1. #4601
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    Genticles is away with the Pixies, he's gone stir crazy

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    Quote Originally Posted by russellsimpson View Post
    Dr. Ai Fen, director of the Emergency Department at the Central Hospital of Wuhan
    Isn't there videos of her circulating that are saying, she is free,and her social media sites are up and she is posting?

  3. #4603
    Thailand Expat misskit's Avatar
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    Evidence that coronavirus originated at Chinese lab is 'inconclusive,' top general says

    The top U.S. general said evidence that the coronavirus originated at a Chinese research lab is "inconclusive," following a report that U.S. officials warned of safety concerns at a research facility in the city of Wuhan two years ago.


    "We've had a lot of intelligence take a hard look at that," Joint Chiefs Chairman Gen. Mark Milley told reporters Tuesday. "At this point it's inconclusive, although the weight of the evidence seems to indicate natural. But we don’t know for certain."

    MORE Evidence that coronavirus originated at Chinese lab is 'inconclusive,' top general says - POLITICO

  4. #4604
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    [QUOTE=Chittychangchang;4089208]Each day, news of more deaths is a huge source of alarm to people across the country - as well as a tragedy for the families involved.

    Projections of how bad the outbreak could get have prompted ministers to put the country into lockdown. But what are death figures really telling us? And how bad is it going to get?

    Yup CCC.

    I guess in this day and age we should expect the fudging and number manipulation that we have seen since the get go.

    It's fucking disgraceful is what it is.

    The biggest underlying problem is that 98 percent of people don't understand statistics, and this includes educated professionals including medical doctors who are, in this respect, thick as pig shit.

    Statistics should be compulsory at least for the first two years of post secondary education.

    Damn good post. Thanks for sharing.
    If you're being run out of town get in front of the crowd and make it look like a parade.
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  5. #4605
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chico View Post
    Isn't there videos of her circulating that are saying, she is free,and her social media sites are up and she is posting?
    If there is I haven't seen it.

    Can we believe anything that "officially" comes out the CPC.

    If you find the video I'd love to see it.

    Cheers.

  6. #4606
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    Quote Originally Posted by lom View Post
    U.S has for the last 30 years moved most of their polluting factories to China in order to reduce U.S pollution and to circumvent U.S pollution laws.
    They want to move that production back to U.S (MAGA) but can't do that if they have to adhere to the Paris Agreement so they used Chinese pollution as an excuse for pulling out. Oh the hypocrisy!
    The US isn't part of the Paris Agreement, right ?

    I'm missing your point.

    Sorry.

    So that the factories were moved had little to do with wages?

  7. #4607
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    [QUOTE=Seekingasylum;4089245]I think it is now clear to even the dimmest Brit, this Tory cabinet, recruited it seems on no other basis than a slavish and swivel-eyed devotion to Brexit as a cult belief system overriding all other concerns, is the most incompetent government in living memory.

    A tad mean.


    If you are the author of that post you should be publishing.

    Excellent piece of writing.

    I'd give you green but I still haven't figured out how to do that.

    Brit, ey.

  8. #4608
    Custom user Neverna's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by russellsimpson View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Chittychangchang View Post
    Each day, news of more deaths is a huge source of alarm to people across the country - as well as a tragedy for the families involved.

    Projections of how bad the outbreak could get have prompted ministers to put the country into lockdown. But what are death figures really telling us? And how bad is it going to get?
    Yup CCC.

    Damn good post. Thanks for sharing.
    It was a copy and paste from a BBC article.

    Coronavirus: How to understand the death toll - BBC News

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    One of the Canadian provinces reported that "depending on....." the death toll would be anywhere between three and thirty thousand before the end of April.

    Thick as pig shit.

    And that was the national broadcaster.

    I'm very selective in what I watch anymore.

  10. #4610
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    From the Beeb, previously reported that Merc F1 in the UK and UCL had designed a CPAP system - well it seems its workable and being rolled out with positive results.


    Mercedes has completed production of the first 10,000 breathing aids for patients with coronavirus, which are now ready for distribution throughout the NHS.

    The CPAP (Continuous Positive Airway Pressure) device was produced in partnership with engineers at University College London. It delivers a mix of air and oxygen to the lungs under pressure, via a tightly fitting face mask.

    Unlike with a mechanical ventilator, patients on CPAP do not need to be sedated, or have a tube down their windpipe so they can continue to respond to medical staff. The devices were made at the Mercedes-AMG HPP plant in Northamptonshire, which normally makes F1 engines.

    They are being evaluated at University College Hospital and several others in London and south east England. Early data on around 40 patients, who would otherwise have gone on a ventilator, found half were able to go home within 14 days of admission to hospital.

  11. #4611
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    Wow!!!!
    Smashing "comic relief" and "children in need" out of the park...
    Respect!!
    The COVID-2019 Thread-screenshot_2020-04-15-22-58-29-a

  12. #4612
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    Coronavirus infection may cause lasting damage throughout the body, doctors fear

    For a world grappling with the new coronavirus, it’s becoming increasingly clear that even when the pandemic is over, it won’t really be over.
    Now doctors are beginning to worry that for patients who have survived COVID-19, the same may be true.

    For the sickest patients, infection with the new coronavirusis proving to be a full-body assault, causing damage well beyond the lungs. And even after patients who become severely ill have recovered and cleared the virus, physicians have begun seeing evidence of the infection’s lingering effects.
    In a study posted this week, scientists in China examined the blood test results of 34 COVID-19 patients over the course of their hospitalization. In those who survived mild and severe disease alike, the researchers found that many of the biological measures had “failed to return to normal.”
    Chief among the worrisome test results were readings that suggested these apparently recovered patients continued to have impaired liver function. That was the case even after two tests for the live virus had come back negative and the patients were cleared to be discharged.


    At the same time, as cardiologists are contending with the immediate effects of COVID-19 on the heart, they’re asking how much of the damage could be long-lasting. In an early study of COVID-19 patients in China, heart failure was seen in nearly 12% of those who survived, including in some who had shown no signs of respiratory distress.
    When lungs do a poor job of delivering oxygen to the body, the heart can come under severe stress and may emerge weaker. That’s concerning enough in an illness that typically causes breathing problems. But when even those without respiratory distress sustain injury to the heart, doctors have to wonder whether they have underestimated COVID-19’s ability to wreak lasting havoc.


    “COVID-19 is not just a respiratory disorder,” said
    Dr. Harlan Krumholtz, a cardiologist at Yale University. “It can affect the heart, the liver, the kidneys, the brain, the endocrine system and the blood system.”
    There are no long-term survivors of this wholly new disease: Even its first victims in China are little more than three months removed from their ordeal. And physicians have been too busy treating the acutely ill to closely monitor the progress of the roughly 370,000 people worldwide known to have recovered from COVID-19.

    Still, doctors are worried that in its wake, some organs whose function has been knocked off kilter will not recover quickly, or completely. That could leave patients more vulnerable for months or years to come.
    “I think there will be long-term sequelae,” said Yale cardiologist Dr. Joseph Brennan, using the medical term for a disease’s downstream effects.
    “I don’t know that for real,” he cautioned. “But this disease is so overwhelming” that some of the recovered are likely to face ongoing health concerns, he said.
    Another question that could take years to answer is whether the SARS-CoV-2 virus that causes COVID-19 may lie dormant in the body for years and spring back later in different form.

    It wouldn’t be the first virus to behave that way. After a chicken pox infection, for instance, the herpes virus that causes the illness hides quietly for decades and often emerges as the painful affliction shingles. The virus that causes hepatitis B can sow the seeds of liver cancer years later. And in the months after the West African Ebola epidemic subsided in 2016, the virus responsible for that illness was found to have taken up residence in the vitreous fluid of some of its victims’ eyes, causing blindness or vision impairment in 40% of those affected.

    Given SARS-CoV-2’s affinity for lung tissue, doctors quickly suspected that some recovered COVID-19 patients would sustain lasting damage to their lungs. In infections involving the coronavirus that cause severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS), about one-third of recovered patients had lung impairment after three years, but those symptoms had largely cleared 15 years later. And researchers found that one-third of patients who suffered Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) had scarring of the lungs — fibrosis — that was probably permanent.

    In a mid-March review of a dozen COVID-19 patients discharged from a hospital in Hong Kong, two or three were described as having difficulty with activities they had done in the past.
    Dr. Owen Tsang Tak-yin, director of infectious diseases at Princess Margaret Hospital in Hong Kong, told reporters that some patients “might have around a drop of 20 to 30% in lung function” after their recovery.
    Citing the history of lasting lung damage in SARS and MERS patients, a team led by UCLA radiologist Melina Hosseiny is recommendingthat patients who have recovered from COVID-19 get follow-up lung scans “to evaluate long-term or permanent lung damage including fibrosis.”

    As doctors try to assess organ damage after COVID-19 recovery, there’s a key complication: Patients with disorders that affect the heart, liver, blood and lungs face a higher risk of becoming very sick with COVID-19 in the first place. That makes it difficult to distinguish COVID-19 after-effects from the problems that made patients vulnerable to begin with — especially so early in the game.
    Right now, “we’re all in the middle of it,” said Dr. Kim Williams, a cardiovascular disease specialist at Rush University Medical Center in Chicago. “We have much more information about what happens acutely, and we’re trying to manage that.”
    What they do know is that when COVID-19 patients show symptoms of infection, the function of many organs is knocked off course. And when one organ begins to fail, others often follow.
    Add to that chaos the force of inflammation, which flares in those with severe COVID-19. The result can do damage throughout the body, prying plaques and clots from the walls of blood vessels and causing strokes, heart attacks and venous embolisms.

    Krumholtz, who organized a meeting of cardiologists to discuss COVID-19 this week, said the infection can cause damage to the heart and the sac that encases it. Some patients develop heart failure and/or arrhythmias during the disease’s acute phase.
    Heart failure weakens the organ, though it can regain much of its strength with medications and lifestyle changes. Still, former COVID-19 patients can become lifelong cardiology patients.

    Muddying this picture is another potential after-effect: blood abnormalities that make clots of all sorts more likely to form.
    In a
    case report published this week in the New England Journal of Medicine, Chinese doctors described a patient with severe COVID-19, clots evident in several parts of his body, and immune proteins called antiphospholipid antibodies.

    A hallmark of an autoimmune disease calledantiphospholipid syndrome, these antibodies sometimes occur as a passing response to an infection. But sometimes they linger, causing dangerous blood clots in the legs, kidneys, lungs and brain. In pregnant women, antiphospholipid syndrome also can result in miscarriage and stillbirth.
    Brennan said that in a new disease like COVID-19, the signposts that usually guide physicians in assessing a patient’s long-term prognosis are just not there yet. “Coagulopathy,” for instance, “usually rights itself,” he said.
    “But this isn’t usual.”


    https://www.latimes.com/science/stor...he-heart-liver
    Last edited by Latindancer; 16-04-2020 at 05:10 AM.

  13. #4613
    Member Bettyboo's Avatar
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    Mumbai crowds...

    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails The COVID-2019 Thread-screenshot-2020-04-16-11-23-a  

  14. #4614
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    Quote Originally Posted by jabir View Post

    I wonder how much it costs to buy heads at say, the UN, or WHO.
    UN, WHO, WTO, IMF, and a whole host of other acronyms for Globalist organizations and bankers. These are all linked and operate above public political sideshows.

  15. #4615
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    Malaysian new cases were down by 50% yesterday to 85. The first time it's dropped below 100 since the MCO was implemented 30 days ago.

    Hopefully that trend continues

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    Despite Tucker trying his hardest to troll... the NJ governor explained things clearly and thoughtfully - a good interview (at least from one side):




    Interesting to see the comments underneath "Tucker is standing up for our rights", "we are surrendering our rights to this fear mongering" - absolute idiots, I know it's FOX, but utter morons. If NY/NJ had done nothing then at this stage, the death toll would have been ? double ? 5 times ? more, the healthcare system would be decimated and non-fuctional by now, the beginnings of social breakdown. I know these Americans want their guns and their rights, but why can they not understand that during a state of emergency new laws and practices come into effect due to the seriousness of the situation - of course, some civil liberties/rights are suspended during the state of emergency, normal laws and practices come about thereafter. This fools should be worrying about the Patriot Act and US Military Spending/Contractors/lobbying in Washington, etc - not emergency health conventions...
    Last edited by Bettyboo; 16-04-2020 at 11:30 AM.
    How do I post these pictures???

  17. #4617
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    Stoopid baldy orange cunto.

    A drug that's been touted by President Donald Trump as a "game changer" didn't help hospitalized patients with coronavirus and was associated with heart complications, according to a new study.

    "This provides evidence that hydroxychloroquine does not apparently treat patients with Covid 19," said Dr. Paul Offit, an infectious disease specialist at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia. "Even worse, there were side effects caused by the drug -- heart toxicities that required it be discontinued."
    French study finds hydroxychloroquine doesn't help patients with coronavirus - CNN

  18. #4618
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    Word on the street in Pattaya is that things seem to be improving and things are going to return to normalcy on the 1st of May.

    I for one will continue to wear a mask when in public places indefinitely.

    I also expect that most Thai's will continue to wear a mask even after this thing goes away.

    We are heading for a global mask wearing society IMO.

  19. #4619
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    ^
    And by global you mean Asia.

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    It seems there must be some validity in the speculation that hot, humid environments inhibit transmission of the virus.

    We know that it can survive and replicate in temperatures up to 100c but that is not necessarily a guarantee that it can infect a host. Viral loading is increasingly becoming a factor in understanding why infection is relatively haphazard but manifested in clusters where close, intimate contact was maintained over a prolonged period.

    So, if social contact is minimised and transmission is inhibited in a tropical environment then the unfolding evidence suggested by the very low infection and insignificant fatality rates we have, say, here in Thailand may well be confirmation of the theory, a trend seemingly also proven by the experience in Malaysia and elsewhere in the region.

  21. #4621
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    Quote Originally Posted by Loy Toy View Post

    Word on the street in Pattaya is that things are going to return to normalcy on the 1st of May.

    Given that such a state has not been achieved here in living memory I somehow doubt it.

    So, LT, you propose henceforth to don a mask at all times when you go about the place for fear of future infection. Will that practice extend to when you are drinking in pubs and beer bars, and dining in restaurants where in fact you might face a greater risk of contracting an infection??

    The stupidity of folk is the only constancy in this world.

  22. #4622
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    ^^ so you are staying in Thailand now as it is safer? or are you moving closer to the equator? Indonesia, Brazil can get nice and humid

  23. #4623
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    Quote Originally Posted by Seekingasylum View Post
    So, if social contact is minimised and transmission is inhibited in a tropical environment then the unfolding evidence suggested by the very low infection and insignificant fatality rates we have, say, here in Thailand may well be confirmation of the theory,
    If the Thai testing was increased we may see the true figure of active cases and deaths before they are just all forgotten and sent up the chimney.

    Thailand has a severe shortage of testing kits, I think Occam's razor should be applied to judge your spurious conclusion.

    Have you started early on the booze today?

  24. #4624
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    Quote Originally Posted by NamPikToot View Post

    They are being evaluated at University College Hospital and several others in London and south east England. Early data on around 40 patients, who would otherwise have gone on a ventilator, found half were able to go home within 14 days of admission to hospital.
    Stupid reporting from someone unhampered by any knowledge of the subject.


    Statistically, around 20% of COVID victims are going to react so badly that they will need medical assistance because of the threat of loss of lung function leading to hypoxia and concomitant vital organ failure. Many respond well to the simple provision of oxygen which patients can breathe with little intervention. Others might require CPAC intervention and will recover but a minority will need intubation. This report seems to imply Mercedes invented the process which is of course total bollocks. Anyone who needs intubation is pretty much fucked given that the cytokine cascade has inflamed the lungs to a catastrophic degree and breathing other than by mechanical means is impossible. Intubation brings its own problems not least bacterial infection and outcomes are 50/50 as to survival or not but even if you do pull through some lung function has been lost permanently.

    Different strokes, for different folks.

  25. #4625
    Thailand Expat Pragmatic's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Loy Toy View Post
    I for one will continue to wear a mask when in public places indefinitely.

    I also expect that most Thai's will continue to wear a mask even after this thing goes away.

    We are heading for a global mask wearing society IMO.
    You can't wear a mask in a bank. One example.

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