1. #2826
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    Quote Originally Posted by Seekingasylum View Post
    My mockery and disdain for those on annuities was aimed at the ones who voted to Brexit and supported it.

    At every stage over the past four years I have repeatedly stated that Brexit posed a threat to Britain's economic strength and made it more vulnerable to systemic shocks reducing global demand and hastening recessions.

    Let me enjoy my schadenfreude, please, even if you are too dull witted to comprehend just how right have been over these years.
    Having lost the vote/argument/plot over Brexit, you are now implying that the virus will be your savior, as you laugh at death from a distance, and invent yet more statistics to support your threadbare debating style, and the narrative you wish to peddle.
    Is it Brexit or the virus that will lead us into recession, or both?

    Be so kind as to remember that a credible quote might support your next fantasy, or maybe not.

    Ray Carey obviously has me confused with Bsnub. I do drink, but only in moderation, and usually not during the day. Be a good chap Ray and go fuck yourself. Your tattered reputation on here precedes you remember. When you are capable of reasoned thought processes you may address me again. That would be never then.
    Last edited by Switch; 22-03-2020 at 03:52 PM.

  2. #2827
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    Chas, are you in the throes of some ontological process affecting your cognitive ability?

  3. #2828
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    My mockery and disdain for those on annuities was aimed at the ones who voted to Brexit and supported it.
    So now you're an investment banker? Actually, those on fixed annuities have done very well indeed on a relative basis- their payment is unaffected, and the value of their annuity has gone up sharply.
    Variable annuities, different matter- they are affected, by how much depends on the terms of the annuity. What does Brexit/ Bremain have to do with it?

  4. #2829
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    Surely you cannot be that stupid. Fixed, deferred or whatever, if the provider goes bust or the markets collapse, you are nixed.

    The economies of the West have not seen such a systemic shock as COVID since the Great Depression.

    Western societies have done nothing to prevent contagion in the past two months - what is happening in Italy is the future.

    This is no disco......

    But out of all of them the UK is the most vulnerable because of the Brexit dislocation that has devalued the currency by 20% and paralysed growth for four years.

  5. #2830
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    Brexit has totally fried your pathetic excuse for an intellect, at least what was left of it after the Leo you old sot.


    EU/EEA and the UK Sum of Cases Sum of Deaths
    Italy 47021 4032
    Spain 19980 1002
    Germany 18323 45
    France 12612 450
    United_Kingdom 3983 177
    Netherlands 2994 106
    Austria 2649 6
    Belgium 2257 37
    Situation update for the EU/EEA and the UK, as of 21 March 2020


    Of, but of course the UK is far worse off, because.... Brexit. Dribble
    Ever noticed, we are an Island nation? Have another bottle.

  6. #2831
    Thailand Expat misskit's Avatar
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    Thailand reports 188 new COVID-19 cases on Sunday

    Thailand reported a single day jump of 188 new confirmed COVID-19 cases, bringing the country’s total so far to 599, with most of the new cases concentrated in Bangkok.


    Public Health Ministry spokesman, Dr. Thaveesilp Wissanuyothin, told a news conference that the new infections comprise two groups.


    The first group of 65 cases includes 21 who are connected to boxing stadia in Bangkok, Loei, Nong Bua Lamphu, Udon Thani, Chon Buri, Phatthalung, Phra and Samut Prakan provinces. Five in the group are associated with entertainment businesses, two are related to religious affairs in Malaysia and 37 were in contact with infected people in Bangkok, Samut Prakan, Sukhothai, Songkhla, Khon Kaen and Udon Thani provinces.





    The second group of 15 cases includes six Thai and two foreign students returning from abroad and seven working in entertainment venues, selling lottery tickets and selling goods at boxing stadia.


    533 required hospital treatment, including seven severe cases, with 45 recoveries and one death.





    Dr. Thaveesilp said that officials have tested tens of thousands of people, but only 4% proved positive for the virus.


    He urged migrant workers and residents in Bangkok to refrain from moving out of Bangkok, because such movements may spread the contagion.





    The Disease Control Department has instructed the Land Transport Department to order bus operators to screen passengers before boarding and to advise those with a fever to return to their lodgings. They should carry out social distancing on buses, cleanse buses before and after a trip and get basic contact information from the passengers such as their phone numbers.


    The state-run Transport Company reported 12,889 bus trips and 178,333 passengers from Friday to Sunday. The floors of bus terminals and hand rails are being disinfected on regular basis.


    The State Railway of Thailand also reported fewer passengers than the average 70,000 per day. About 30,000 passengers on Saturday and about 50,000 passengers on Friday.

    Thailand reports 188 new COVID-19 cases on Sunday – Thai PBS World

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    Thailand Expat misskit's Avatar
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  8. #2833
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    Looking through the papers, pics of cities with deserted streets, Bristol, Leeds, Brum...all except London where that cesspool still had people out socialising and this despite warnings about infection rates being highest there. Furthermore the cashed up lovies are leaving to their second homes across the country and taking it with them. Khan, the mayor on TV this morning defending himself ...ineffectual wanker.

  9. #2834
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    Quote Originally Posted by Switch View Post
    Another poster mired in the cult of personality. Thailand is a third world dictatorship. The US is supposedly a first worl democracy, and they are still fucked
    Interested to.know how you define first, second and third world here Chas...

    Cold war definition puts both as first world...

    Civilisation definition puts Thailand first world and USA second world

    What booze are they serving for brekkies in Bali?

  10. #2835
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    Back to Coronavirus and I am much happier at the village level here in Thailand. Everyone is keeping their distance...staying on their farms mostly instead of in the village. Supplies are coming in but no-one is getting greedy and buying up the shops. Instead more vegetables are being grown and sold locally.

    One of the Bangkok nieces sent sanitiser to the village for general use. Masks are mainly the fabric variety worn everyday rather than the disposable ones.

  11. #2836
    Thailand Expat harrybarracuda's Avatar
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    Coffee time.

    At the final debate of the Democratic presidential primary on Sunday, Senator Bernie Sanders and Joe Biden clashed on the coronavirus. Sanders contended the pandemic laid bare “the incredible weakness and dysfunctionality” of the US healthcare system, and called for single-payer reform. Biden countered that Italy’s universal system had failed to protect the Mediterranean nation, and asserted that Covid-19 “has nothing to do with Bernie’s Medicare for All”. At first glance, the ex-vice-president seems right: of course single-payer can’t close the door to a novel virus, any more than it can forestall a deadly earthquake or fend off a zombie apocalypse. Nonetheless, a national health program with unified financing and governance – basically the opposite of what we have in America today – is a powerful tool in a health crisis.

    The debate over Medicare for All in the age of Covid-19 is complicated by the fact that it is our public health agencies – and not the medical care system – that serve as our first line of defense against novel epidemics. In that regard, we’ve shot ourselves in the foot with a 12-gauge shotgun: year after year of underfunding of our federal, state and local public health agencies has left us ill-prepared for the Covid-19 challenge (as evidenced by the testing fiasco). How we finance medical care, however, is also critical. On the most basic level, containing the coronavirus will require those infected to seek medical care, so that they can be diagnosed and isolated. Fear of devastating ER or hospital bills, however, could keep some home – or at work. As a Taiwan government spokeswoman, lauding her country’s single-payer system for its successful containment of Covid-19, told NBC News, “Taiwan’s health insurance lets everyone not be afraid to go to the hospital. If you suspect you have coronavirus, you won’t have to worry that you can’t afford the hospital visit to get tested.”

    On Wednesday, Trump signed into law a bill that would make Covid-19 testing – but not treatment – free. It’s hence inadequate, given the predicted looming surge in hospitalizations from Covid-19 pneumonia. After all, 30 million Americans are uninsured – a number that will surely grow as the economy tanks and millions or tens of millions of Americans lose their jobs. Even more are underinsured, and for these individuals, co-pays and deductibles will only become more unaffordable as disposable income falls and savings dwindle. For both groups, medical bills for an intensive care unit (ICU) stay for Covid-19 could be devastating. People, of course, will also not stop having heart attacks, cancer or traffic accidents during this outbreak – on the contrary, medical needs are likely to rise in the face of a recession, as unemployment and misery takes its toll on the nation’s health. Financial ruin from medical costs – whether it stems from Covid-19 pneumonia or the looming Covid-19 recession – is financial ruin all the same, and will compound the harm of the epidemic.

    But there’s more to it than that. We need single-payer not only to protect us from healthcare costs, but to transform our healthcare infrastructure. In recent weeks, you may have heard that the US, despite our high healthcare spending, has fewer hospital beds per capita than many other wealthy nations. You may have also heard in recent years about an epidemic of hospital closures in poorly served rural areas, or the 2019 closure of a major academic safety-net hospital in Philadelphia. These hospitals closed not because they are unneeded, but because they are unprofitable. For the American hospital landscape is shaped by market forces, which largely determine where hospitals grow and where they wane.

    At the same time, while our hospital bed supply is relatively low, our ICU bed supply per capita is among the highest in the world. Yet those beds aren’t necessarily where they need to be: a 2010 study in the Journal of American Medical Association, for instance, found large regional disparities in the distribution of ICU beds; the researchers concluded that in the face of a major epidemic, some areas might have empty beds, while others would have too few. Again, this distribution, far too often, is driven by market logic – not health needs.

    Finally, healthcare in America is uncoordinated – and ungoverned. Since the epidemic’s onset, hospital and city and state governments have waged “bidding wars” over crucial supplies and ventilators, the New York Times noted. It’s every hospital for itself: some are resorting to pleas to the community for donations of masks; presumably, others are well-stocked – but who knows? “Respirators, ventilators, all of the equipment – try getting it yourselves,” Trump suggested to state governors on Monday, quoted by the New York Times. This is not a healthcare system – it is atomized chaos. For again, in the American way of paying for healthcare, our hospitals (or increasingly, our multi-hospital systems) are silos, some rich and some poor, each fending for themselves, locked in market competition.

    This is neither necessary nor rational, leading both to excess and shortfalls, to generous overall health system funding yet care that remains unaffordable for many. A single-payer national health program would allow us to move past the market-driven status quo to remake this chaotic healthcare landscape of simultaneous healthcare plenty and poverty. It would, in short, allow us to begin to plan – not merely for this epidemic, but for the one that follows.

    https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2020/mar/21/medicare-for-all-coronavirus-covid-19-single-payer

  12. #2837
    Thailand Expat harrybarracuda's Avatar
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    Cuomo live now. For at least the third straight day, he's asking why baldy orange stupid corrupt cunto hasn't invoked the Defence Production Act to nationalise production of essential medical supplies. He says hospitals are actually competing with each other to buy what is available.

    Now, knowing this sordid, bent bunch of shite in charge of the WH and the Senate at the moment, I wonder how much they are getting rewarded, either personally or in campaign contributions, for awarding all this business to the private sector (because it sure as shit isn't a "partnership").

  13. #2838
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    A major airline has said it will suspend all flights over the coronavirus outbreak. Long-haul carrier Emirates says it will suspend all passenger flights from Wednesday. A statement quoted Sheikh Ahmed bin Saeed Al Maktoum, its chairman and CEO, as saying ‘the world has literally gone into quarantine.’ He continued: ‘We find ourselves in a situation where we cannot viable operate passenger services until countries re-open their borders, and travel confidence return… These are unprecedented times for the airline and travel industry, but we will get through it. I’m confident that Emirates can tackle this challenge and come out stronger.’

    https://metro.co.uk/2020/03/22/emirates-suspend-passenger-flights-wednesday-12438353/?ITO=squid

  14. #2839
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    Is Hazza the Mouth trying to turn this into another Trump thread, can one of his MOD mates put a temporary block on Mr cut & paste, just for the 12 weeks til we see how this plays out.

  15. #2840
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    Not what you want to read on the front page of the Bangkok Post website!

    Ready to break out

    Chinese tourists expect to resume their travels in April as new coronavirus infections subside, according to the Tourism Authority of Thailand.

  16. #2841
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    Well that didn't take long...

    DUBAI, United Arab Emirates — Dubai-based Emirates Airline has stepped back from its initial move Sunday to suspend all passenger flights due to the coronavirus crisis after facing pressure from governments.
    Instead, it will temporarily suspend “most” passenger flights by March 25 , with flights still operating to several destinations based on demand and border accessibility.
    “Having receiving requests from governments and customers to support the repatriation of travellers, Emirates will continue to operate passenger and cargo flights to the following countries until further notice, as long as borders remain open, and there is demand: the UK, Switzerland, Hong Kong, Thailand, Malaysia, Philippines, Japan, Singapore, Australia, South Africa, USA, and Canada,” a company statement said Sunday.

    https://www.cnbc.com/2020/03/22/emirates-airline-to-suspend-all-passenger-operations-by-march-25.html

  17. #2842
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    Germany has a death rate of just 0.3%. 22,364 reported infections with only 84 deaths.

    Germany's low coronavirus mortality rate intrigues experts | World news | The Guardian

  18. #2843
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    Quote Originally Posted by hallelujah View Post
    Germany has a death rate of just 0.3%. 22,364 reported infections with only 84 deaths.

    Germany's low coronavirus mortality rate intrigues experts | World news | The Guardian
    92 deaths now, still a fraction of the global average. And only TWO "serious or critical" cases as well.

    Although the article suggests that they may have done more effective testing and be including a lot more of the low- or- no symptom cases than other countries did.

    Either way it's positive news.

  19. #2844
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    Berlin, my place, had its first Corona death. An 80 year old man who was seriously ill before he contracted Corona.

    They are setting up a temporary Corona hospital with 1000 beds in a big exhibition hall. Intended for the less severe cases, keeping the hospitals clear for treating severe cases.
    "don't attribute to malice what can be adequately explained by incompetence"

  20. #2845
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    Most informative description I have read so far! Shared by an NHS colleague to a Coronavirus Group, set up to share advice and support for NHS staff ����
    Feeling confused as to why Coronavirus is a bigger deal than Seasonal flu? Here it is in a nutshell. I hope this helps. Feel free to share this to others who don’t understand...
    It has to do with RNA sequencing.... I.e. genetics.
    Seasonal flu is an “all human virus”. The DNA/RNA chains that make up the virus are recognized by the human immune system. This means that your body has some immunity to it before it comes around each year... you get immunity two ways...through exposure to a virus, or by getting a flu shot.
    Novel viruses, come from animals.... the WHO tracks novel viruses in animals, (sometimes for years watching for mutations). Usually these viruses only transfer from animal to animal (pigs in the case of H1N1) (birds in the case of the Spanish flu). But once, one of these animal viruses mutates, and starts to transfer from animals to humans... then it’s a problem, Why? Because we have no natural or acquired immunity.. the RNA sequencing of the genes inside the virus isn’t human, and the human immune system doesn’t recognize it so, we can’t fight it off.
    Now.... sometimes, the mutation only allows transfer from animal to human, for years it’s only transmission is from an infected animal to a human before it finally mutates so that it can now transfer human to human... once that happens..we have a new contagion phase. And depending on the fashion of this new mutation, thats what decides how contagious, or how deadly it’s gonna be..
    H1N1 was deadly....but it did not mutate in a way that was as deadly as the Spanish flu. It’s RNA was slower to mutate and it attacked its host differently, too.
    Fast forward.
    Now, here comes this Coronavirus... it existed in animals only, for nobody knows how long...but one day, at an animal market, in Wuhan China, in December 2019, it mutated and made the jump from animal to people. At first, only animals could give it to a person... But here is the scary part.... in just TWO WEEKS it mutated again and gained the ability to jump from human to human. Scientists call this quick ability, “slippery”
    This Coronavirus, not being in any form a “human” virus (whereas we would all have some natural or acquired immunity). Took off like a rocket. And this was because, Humans have no known immunity...doctors have no known medicines for it.
    And it just so happens that this particular mutated animal virus, changed itself in such a way the way that it causes great damage to human lungs..
    That’s why Coronavirus is different from seasonal flu, or H1N1 or any other type of influenza.... this one is slippery AF. And it’s a lung eater...And, it’s already mutated AGAIN, so that we now have two strains to deal with, strain s, and strain L....which makes it twice as hard to develop a vaccine.
    We really have no tools in our shed, with this. History has shown that fast and immediate closings of public places has helped in the past pandemics. Philadelphia and Baltimore were reluctant to close events in 1918 and they were the hardest hit in the US during the Spanish Flu.
    Factoid: Henry VIII stayed in his room and allowed no one near him, till the Black Plague passed...(honestly...I understand him so much better now). Just like us, he had no tools in his shed, except social isolation...
    And let me end by saying....right now it’s hitting older folks harder... but this genome is so slippery...if it mutates again (and it will). Who is to say, what it will do next.
    Be smart folks... acting like you’re unafraid is so not sexy right now.
    #flattenthecurve. Stay home folks... and share this to those that just are not catching on.

  21. #2846
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chittychangchang View Post
    And let me end by saying....right now it’s hitting older folks harder... but this genome is so slippery...if it mutates again (and it will). Who is to say, what it will do next.
    Be smart folks... acting like you’re unafraid is so not sexy right now.
    #flattenthecurve. Stay home folks... and share this to those that just are not catching on.
    This is the really fucking scary part. The Spanish flu dropped off in the summer of 1918 and then mutated to come back even stronger later in the year. I think October was the deadliest month of the entire outbreak.

  22. #2847
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    Quote Originally Posted by sabang View Post

    Of, but of course the UK is far worse off, because.... Brexit. Dribble
    Ever noticed, we are an Island nation? Have another bottle.
    Yes, a lot of non U.K. nurses have left the Island, and I don't think that they are willing to swim back across the channel

  23. #2848
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    Quote Originally Posted by Troy View Post
    Interested to.know how you define first, second and third world here Chas...

    Cold war definition puts both as first world...

    Civilisation definition puts Thailand first world and USA second world

    What booze are they serving for brekkies in Bali?
    And you have the nerve to accuse me of drinking? Your definitions are hilarious. It’s a good idea for you to stay on the farm. Your fragile mentality can do less harm there.
    If you don’t understand the massive failures in the Thai system, you are beyond help.

  24. #2849
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    ^^^ A factoid bubble burst: The Black Death came to England 100+ years before Henry VIII. It was Sweating Sickness that he was afraid of.

    Fingers crossed re yesterday figures for Italy.

  25. #2850
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    Quote Originally Posted by Seekingasylum View Post
    Chas, are you in the throes of some ontological process affecting your cognitive ability?
    Nothing to support your assertions then? Situation normal please feel free to continue with ludicrous fantasy and utter stupidity..

    Its good to know that anything you post can be safely ignored, because you can’t back it up. ��

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