1. #2901
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    Fo you watch a lot of people's cocks, Herman?

  2. #2902
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bettyboo View Post
    Baldrick is correct... An animal virus that mutates to humans leaves a gap in our immune system - hence, why they are so dangerous; no inherent immunity and no ready vaccine/immunisation (another two reasons why it's different from the seasonal flu).
    Unless it kills you, a viral infection, including COVID-19, will provoke the body's immune system into a response that will produce unique antibodies. Once they develop a serological test that will quickly identify these then we will have a valuable aid to understanding the scale and mapping of the viral infection and also be a step closer to a vaccine.

    Now, stop your blathering and be quiet, like a good boy.

    Baldrick was talking out of his arse.

  3. #2903
    CCBW JPPR2's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by armstrong View Post
    Fo you watch a lot of people's cocks, Herman?
    ^I know. I was like WTF. What a weird post. Must be on the sauce.

  4. #2904
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bettyboo View Post
    Baldrick is correct... An animal virus that mutates to humans leaves a gap in our immune system - hence, why they are so dangerous; no inherent immunity and no ready vaccine/immunisation (another two reasons why it's different from the seasonal flu).
    With respect, all types of 'flu are RNA viruses that originated in animals and jumped to humans.

  5. #2905
    Member Bettyboo's Avatar
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    Troy, please don't be another Mr Sausage...

    What you say about the flu was due to time, and two things happened over time: 1) our bodies developed antibodies that knew and could specifically attack the flu viruses and their ilk; 2) vaccines and inoculations were developed. Neither of these two things have happened with Covid-19 yet.

    Remember history, specifically when the natives in North and South America were killed in massive numbers because Europeans came with viruses that they (and their antibodies) had never seen before...

    Baldrick was absolutely correct. It has been repeated by doctors, this isn't knowledge I have, it is facts that have been detailed by medical experts. Mr Sausage is an absolute fraud, an internet troll who has a quick look on Wiki then claims to have knowledge; there is no bigger liar on here than Mr Sausage - if you are aligned with his 'facts' then you are almost certainly incorrect (as in this situation).

    What Baldrick said is absolutely correct now. In time, when Covid-19 has 1) spread through the populations allowing immune systems to have a look at it and design appropriate anti-bodies to attack it; 2) a vaccine has been developed, so that people can both be treated when they have it aswellas being inoculated against it, then what you and Mr Sausage will be true - but it isn't now...
    How do I post these pictures???

  6. #2906
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    It may be true for some.
    Some people who are not old (or diabetic and so on) are not very affected by the Coronavirus and remain healthy because they have a kind of innate immunity. I guess their immune systems have been stimulated already by something similar.

  7. #2907
    Thailand Expat raycarey's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by HermantheGerman View Post
    I have been watching people wearing condoms and they routinely pull them down to talk then wipe their penis then put the condom back on. I witness people who take the condom off but never washed their hands after then touch their penis. This is quite common.

  8. #2908
    Member Bettyboo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Seekingasylum View Post
    Unless it kills you, a viral infection, including COVID-19, will provoke the body's immune system into a response that will produce unique antibodies.
    So, these antibodies that you say our immune systems will make - what plan will they come off? The human body has never seen this virus before hence our immune systems don't have the blueprint to make any antibodies to fight it - that's the whole point you utter imbecile...

  9. #2909
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    Don't want to become a Superspreader ?


    The British Association of Otorhinolaryngology (ENT UK) have revealed that some asymptomatic patients, those who don't have a fever or cough, could instead show a loss of smell or taste after contracting COVID-19.

    Coronavirus: Asymptomatic patients experiencing loss of smell

  10. #2910
    Member Bettyboo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Latindancer View Post
    It may be true for some.
    Some people who are not old (or diabetic and so on) are not very affected by the Coronavirus and remain healthy because they have a kind of innate immunity. I guess their immune systems have been stimulated already by something similar.
    I'm not saying you're wrong, but you're reaching because it's an unknown...

    Doctors and researchers simply don't know why some people don't seem to show the affects/symptoms of the virus.

  11. #2911
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bettyboo View Post
    So, these antibodies that you say our immune systems will make - what plan will they come off? The human body has never seen this virus before hence our immune systems don't have the blueprint to make any antibodies to fight it - that's the whole point you utter imbecile...
    Sorry, but you are talking complete and utter cock.

  12. #2912
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bettyboo View Post
    So, these antibodies that you say our immune systems will make - what plan will they come off? The human body has never seen this virus before hence our immune systems don't have the blueprint to make any antibodies to fight it - that's the whole point you utter imbecile...
    Sorry, but you definitely have a screw loose.

    That is such utter tommyrot it verges on mental disability.

  13. #2913
    Thailand Expat harrybarracuda's Avatar
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    Russia has a large number of "pneumonia" cases but they're not Coronavirus, oh no.

    And they are threatening the doctor that is exposing them.

    Where in the world of megalomaniac dictators have we heard that before?



    Doctors in Russia say the government is covering up coronavirus cases in the country and forcing medical staff to treat infectious patients without protective equipment.

    Anastasia Vasilyeva, the head of Russia's Alliance of Doctors trade union, voiced the accusation in a video published on Thursday.

    She called on Russian doctors to go public with information about the "true" state of the coronavirus outbreak in the country.

    "While the whole world is facing an outbreak of a new coronavirus, Russia is facing an outbreak of a community-acquired pneumonia," Vasilyeva said. "And as usual, we're facing the lie of the authorities."


    She said Russian authorities were referring to coronavirus cases
    as ordinary pneumonia, implying that they're distinct from the coronavirus pandemic.

    Russian authorities strongly denied her claims. A statement from the Moscow Department of Health accused her of seeking "to discredit Russian medicine and relevant government agencies" and called for authorities to investigate her.

    Russian state media said on Friday that 253 people in Russia, which has a population of about 145 million people, had tested positive for the coronavirus. Russia has announced one death.

    In an article
    published by the official TASS news agency on Wednesday, Deputy Prime Minister Tatyana Golikova said the government had kept the virus out by limiting travel and quarantining people.


    In her video, Vasilyeva said: "Colleagues, you have been mobilized for the fight with the so-called community-acquired pneumonia, and simultaneously they make you hide the real situation, keep silent about the absence of protective equipment.


    "They make you sew yourself gauze facial masks and wash them. They don't provide you with the protective suits. They put at risk you and all our country. This is silliness of the authorities. Officials want to avoid the panic."

    She said authorities were effectively forcing medical workers to spread the virus to other ill patients by refusing to equip them properly or give them accurate information.

    "We don't know ourselves whether we're dealing with a deadly infection or just pneumonia," she said. "Already now we experience lack of hospital beds for the so-called community-acquired pneumonia.


    "Our common task is to demand the protections used in the whole world," she said. "They will be intimidating you and even threaten to fire you but that threat is nothing compared to the risk to get infected yourself and to infect your family members."


    One doctor in Moscow
    told Canada's CBC News this week that they and colleagues were avoiding giving diagnoses of COVID-19, the illness caused by the virus, because of harsh conditions in Russian quarantine facilities, which the doctors could also be sent to.

    A response to Vasilyeva's video from the Moscow Department of Health said: "Since Moscow has strengthened preventive measures and improving the quality of treatment for pneumonia, three hospitals ... are used as places for finding specialized patients."

    It said that the large number of pneumonia patients was because of this reorganization and that every patient had been tested for the coronavirus and returned negative.

    It also said it "denied information about the lack of protective masks, suits and forcing doctors to treat non-coronavirus patients."


    It accused Vasilyeva of seeking to "disseminate misinformation about outbreaks of infection with a new virus and to discredit Russian medicine and relevant government agencies against this background," adding, "Since the head of the union has repeatedly provided fake information, the competent authorities should check its activity for violations of the law."

    https://www.businessinsider.com/coronavirus-russia-doctors-say-government-is-covering-up-cases-2020-3

  14. #2914
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    ^ Shit a brick.


    Quote Originally Posted by Bettyboo View Post
    So, these antibodies that you say our immune systems will make - what plan will they come off?.
    The human body has two immune systems : the innate immune system and the adaptive immune system. So presumably the former.


    Innate immune system - Wikipedia

  15. #2915
    Thailand Expat harrybarracuda's Avatar
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    Since it still seems to be in question, here's the contents of the link I put to Baldrick:


    How many COVID-19 cases have gone undetected? And are those who had mild cases of the disease—perhaps so mild they dismissed it as a cold or allergies—immune to new infections? If so, they could slow the spread of the burgeoning pandemic.

    Answering those questions is crucial to managing the pandemic and forecasting its course. But the answers won’t come from the RNA-based diagnostic tests now being given by the tens of thousands. They look for the presence of viral genes in a nose or throat swab, a sign of an active infection. But scientists also need to test a person’s blood for antibodies to the new virus, known as severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). Such tests can detect active infections, too, but more importantly, they can tell whether a person has been infected in the past because the body retains antibodies against pathogens it has already overcome.

    Labs and
    companies around the world have raced to develop antibody tests, and a few have been used in small studies and received commercial approval, including several from China. But so far, large-scale data from such tests—for example showing what fraction of people in the hard-hit city of Wuhan, China, might now be immune—is still lacking or at least not public. Scientists hope that will soon change as more tests become available.

    A new recipe could offer labs an alternative to waiting for or buying commercial tests. Florian Krammer, a virologist at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, and his colleagues posted a preprint yesterday describing a SARS-CoV-2 antibody test they have developed, and directions for replicating it. It’s one of the first such detailed protocols to be widely distributed, and the procedure is simple enough, he says, that other labs could easily scale it up “to screen a few thousand people a day,” and quickly amass more data on the accuracy and specificity of the test. Together with increased availability of commercial tests, that means some important answers about immunity to COVID-19, the disease caused by the novel coronavirus, may be available soon, he says.

    To create the test, the researchers began by designing a slightly altered version of the “spike” protein on SARS-CoV-2’s outer coat. (The alterations made the protein more stable for use in the lab.) That protein helps the virus enter cells, and it is a key target in the immune reaction against the virus, as the body churns out antibodies that recognize the protein and tag the virus for destruction. They also isolated the short piece of the spike protein called the receptor-binding domain (RBD), which the virus uses to attach to cells it tries to invade. They then used cell lines to produce large quantities of the altered spike proteins and RBDs.


    Those labmade molecules provided the basis for an ELISA test, in which antibodies in a sample of blood or plasma trigger a color change when they recognize a target protein—here an RBD or the spike protein. Initial tests of four blood samples from three confirmed COVID-19 patients and from 59 serum samples banked before the start of the outbreak showed that the test worked, as antibodies to SARS-CoV-2 bound to the test’s proteins. It showed positive results only for the COVID-19 patients and not for any of those controls.


    The control blood samples came from people between the age of 20 and 70, many of whom had previously been infected with other viruses. Among them was a different coronavirus, NL63, which causes cold symptoms. Its spike protein uses the same receptor on human cells to infect them, so scientists had worried that antibodies to that virus might cross-react and cause false-positive tests. “Across the board, the controls look very negative,” Krammer says—which is good news.


    The fact that antibodies to NL63 don’t also react to SARS-CoV-2 proteins is encouraging for another reason, he adds.

    Some viral diseases, such as dengue, can cause more serious symptoms if a person has been previously exposed to a related strain of the virus and already has partial immunity. Existing antibodies can react to the related invader and trigger a dangerous overreaction, a phenomenon known as an antibody-dependent enhancement (ADE). Some researchers have suggested ADE might explain why the virus is more deadly in the elderly and less so in children, who have had less exposure to other coronaviruses.


    Krammer says he and his colleagues are already using their test in their New York City hospital to better understand how quickly COVID-19 patients start to develop antibodies to the virus. In the future, it could also help identify recovered patients who could then donate their SARS-CoV-2 antibody-rich serum to help treat critically ill patients. Another key application, Krammer says, would be to identify people who have developed likely immunity to the virus. They might be able to treat patients safely or take on other front-line jobs during the pandemic.


    Widespread antibody testing could also provide key data for efforts to model the course of the pandemic. Current predictions vary so widely, causing
    some scientists to question the need for severe containment methods such as lockdowns and social distancing. By indicating how much of the population is already immune because of mild infections, antibody data could offer a key to how fast the virus will continue to spread.


    Such data could inform practical issues such as whether and how to reopen schools that have been closed. Relatively few cases have been diagnosed among children, but it isn’t clear whether that’s because they don’t get infected or because their infections are generally so mild that they go unnoticed. Testing children for SARS-CoV-2 antibodies should resolve that.


    Longer term antibody tests will also help researchers understand how long immunity to the virus lasts, a
    key issue for any future vaccine. For other coronaviruses, Krammer notes, immunity after an infection is strong for several months, but then begins to wane. Doctors in Germany are now testing COVID-19 patients from the small cluster of cases in Bavaria in January. One month after infection, antibody levels remained high, says Clemens Wendtner, an infectious disease specialist at the Schwabing Clinic.


    Krammer’s team is eager to test as many blood samples as possible, but as the outbreak takes hold in New York City, it is forcing work in his laboratory to slow down. He has told lab members to avoid commuting. “Everyone who isn’t within walking or biking distance is staying home.”

    https://www.sciencemag.org/news/2020/03/new-blood-tests-antibodies-could-show-true-scale-coronavirus-pandemic

  16. #2916
    Member Bettyboo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by nidhogg View Post
    Sorry, but you are talking complete and utter cock.
    Educate yourself, mate - you've been wrong so many times on this thread.

    The immune system doesn't just have all purpose antibodies that can attack anything they don't like. It's much more like a lock and key fit, specific shapes need to bond onto each other to neutralise the threat (while other antibodies and immune system defences take other approaches such as increasing the body temperature in an attempt to destabilise the threat and stop it bonding with the body's own cells.

    Here are a couple of articles that you can read up on:

    https://www.sciencedaily.com/release...3/190320110619.
    Antigenic Characterization | CDC

    It's pretty straightforward, if your immune system hasn't seen the virus before, it doesn't know what the fuk to do; over time, with exposure, the immune system becomes more effective - obviously, this is how vaccines work, so we're not talking about a difficult concept here.

    Covid-19 is different enough from anything our immune systems have seen before that they don't know what to do, they cannot make the exact antibodies to lock onto the invading virus molecules and kill them.

  17. #2917
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    Quote Originally Posted by Seekingasylum View Post
    Sorry, but you definitely have a screw loose.

    That is such utter tommyrot it verges on mental disability.
    You are wrong once again. How surprising. Covid19 is and entirely new virus, to which the human genome has yet to develop antibodies. Until now it has only ever occurred in animals and human dna has no immunity or antibodies to fight it.
    Proving yet again, that knowledge without understanding is useless, just l8ke you.

  18. #2918
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bettyboo View Post
    So, these antibodies that you say our immune systems will make - what plan will they come off?
    Erm Betts, that is not correct. Think about it, if it was correct why would countries across the globe be ramping up antibody test kits to check for those who've had it.

  19. #2919
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    ^^Christ, it's like the Rise of the Zombies, one hare-brained idiot shoots his wad of imbecility and another pops up to stumble behind him in a procession of the damned and terminally stupid.

  20. #2920
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    Quote Originally Posted by Latindancer View Post
    ^ Shit a brick.




    The human body has two immune systems : the innate immune system and the adaptive immune system. So presumably the former.


    Innate immune system - Wikipedia
    Listen very carefully stupid. This virus enanated from animals. The human body has no immunity or antibodies to this virus, normally spread between animals. It has somehow jumped the barrier from animal to animal as a virus, and infected humans. Humans have no prior immunity or antibodies to this virus, because it does not normally attack humans, apart from vulnerable spackers like you. Got it dumb fuck?

  21. #2921
    disturbance in the Turnip baldrick's Avatar
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    you are a version of trump , dear genticles

    shouting loudly does not make you correct

  22. #2922
    Member Bettyboo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by NamPikToot View Post
    Erm Betts, that is not correct. Think about it, if it was correct why would countries across the globe be ramping up antibody test kits to check for those who've had it.
    They are testing for people who have had the virus, and come through it by successfully adapting antibodies to fight the virus. This is how human evolution works, some die because their body wasn't able to make the correct antibodies, others live because their body did adapt and make the correct antibodies; the ones that live on will likely have a level of immunity in future. So, respectfully, I was not wrong.

    This line from 'Arry's article above pretty much says the same - if somebody has overcome the pathogen then the appropriate antibodies are retained. But, if the person has never had this virus (or their parents/some genetic marker) then the antibodies won't be there. The third type of person is one who had the virus, didn't fight it off so they die, they may or may not have developed some of the antibodies, but you'd better check quick because the body is going cold (like Mr Sausage's brain).

    Such tests can detect active infections, too, but more importantly, they can tell whether a person has been infected in the past because the body retains antibodies against pathogens it has already overcome.

    Obviously: 1) it's very hard and takes a long time to make a vaccine; 2) testing for people who did develop the correct antibodies allows researchers to narrow down their efforts and speed up vaccine generation.

  23. #2923
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    ^ So why are people with strong immune systems less affected?

    The article above suggests the complete opposite in that those that don't recognise the virus, such as children, are better off.

  24. #2924
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bettyboo View Post
    Educate yourself, mate - you've been wrong so many times on this thread.

    The immune system doesn't just have all purpose antibodies that can attack anything they don't like. It's much more like a lock and key fit, specific shapes need to bond onto each other to neutralise the threat (while other antibodies and immune system defences take other approaches such as increasing the body temperature in an attempt to destabilise the threat and stop it bonding with the body's own cells.

    Here are a couple of articles that you can read up on:

    https://www.sciencedaily.com/release...3/190320110619.
    Antigenic Characterization | CDC

    It's pretty straightforward, if your immune system hasn't seen the virus before, it doesn't know what the fuk to do; over time, with exposure, the immune system becomes more effective - obviously, this is how vaccines work, so we're not talking about a difficult concept here.

    Covid-19 is different enough from anything our immune systems have seen before that they don't know what to do, they cannot make the exact antibodies to lock onto the invading virus molecules and kill them.
    You are living evidence that a little knowledge is a dangerous thing.

    Now, you go take a look at a little thing called "antigen presentation". Who knows, you might learn something of real value.

  25. #2925
    Member Bettyboo's Avatar
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    ^ You still telling people that wearing a mask serves no purpose???



    Quote Originally Posted by Troy View Post
    ^ So why are people with strong immune systems less affected?

    The article above suggests the complete opposite in that those that don't recognise the virus, such as children, are better off.
    Because of two factors: 1) the immune system does quite a lot of damage to its own body while trying to fight an attack; 2) this particular virus has mutated into attacking the lungs which are a very sensitive area of attack for many people such as the old, smokers, people with previous lung damage - this is especially true as pneumonia is so widespread and a massive killer (and this virus heads straight for it in the vulnerable).
    Last edited by Bettyboo; 23-03-2020 at 04:26 PM.

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