, we have been stating several times that we consider airborne transmission as possible but certainly not supported by solid or even clear evidence,” she said. “There is a strong debate on this.”

    But interviews with nearly 20 scientists — including a dozen W.H.O. consultants and several members of the committee that crafted the guidance — and internal emails paint a picture of an organization that, despite good intentions, is out of step with science.

    Whether carried aloft by large droplets that zoom through the air after a sneeze, or by much smaller exhaled droplets that may glide the length of a room, these experts said, the coronavirus is borne through air and can infect people when inhaled.

    Most of these experts sympathized with the W.H.O.’s growing portfolio and shrinking budget, and noted the tricky political relationships it has to manage, especially with the United States and China. They praised W.H.O. staff for holding daily briefings and tirelessly answering questions about the pandemic.

    But the infection prevention and control committee in particular, experts said, is bound by a rigid and overly medicalized view of scientific evidence, is slow and risk-averse in updating its guidance and allows a few conservative voices to shout down dissent.


    “They’ll die defending their view,” said one longstanding W.H.O. consultant, who did not wish to be identified because of her continuing work for the organization. Even its staunchest supporters said the committee should
    diversify its expertise and relax its criteria for proof, especially in a fast-moving outbreak.


    “I do get frustrated about the issues of airflow and sizing of particles, absolutely,” said Mary-Louise McLaws, a committee member and epidemiologist at the University of New South Wales in Sydney.


    “If we started revisiting airflow, we would have to be prepared to change a lot of what we do,” she said. “I think it’s a
    good idea, a very good idea, but it will cause an enormous shudder through the infection control society.”


    In early April, a group of 36 experts on air quality and aerosols urged the W.H.O. to consider the growing evidence on airborne transmission of the coronavirus. The agency responded promptly, calling Lidia Morawska, the group’s leader and a longtime W.H.O. consultant, to arrange a meeting.

    But the discussion was dominated by a few experts who are staunch supporters of handwashing and felt it must be emphasized over aerosols, according to some participants, and the committee’s advice remained unchanged.

    Dr. Morawska and others pointed to
    several incidents that indicate airborne transmission of the virus, particularly in poorly ventilated and crowded indoor spaces. They said the W.H.O. was making an artificial distinction between tiny aerosols and larger droplets, even though infected people produce both.


    “We’ve known since 1946 that coughing and talking generate aerosols,” said Linsey Marr, an expert in airborne transmission of viruses at Virginia Tech.


    Scientists have not been able to grow the coronavirus from aerosols in the lab. But that doesn’t mean aerosols are not infective, Dr. Marr said: Most of the
    samples in those experiments have come from hospital rooms with good air flow that would dilute viral levels.


    In most buildings, she said, “the air-exchange rate is usually much lower, allowing virus to accumulate in the air and pose a greater risk.”


    The W.H.O. also is relying on a dated definition of airborne transmission, Dr. Marr said. The agency believes an airborne pathogen, like the measles virus, has to be highly infectious and to travel long distances.


    People generally “think and talk about airborne transmission profoundly stupidly,” said Bill Hanage, an epidemiologist at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health.

    “We have this notion that airborne transmission means droplets hanging in the air capable of infecting you many hours later, drifting down streets, through letter boxes and finding their way into homes everywhere,” Dr. Hanage said.


    Experts all agree that the coronavirus does not behave that way. Dr. Marr and others said the coronavirus seemed to be most infectious when people were in prolonged contact at close range, especially indoors, and even more so in
    superspreader events — exactly what scientists would expect from aerosol transmission.

    The W.H.O. has found itself at odds with groups of scientists more than once during this pandemic.

    The agency lagged behind most of its member nations in
    endorsing face coverings for the public. While other organizations, including the C.D.C., have long since acknowledged the importance of transmission by people without symptoms, the W.H.O. still maintains that asymptomatic transmission is rare.


    “At the country level, a lot of W.H.O. technical staff are scratching their heads,” said a consultant at a regional office in Southeast Asia, who did not wish to be identified because he was worried about losing his contract. “This is not giving us credibility.”


    The consultant recalled that the W.H.O. staff members in his country were the only ones to go without masks after the government there endorsed them.


    Many experts said the W.H.O. should embrace what some called a “precautionary principle” and others called “needs and values” — the idea that even without definitive evidence, the agency should assume the worst of the virus, apply common sense and recommend the best protection possible.

    “There is no incontrovertible proof that SARS-CoV-2 travels or is transmitted significantly by aerosols, but there is absolutely no evidence that it’s not,” said Dr. Trish Greenhalgh, a primary care doctor at the University of Oxford in Britain.


    “So at the moment we have to make a decision in the face of uncertainty, and my goodness, it’s going to be a disastrous decision if we get it wrong,” she said. “So why not just mask up for a few weeks, just in case?”


    After all, the W.H.O. seems willing to accept without much evidence the idea that the virus may be transmitted from surfaces, she and other researchers noted, even as other health agencies have stepped back emphasizing this route.


    “I agree that fomite transmission is not directly demonstrated for this virus,” Dr. Allegranzi, the W.H.O.’s technical lead on infection control, said, referring to objects that may be infectious. “But it is well known that other coronaviruses and respiratory viruses are transmitted, and demonstrated to be transmitted, by contact with fomite.”


    The agency also must consider the needs of all its member nations, including those with limited resources, and make sure its recommendations are tempered by “availability, feasibility, compliance, resource implications,” she said.


    Aerosols may play some limited role in spreading the virus, said Dr. Paul Hunter, a member of the infection prevention committee and professor of medicine at the University of East Anglia in Britain.


    But if the W.H.O. were to push for rigorous control measures in the absence of proof, hospitals in low- and middle-income countries may be forced to divert scarce resources from other crucial programs.

    “That’s the balance that an organization like the W.H.O. has to achieve,” he said. “It’s the easiest thing in the world to say, ‘We’ve got to follow the precautionary principle,’ and ignore the opportunity costs of that.”


    In interviews, other scientists criticized this view as paternalistic. “‘We’re not going to say what we really think, because we think you can’t deal with it?’ I don’t think that’s right,” said Don Milton, an aerosol expert at the University of Maryland.


    Even cloth masks, if worn by everyone, can significantly reduce transmission, and the W.H.O. should say so clearly, he added.


    Several experts criticized the W.H.O.’s messaging throughout the pandemic, saying the staff seems to prize scientific perspective over clarity.


    “What you say is designed to help people understand the nature of a public health problem,” said Dr. William Aldis, a longtime W.H.O. collaborator based in Thailand. “That’s different than just scientifically describing a disease or a virus.”


    The W.H.O. tends to describe “an absence of evidence as evidence of absence,” Dr. Aldis added. In April, for example,
    the W.H.O. said, “There is currently no evidence that people who have recovered from Covid-19 and have antibodies are protected from a second infection.”


    The statement was intended to indicate uncertainty, but the phrasing stoked unease among the public and earned rebukes from several experts and journalists. The W.H.O. later walked back its comments.

    In a less public instance, the W.H.O. said there was “no evidence to suggest” that people with H.I.V. were at increased risk from the coronavirus. After Joseph Amon, the director of global health at Drexel University in Philadelphia who has sat on many agency committees, pointed out that the phrasing was misleading, the W.H.O. changed it to say the
    level of risk was “unknown.”


    But W.H.O. staff and some members said the critics did not give its committees enough credit.


    “Those that may have been frustrated may not be cognizant of how W.H.O. expert committees work, and they work slowly and deliberately,” Dr. McLaws said.


    Dr. Soumya Swaminathan, the W.H.O.’s chief scientist, said agency staff members were trying to evaluate new scientific evidence as fast as possible, but without sacrificing the quality of their review. She added that the agency will try to broaden the committees’ expertise and communications to make sure everyone is heard.


    “We take it seriously when journalists or scientists or anyone challenges us and say we can do better than this,” she said. “We definitely want to do better.”
    https://www.nytimes.com/2020/07/04/h...h=login-google

  5. #6730
    Pedantic bastard
    nidhogg's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Last Online
    @
    Posts
    15,656
    Melbourne slaming a lock down in some spots.
    Coronavirus Australia: Melbourne locks down tower blocks as cases rise - BBC News


    But the nine tower blocks in Flemington and North Melbourne face a "hard lockdown". Basically they were told to go home ad stay home for 5 days minimum, with NO allowence for them to pick up supplies etc. Apparently police enforced.

  6. #6731
    Thailand Expat
    OhOh's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Last Online
    Today @ 03:47 AM
    Location
    Where troubles melt like lemon drops
    Posts
    20,166
    Quote Originally Posted by nidhogg View Post
    Basically they were told to go home ad stay home for 5 days minimum
    Dropping a few flaming objects down the nine tower blocks rubbish chutes, may have an effect on that rule.

  7. #6732
    Thailand Expat misskit's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Last Online
    @
    Location
    Chiang Mai
    Posts
    32,007
    Researchers found without a mask, sneezes and coughs can travel over 8 feet. With a mask, distance is dramatically reduced, with some to just a few inches.

  8. #6733
    Thailand Expat
    OhOh's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Last Online
    Today @ 03:47 AM
    Location
    Where troubles melt like lemon drops
    Posts
    20,166
    The POTUS capitulates.

    The COVID-2019 Thread-trump-xi-smile-jpg


    'We need to live with it': White House readies new message for the nation on coronavirus

    "The effort to craft a clearer response comes after months of Trump downplaying the health crisis and mixed signals from the administration.

    After several months of mixed messages on the coronavirus pandemic, the White House is settling on a new one: Learn to live with it.
    Administration officials are planning to intensify what they hope is a sharper, and less conflicting, message of the pandemic next week, according to senior administration officials, after struggling to offer clear directives amid a crippling surge in cases across the country. On Thursday, the United States reported more than 55,000 new cases of coronavirus and infection rates were hitting new records in multiple states.

    At the crux of the message, officials said, is a recognition by the White House that the virus is not going away any time soon — and will be around through the November election.


    As a result, President Donald Trump's top advisers plan to argue, the country must figure out how to press forward despite it. Therapeutic drugs will be showcased as a key component for doing that and the White House will increasingly emphasize the relatively low risk most Americans have of dying from the virus, officials said.

    For nearly six months the administration offered a series of predictions and pronouncements that never came to fruition. From Trump promising that "the problem goes away in April" and predicting "packed churches all over our country" on Easter Sunday to Vice President Mike Pence's claim that "by Memorial Day weekend we will have this coronavirus epidemic behind us" to Jared Kushner's pronouncement the country would be "really rocking again" by July because Americans were "on the other side of the medical aspect of this."

    This all followed the White House's initial message in January that the virus wasn't a threat at all. Asked if he was worried about a pandemic, Trump said at the time, "It's one person coming in from China, and we have it under control. It's going to be just fine."


    The message then morphed to the idea that the virus would be swiftly crushed by a robust federal response. "WE WILL WIN THIS WAR," Trump tweeted in March.


    Soon after, the president demanded governors open up their states and said he had the authority to force them to do so. "LIBERATE MICHIGAN!" and "LIBERATE MINNESOTA!" and "LIBERATE VIRGINIA," he wrote on Twitter in April. Within days he decided to shift responsibility for the pandemic to the governors, saying, "The federal government will be watching them very closely and will be there to help in many different ways."


    In recent weeks, the message has been that the country is back, face coverings and social distancing are optional, even as the number of coronavirus cases across the country surged.


    "We have to get back to business. We have to get back to living our lives. Can't do this any longer," Trump said in an interview with Axios last month before his campaign rally in Tulsa, where almost no one socially distanced and few wore masks. "And I do believe it's safe. I do believe it's very safe." A number of Trump’s own campaign staffers and Secret Service agents contracted COVID-19 in Tulsa.


    Eager to move forward and reopen the economy amid a recession and a looming presidential election, the White House is now pushing acceptance.


    "The virus is with us, but we need to live with it," is how one official said the administration plans to message on the pandemic.

    As often is the case with plans crafted for Trump by his aides, the question hanging over this effort is whether he will stick to the script. Trump said this week that he's "all for masks," after months of resisting pressure for him to embrace face coverings. Yet in that same interview with Fox Business on Wednesday, the president said the virus will "just disappear, I hope."


    That's not the message senior administration officials said they're preparing, and some of the president's allies have cringed when he's talked in the past about the virus disappearing, only to then see it further spread.


    Next week administration officials plan to promote a new study they say shows promising results on therapeutics, the officials said. They wouldn't describe the study in any further detail because, they said, its disclosure would be "market-moving."


    Officials also plan to emphasize high survival rates, particularly for Americans who are within certain age groups and don't have underlying conditions. The overall death rate from COVID-19 in the U.S. has been on the decline. More than 130,000 Americans have died of the virus.


    Trump is expected to be briefed by Dr. Deborah Birx, one of the most visible members of the White House Coronavirus Task Force, before Monday on her assessment of new hot spots that she's visited this week, including what governors have said they need and how the new surge is affecting minority communities, officials said. Birx was in Florida, Texas and Arizona this week.


    One of the officials indicated that coronavirus task force meetings and public briefings will be more frequent — a shift already underway this week. Those meetings and briefings were daily for much of March and April, but they tapered off when Trump pivoted to focusing on the need to reopen the economy. Nearly 20 million Americans are now jobless and the unemployment rate remains in the double digits, despite a record drop in the past month.

    Recent public briefings from the task force, so far, have taken place outside the White House complex. Members of the coronavirus task force, led by Pence, have taken questions from reporters five times in five different places, ranging from the Department of Health and Human Services to various Sun Belt coronavirus hot spots.


    One official said moving the briefing locations is an attempt to minimize questions from the White House press corps. Another said it was also designed to prevent Trump from being tempted to take over the briefings.


    Some of Trump's allies had lamented that he was hurting himself politically by spending sometimes two hours at the podium sparring with reporters and often veering off topic, rather than conveying a specific message about the pandemic.


    In recent days, however, Trump personally asked the task force to resume briefings but decided he would not participate in them, according to three White House officials.


    The change comes as multiple recent national polls show Trump trailing presumptive Democratic nominee Joe Biden.


    On Thursday, the president claimed that when Pence held a recent call with governors and asked the state executives what they might need, none of them requested federal assistance.

    "Not one governor needed anything. They don't need anything. They have all the medical equipment they can have. Thank you, U.S. government," Trump said.


    But as Pence has crisscrossed the country this week, visiting places with virus outbreaks such as Dallas, Phoenix and Tampa, he has been quick to note several requests from the governors of those states in real time. For example, Texas Gov. Greg Abbott on Sunday expressed a desire to continue federal funding for testing sites in his state that was set at the end of June.


    Pence agreed and promised to extend "that every bit as long as Texas wants us to," noting that "this is all hands on deck" during a press briefing with other members of the coronavirus task force.


    In Arizona on Wednesday, Pence noted Gov. Doug Ducey requested additional medical personnel during their meeting and the vice president subsequently "instructed the Acting Secretary of Homeland Security to move out immediately on providing the additional doctors and nurses and technical personnel."


    Throughout his travels, Pence has been accompanied by Birx, a trend that is expected to continue in the coming weeks, according to a person close to the task force.

    Dr. Anthony Fauci, for his part, has been issuing dire warnings on the future of the pandemic from other perches. He testified on Capitol Hill this week that if current trends continue, Americans could see as many as 100,000 new cases daily.

    In an interview with BBC Radio on Thursday, Fauci said: "What we've seen over the last several days is a spike in cases that are well beyond the worse spikes that we've seen. That is not good news, we've got to get that under control or we risk an even greater outbreak in the United States."

    '''We need to live with it''': White House readies new message for the nation on coronavirus
    Last edited by OhOh; 06-07-2020 at 06:13 PM.
    A tray full of GOLD is not worth a moment in time.

  9. #6734
    Thailand Expat harrybarracuda's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Last Online
    @
    Posts
    67,280
    Quote Originally Posted by OhOh View Post
    The POTUS capitulates.
    He did that a long time ago.

  10. #6735
    Thailand Expat harrybarracuda's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Last Online
    @
    Posts
    67,280
    If the Covid doesn't get you, there's always the Swine flu mentioned earlier.

    Then the chinkies are trialling Bubonic Plague....

    Bubonic Plague Is Diagnosed in China


    An Inner Mongolia city put control measures in place after one confirmed case of the disease, which caused the Black Death in the Middle Ages.

    Bubonic Plague Is Diagnosed in China - The New York Times
    And if that fails, the seppos are fighting back with brain-eating protozoans!

    The Florida Department of Health has issued a warning over a rare case of 'brain-eating' amoeba after one person has been infected.

    The incident occurred in Hillsborough County with health officials urging locals to avoid nasal contact with water from taps and other sources. This includes bodies of open water like lakes and ponds where infections are more likely in the warmer summer months. People have also been told to avoid digging or stirring up sediment in shallow freshwater and should use nose clips while swimming.

    Florida issues warning over 'brain-eating' amoeba | Pharmafile

  11. #6736
    Thailand Expat misskit's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Last Online
    @
    Location
    Chiang Mai
    Posts
    32,007
    India surges to No.3 in cases as virus chokes US hospitals: World update

    India on Monday became the third-highest coronavirus caseload in the world, as officials warned hospitals in the United States were in danger of being overwhelmed by a surge in infections.


    Despite signs of progress in parts of Europe -- where the Louvre in Paris will reopen on Monday -- total global infections are fast approaching 11.5 million, with more than 533,000 deaths.


    The Indian government -- like many around the world -- has gradually lifted virus restrictions to help the battered economy, but the number of cases has continued to climb, with 24,000 reported in 24 hours to take the total to nearly 700,000 on Monday.

    MORE India surges to No.3 in cases as virus chokes US hospitals: World update

  12. #6737
    Thailand Expat jabir's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2016
    Last Online
    @
    Posts
    10,989
    Despite signs of progress in parts of Europe -- where the Louvre in Paris will reopen on Monday -- total global infections are fast approaching 11.5 million, with more than 533,000 deaths.
    With scary virus news trickling through and 'experts' still in blind conflict, I wouldn't call reopening the Louvre progress, more like folly.

    The urgency to reopen could quickly double the death toll to date, and national lockdowns won't be a thing of the past.

  13. #6738
    Hangin' Around cyrille's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Last Online
    @
    Posts
    20,187
    White House claims US is 'a leader' in fight against Covid-19 as cases rise | US news | The Guardian

    The White House claimed on Monday that the US has been “a leader” in the global fight against coronavirus, despite infections nationally now approaching 3m, with 130,000 deaths, and America recently witnessing the highest ever number of new daily cases reported in the world.

    With the majority of US states reporting increases in new cases, the White House press secretary, Kayleigh McEnany, said at a briefing on Monday afternoon: “I think the world is looking at us as a leader in Covid-19.”

  14. #6739
    Thailand Expat harrybarracuda's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Last Online
    @
    Posts
    67,280
    Quote Originally Posted by cyrille View Post
    White House claims US is 'a leader' in fight against Covid-19 as cases rise | US news | The Guardian

    The White House claimed on Monday that the US has been “a leader” in the global fight against coronavirus, despite infections nationally now approaching 3m, with 130,000 deaths, and America recently witnessing the highest ever number of new daily cases reported in the world.

    With the majority of US states reporting increases in new cases, the White House press secretary, Kayleigh McEnany, said at a briefing on Monday afternoon: “I think the world is looking at us as a leader in Covid-19.”
    I thought she said she was never going to lie?

  15. #6740
    Thailand Expat AntRobertson's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Last Online
    @
    Posts
    37,700
    She did.

    It was her first lie.

  16. #6741
    Thailand Expat harrybarracuda's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Last Online
    @
    Posts
    67,280
    HANOI, Vietnam (AP) — A British pilot who was Vietnam’s most critical COVID-19 patient is virus free and has recovered enough to make the long flight home next Sunday, doctors said.

    A group of Vietnamese doctors who have been overseeing the treatment of the 42-year-old man from Scotland announced Monday evening that he “has made substantial progress and his health condition allows him to travel” on the 12 hour flight to London.

    The man is virus free, breathes normally without any support and is no longer treated as a COVID-19 patient, said Dr. Tran Thanh Linh, the deputy head of the ICU ward at Cho Ray hospital where the man is receiving treatment.


    Vietnam has gone all out to save the man, who was working for national carrier Vietnam Airlines when he tested positive for the virus in March. The pilot had been critically ill and spent 65 days on life support.

    Doctors said at one point they considered a lung transplant as the man’s lungs were 90% damaged and non-functional.


    Linh said Tuesday that the man now sleeps well and can sit up and walk with a walking frame.


    He will however be accompanied by a team of doctors on a flight to London scheduled for this coming Sunday, the doctor said.


    The pilot is known in Vietnam as “Patient 91” as he was the 91st person in the country confirmed to have the coronavirus. He was Vietnam’s last patient in the ICU and his recovery means Vietnam has still not had any COVID-19 deaths.


    Vietnam has reported a total of 369 coronavirus cases. It has not found a local transmitted infection in nearly three months. All recent cases are people who were infected abroad and the patients were placed in the government’s centralized quarantine facilities upon their arrival in Vietnam.


    British pilot to leave Vietnam for home after virus recovery

  17. #6742
    Thailand Expat harrybarracuda's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Last Online
    @
    Posts
    67,280
    I wish him the maximum of fear and discomfort. Hopefully that will teach him not to be an arsehole.

    Brazil’s Bolsonaro undergoes lung test after reported coronavirus symptoms
    Brazil’s Bolsonaro undergoes lung test after reported coronavirus symptoms | Fox News

  18. #6743
    Thailand Expat harrybarracuda's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Last Online
    @
    Posts
    67,280
    The COVID-2019 Thread-iluyibx80b951-jpg

  19. #6744
    Thailand Expat
    aging one's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Last Online
    Today @ 10:33 AM
    Posts
    18,459
    Melbourne to be shut down for 6 weeks starting tonight. Hard lockdown.

    Melbourne to reimpose six-week coronavirus lockdown as Australia battles potential second wave - CNN

  20. #6745
    Thailand Expat
    Latindancer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Last Online
    Today @ 09:52 AM
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    12,751
    Quote Originally Posted by harrybarracuda View Post
    I wish him the maximum of fear and discomfort. Hopefully that will teach him not to be an arsehole.


    Brazil’s Bolsonaro undergoes lung test after reported coronavirus symptoms | Fox News
    Fingers crossed.....please please

  21. #6746
    Thailand Expat harrybarracuda's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Last Online
    @
    Posts
    67,280

  22. #6747
    Thailand Expat David48atTD's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2016
    Last Online
    @
    Location
    Palace Far from Worries
    Posts
    10,875
    Too funny ...


  23. #6748
    En route
    Cujo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Last Online
    Today @ 10:14 AM
    Location
    Reality.
    Posts
    29,909
    Quote Originally Posted by aging one View Post
    Melbourne to be shut down for 6 weeks starting tonight. Hard lockdown.

    Melbourne to reimpose six-week coronavirus lockdown as Australia battles potential second wave - CNN
    And they've shut the border between Victoria and NSW for the first time since 1919.

  24. #6749
    Thailand Expat harrybarracuda's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Last Online
    @
    Posts
    67,280
    11.95 million cases. The US should be able to take that over 12m on its own today.

  25. #6750
    Thailand Expat
    Latindancer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Last Online
    Today @ 09:52 AM
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    12,751
    It's official....Bolsonaro has tested positive.

    My prayers were answered, but so far his symptoms are mild. Lets hope its like Boris Johnson though.....often it worsens after a few days.

Page 270 of 285 FirstFirst ... 170220260262263264265266267268269270271272273274275276277278280 ... LastLast

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •