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  1. #1626
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bettyboo
    at a complete overhaul of the tax structure and report to him next week.
    the question of taxing land owners has been in the work for quite some time but never implemented. This could be it. They might go after a certain type of "bourgeoise" elite.

    Hopefully they will also address the issue of the catastrophic administrative nightmare of the 30THB healthcare by offering a better alternative, or simply making it completely free.

    The best way to destroy Thaksin legacy would be to "replace" his legacy with better alternatives.

  2. #1627
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    starting to wonder if you have PDD-NOS


    Quote Originally Posted by Butterfly View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Yasojack
    Which is what happens but many of are junta loving members ignore this fact.
    it's not done in secret, it's quite opened actually, and it gives the perception that they show up to the polling station just to get paid, so really what it means is that they don't care about their duty.

    would they show up to the polling station if no cash was involved ? probably not.

  3. #1628
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    Quote Originally Posted by Butterfly
    The best way to destroy Thaksin legacy would be to "replace" his legacy with better alternatives.
    Very true. One of the issues with paying the rice pledge money is that the farmers will assume it was coming anyway, as a number of the less erudite members in this thread like to believe as well.

  4. #1629
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    the junta have already pledged 10,000 bht per tonne for the next crop, which does not really make the farmers that happy.

  5. #1630
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    Name dropping slightly, but I was acquainted with Sihasak once upon a time.

    Nice, decent chap. Capable of serving a multitude of masters it seems of course - which one has to in that profession in order to survive.

    Quote Originally Posted by Yasojack View Post
    Pasan was the man in Dubai when Thaksin went there.

    Sacking Thai ambassador in UK is a matter of appropriateness | Thai PBS English News

    Sacking Thai ambassador in UK is a matter of appropriateness
    in Politics | June 2, 2014
    The Foreign Ministry said Monday the sacking of Thai ambassador to the United Kingdom Pasan Teparak was a matter of appropriateness and had nothing to do with relations of the two countries.
    The Ministry spokesman Sek Wannamethee said the sacking of the ambassador was clarified at the meeting of the ministry’s permanent secretary Sihasak Puangketkaew and representatives of the United States, the United Kingdom, Germany and Japan at Shangri La Singapore.

    The meeting was intended to clarify the need of the National Council for Peace and Order to seize power and its roadmap to bring the country back to peace and order.

    It also aimed at convincing countries which have cut military aids to Thailand and banned entries by the Thai military leaders to their countries to review their actions.

    The spokesman said Mr Sihasak has said 39 countries and three international organisations have reacted to the military coup while Australia has voiced strongest opposition and lowered its military ties with Thailand. It also banned Thai junta leaders to enter the country.

    He said Mr Sihasak has expressed regrets over the strong reaction to the NCPO by Australia.

    He said after listening to the clarification, its representative said Australia would review its earlier stance.

    The sacking of the Thai ambassador to London was also clarified at the meeting with explanation that the sacking was a matter of appropriateness.

    A Thai diplomat Nattawat Krisnamar has been assigned to work in his place, the spokesman said.

    Myanmar has voiced concern over the military coup as it might affect the Thai economy as now 62 countries have issued travel advisories for their citizens to Thailand, he added.

  6. #1631
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    Quote Originally Posted by Yasojack
    the junta have already pledged 10,000 bht per tonne for the next crop, which does not really make the farmers that happy.
    But is probably a sensible price relative to the global price of rice.

  7. #1632
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    Agree though now the farmers are have been plunged into further debt, and we could see something happen regarding this.

    possible scenario is now the junta are back in land grabs, The BACC are surely going to kowtow now to the junta.

    Multi nationals have being trying to get into the farming land for sometime now.

  8. #1633
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    Quote Originally Posted by Yasojack View Post

    Which is what happens but many of are junta loving members ignore this fact.

    Another assumption on your part Jacky Boy.

    You make many assumptions but are short on actual facts.

    While punters are being payed for their vote the whole system is down the shitter.

    Nothing is certain and democracy comes last.

    Hence why this Coup is no big deal as there was no Democracy to start of with as Thaksin had already secured the votes from the North by paying for them.

    It was only a matter of time before the Government fell.

    When Thailand can manage to secure a voting system where its people are not bought of then and only then can it be classed as a Democratic voting system.

    Don't hold your breath Jacky Boy.

  9. #1634
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    Quote Originally Posted by Yasojack
    Agree though now the farmers are have been plunged into further debt, and we could see something happen regarding this.
    They are being paid off at an inflated price. Why are they now in further debt, unless they did not manage their funds correctly? Oh wait.... The fact the are in further debt after being paid has nothing to do with any government. It has to do with some Issan farmers spending habits.

  10. #1635
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    They were supposed to of been paid many months ago, but i won't repeat what been posted many times before.

    The money not received means they don't have money at there disposal so have to go and get more loans, to be able to survive.

    As you may or not know when they get paid for there rice they then have to pay back the banks interest, and get further loans from the BACC.



    Quote Originally Posted by aging one View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Yasojack
    Agree though now the farmers are have been plunged into further debt, and we could see something happen regarding this.
    They are being paid off at an inflated price. Why are they now in further debt, unless they did not manage their funds correctly? Oh wait.... The fact the are in further debt after being paid has nothing to do with any government. It has to do with some Issan farmers spending habits.

  11. #1636
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    Quote Originally Posted by Butterfly View Post

    what about this ? anyone selling their votes is banned for 10 years for voting fraud.

    Thailand's political system can never be reformed until they eradicate vote buying.

    The trouble is that corruption and vote buying is so entrenched into Thai culture that the chances of cleaning the country of corruption will never happen.

    Thing is I do not want Thailand to operate like things do in the West as I like the chaotic madness of the place.

    If Thailand reformed its system and operated like Western countries all the fun and attraction would go out of it.

    Cant have everything EH.

  12. #1637
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    Going to pass on your post terry as this has also been discussed many times before and its becomes monotonous.



    Quote Originally Posted by terry57 View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Yasojack View Post

    Which is what happens but many of are junta loving members ignore this fact.

    Another assumption on your part Jacky Boy.

    You make many assumptions but are short on actual facts.

    While punters are being payed for their vote the whole system is down the shitter.

    Nothing is certain and democracy comes last.

    Hence why this Coup is no big deal as there was no Democracy to start of with as Thaksin had already secured the votes from the North by paying for them.

    It was only a matter of time before the Government fell.

    When Thailand can manage to secure a voting system where its people are not bought of then and only then can it be classed as a Democratic voting system.

    Don't hold your breath Jacky Boy.

  13. #1638
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    Quote Originally Posted by Yasojack View Post


    Going to pass on your post terry as this has also been discussed many times before and its becomes monotonous.

    So at the end of the day Jacky Boy the back and forth discussion whether the Reds are all bad or the Yellow are all bad is a pile of shit and not worthy of discussion is it.

    The only thing that any person can be sure of is that Thailand's system is so corrupt its beyond actually reforming.

    The corruption flows so deep that its here forever and deep down the vast majority of Thais accept it as being part of Thai culture.

    Right down to paying off the corrupt cops for traffic violations.

    Until the cops get payed real wages they will indulge in corruption, the system is on constant loop from the lowly cops to the highest politician.

    Hence when you and others bang on regards the Reds being the only way to the future you are so far away from the mark you are fantasizing.

    You ignore the fact that the system is totally flawed and damaged beyond repair.

    Nothing wrong with that, this is why Expats love Thailand as its far from perfect.

    If I want perfect I will stay in Farang land, I choose not too.

    Rather love the madness of Thailand.

  14. #1639
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    Quote Originally Posted by The Ghost Of The Moog View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Bettyboo View Post

    The Nation newspaper said state enterprises including Thai Airways International Pcl and the State Railway of Thailand would put investment plans to Prajin on Monday and these would also be discussed with Prayuth this week.
    It's time for business and commerce to pay up for the boys with the guns.

    Either cash (kickbacks on government contracts awarded) or lucrative directorships are both acceptable coin of the realm.
    Appears that they plan to be running the show longer then some might be speculating upon....or creating immediate influence [and kickbacks] that will be a struggle to reverse - across the board.

  15. #1640
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    Quote Originally Posted by Yasojack View Post
    the junta have already pledged 10,000 bht per tonne for the next crop, which does not really make the farmers that happy.
    Stop growing rice [political tool] for the market.
    Which is becoming quite the rousing fashion amongst many traditional rice farmers.

  16. #1641
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    Quote Originally Posted by terry57 View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Butterfly View Post

    what about this ? anyone selling their votes is banned for 10 years for voting fraud.
    Thailand's political system can never be reformed until they eradicate vote buying.

    The trouble is that corruption and vote buying is so entrenched into Thai culture that the chances of cleaning the country of corruption will never happen.
    Anecdote: Some elections back - rural Isaan

    Political fixer from party 1 offers THB200 for person's vote. Person agrees & takes the THB200.
    Political fixer from party 2 offers THB300 for person's vote. Person agrees & takes the THB300.

    Person votes for whoever she felt would serve her interests. Knows that neither fixers will ever know who she voted for.

    These people are not the dumb ones, by any stretch of an uninformed westerner's imagination.
    Last edited by Waid; 02-06-2014 at 08:27 PM. Reason: Daft spelling

  17. #1642
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    ^
    Offering them an unrealistically inflated price on rice, which can only end in disaster, is another version of vote buying.

  18. #1643
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    ^ Very true.

  19. #1644
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    Pravit speaks out on detention: A ‘surreal’ week in the ‘Big Brother’ house

    By Lisa Gardner

    Pravit Rojanaphruk, a prominent journalist for The Nation newspaper, was released by the Thai military junta on Saturday after being detained for almost one week. He described his six days in detention as “surreal,” a means of “psychological warfare” designed to gather information from him and other detainees.

    Pravit turned himself in to the junta on Sunday May 25, three days after Thailand’s military took control of the country in a coup d’etat. Before reporting to the military Pravit made a statement to reporters, declaring that “they can detain me, but they can never detain my conscience.”

    Speaking just two days after his release, Pravit told Asian Correspondent Monday: “I’m fine, though it’s been a lot of stress. I’m handling it. I know many people were worried. Lots of people are still being summoned.”

    Of his outspoken press statements prior to the beginning of his incarceration, he said, “it was deliberate. I am very well aware that it would provoke the ire of the military junta, but I think someone had to make a stand – to make a statement – so I decided to use the opportunity to inform the public both in Thailand and abroad that we are really facing a severe curtailing of freedom of expression – both in censorship, and self censorship.”

    “I entered with Khun Anon (his lawyer) and two people from OHCHR [Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights], both wearing UN light blue jackets. When I entered the entrance of the old conference room of the Thai Army – which is a nice room – they were prevented from following me, and that’s when we got separated,” said Pravit.

    “They took away my mobile phone. They searched for possible weapons. I was the first to arrive on that day of the detainees. We had to wait there for about four hours. Nobody told us when we could leave.”

    At dusk, vans arrived.

    “Then we were taken away to another location, an army camp in Ratchaburi province. We knew the name of the camp after we arrived, but prior to that we were put in a van with fully-armed soldiers. There was a pick-up van in front of us with at least five or six soldiers with what I reckon to be an M16 on each of them. The two vans which we were put inside moved very quickly… It took us about an hour and a half before we got there. But we spent those hours wondering whether we would be released. I think that was really the first taste of psychological warfare.”

    Among the detainees were two former Deputy Prime Ministers, a former Cabinet minister, journalists, a well-known real estate developer and Yingluck Shinawatra’s own lawyer.

    “I was so surprised,” said Pravit. “Some [detainees] were already wearing military sports t-shirts with the insignia of the army… I was taken aback by the visual adjustment they had already made.”

    The conditions inside were comfortable and the detainees were treated with respect.

    “The cordial treatment that they gave us was beyond expectation,” he said. “But I think that was part of the psychology of the whole thing.”

    “They put us up in a two-story Thai townhouse with some amenities,” Pravit added. “I think we have to be clear that the treatment was super nice. The Commander greeted us as we set out from the van in the evening, referring to us as ‘older brothers’. He told us to feel at home and to think of it as some kind of out-of-town vacation, of sorts.”

    Despite the comfortable setting, clear rules were soon outlined.

    “We were told that we would not be able to use phones. There were two phones available – we could use them as we wished – but we would need to give out the number and someone would be standing next to us while we took calls, to eavesdrop.”

    The detainees were also free to leave the house and walk around the camp, but always in the company of soldiers.

    “The commander of the camp… and his five deputies … spent most of the time talking to us, sharing breakfast, lunch and dinner with us, and informally chit-chatting.”

    Some detainees were unnerved by these friendly exchanges, which Pravit describes as “partly psychological warfare.”

    “Most people kept wondering how long they would be kept in the camp and we really had no clue,” he said. “The truth of the matter is there was no habeas corpus. Since we were under martial law we knew they could make up a law to keep us there. None of us were charged, or heard any charges. They kept us there and psychologically it had some effect.”

    He added: “But the reality is that most of us criticized the military junta and the coup even while in detention. That includes myself. I had a lot of honest exchanges as to why the coup will not be helpful for Thailand and Thai democracy in the long run, why shutting down streets to prevent protestors from gathering would only make matters worse.”

    Of the hundreds of people detained by the military junta since the coup, Pravit felt that his group was likely among the best treated. The detainees were also told that reports were being sent to Bangkok on a daily basis on what they said and did.

    “The commander was a close subordinate of the Army Chief, Gen. Prayuth Chan-Ocha. He has a direct line to the boss, which means our group was treated well,” said Pravit.

    “I would argue that our group was treated differently. Many of those reporting [to the junta] have been dispatched to different camps in Central and Northeastern Thailand and my hunch is that the treatment we received was probably the best, judging on what we heard about those in other camps.”

    Surprisingly, Pravit would spend some time conversing with the former leader of the People’s Alliance for Democracy (aka Yellow Shirts), Sondhi Limthongkul. The men had never before met.

    “It was surreal. Everything was surreal,” he said. “It struck me that we were kind of in this ‘Big Brother’ reality show the entire time.

    “I think that it tested everyone’s mettle, being there. Some people crack. Some people cry, some people beg.”

    When asked whether the military thought this an information gathering exercise, Pravit responded: “Yes! Yes! Absolutely!”

    “I was surprised that one of the generals, who I think was assigned as my man-handler, asked out of the blue: ‘Does [foreign correspondent’s name omitted] have a Thai wife?’, ‘Is [foreign photographer’s name omitted] married to a Thai?’ It means that they have done their homework. He was not reading from the script – he remembered them, by name. He asked about [academic’s name omitted] and whether he had been contacting me, as well as his whereabouts.”

    Although Pravit’s ordeal ended more than two days ago, he is still not entirely free of the junta.

    “I could write a short book about the whole thing,” he said. “But there’s a tragic note, something very disturbing. Less than 26 hours after my being released, I received a phone call from someone who identified himself as a corporal… He asked if I could stop tweeting. That the junta needed time, free from criticism.

    “I already signed a few things, forcibly agreeing not to lead a protest, not to aid the protestors, or not to take part in political meetings. I tried to placate him, saying that if I don’t tweet people will conclude that it’s the junta and there would be a backlash that won’t be helpful (for them). I said I wouldn’t rock the boat very roughly but I would go on criticizing the junta – just as some Thai newspapers are, at least in a gentle, scolding way. He said okay, we’ll see… A few minutes later, another corporal called me – one from the camp… He said to save his number in my phone. He was asked to give all my details to Central Command and that some would be monitoring me and following me. “

    Pravit Rojanaphruk was scheduled to speak at Foreign Correspondent’s Club of Thailand in Bangkok tomorrow. The event has since been cancelled.

    http://asiancorrespondent.com/123388...nta-detention/

  20. #1645
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    Quote Originally Posted by Yasojack View Post
    Agree though now the farmers are have been plunged into further debt, and we could see something happen regarding this.

    possible scenario is now the junta are back in land grabs, The BACC are surely going to kowtow now to the junta.

    Multi nationals have being trying to get into the farming land for sometime now.
    Over the years, Thai farmers have basically written their own ticket to their failures: becoming [sometimes forcibly] dependent on the govt, aggie mafias, unnecessary loans/credit - instead of standing firm collectively, forced to play the game.

  21. #1646
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    Quote Originally Posted by buriramboy View Post
    Pravit speaks out on detention: A ‘surreal’ week in the ‘Big Brother’ house

    By Lisa Gardner

    Pravit Rojanaphruk, a prominent journalist for The Nation newspaper, was released by the Thai military junta on Saturday after being detained for almost one week. He described his six days in detention as “surreal,” a means of “psychological warfare” designed to gather information from him and other detainees.

    Pravit turned himself in to the junta on Sunday May 25, three days after Thailand’s military took control of the country in a coup d’etat. Before reporting to the military Pravit made a statement to reporters, declaring that “they can detain me, but they can never detain my conscience.”

    Speaking just two days after his release, Pravit told Asian Correspondent Monday: “I’m fine, though it’s been a lot of stress. I’m handling it. I know many people were worried. Lots of people are still being summoned.”

    Of his outspoken press statements prior to the beginning of his incarceration, he said, “it was deliberate. I am very well aware that it would provoke the ire of the military junta, but I think someone had to make a stand – to make a statement – so I decided to use the opportunity to inform the public both in Thailand and abroad that we are really facing a severe curtailing of freedom of expression – both in censorship, and self censorship.”

    “I entered with Khun Anon (his lawyer) and two people from OHCHR [Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights], both wearing UN light blue jackets. When I entered the entrance of the old conference room of the Thai Army – which is a nice room – they were prevented from following me, and that’s when we got separated,” said Pravit.

    “They took away my mobile phone. They searched for possible weapons. I was the first to arrive on that day of the detainees. We had to wait there for about four hours. Nobody told us when we could leave.”

    At dusk, vans arrived.

    “Then we were taken away to another location, an army camp in Ratchaburi province. We knew the name of the camp after we arrived, but prior to that we were put in a van with fully-armed soldiers. There was a pick-up van in front of us with at least five or six soldiers with what I reckon to be an M16 on each of them. The two vans which we were put inside moved very quickly… It took us about an hour and a half before we got there. But we spent those hours wondering whether we would be released. I think that was really the first taste of psychological warfare.”

    Among the detainees were two former Deputy Prime Ministers, a former Cabinet minister, journalists, a well-known real estate developer and Yingluck Shinawatra’s own lawyer.

    “I was so surprised,” said Pravit. “Some [detainees] were already wearing military sports t-shirts with the insignia of the army… I was taken aback by the visual adjustment they had already made.”

    The conditions inside were comfortable and the detainees were treated with respect.

    “The cordial treatment that they gave us was beyond expectation,” he said. “But I think that was part of the psychology of the whole thing.”

    “They put us up in a two-story Thai townhouse with some amenities,” Pravit added. “I think we have to be clear that the treatment was super nice. The Commander greeted us as we set out from the van in the evening, referring to us as ‘older brothers’. He told us to feel at home and to think of it as some kind of out-of-town vacation, of sorts.”

    Despite the comfortable setting, clear rules were soon outlined.

    “We were told that we would not be able to use phones. There were two phones available – we could use them as we wished – but we would need to give out the number and someone would be standing next to us while we took calls, to eavesdrop.”

    The detainees were also free to leave the house and walk around the camp, but always in the company of soldiers.

    “The commander of the camp… and his five deputies … spent most of the time talking to us, sharing breakfast, lunch and dinner with us, and informally chit-chatting.”

    Some detainees were unnerved by these friendly exchanges, which Pravit describes as “partly psychological warfare.”

    “Most people kept wondering how long they would be kept in the camp and we really had no clue,” he said. “The truth of the matter is there was no habeas corpus. Since we were under martial law we knew they could make up a law to keep us there. None of us were charged, or heard any charges. They kept us there and psychologically it had some effect.”

    He added: “But the reality is that most of us criticized the military junta and the coup even while in detention. That includes myself. I had a lot of honest exchanges as to why the coup will not be helpful for Thailand and Thai democracy in the long run, why shutting down streets to prevent protestors from gathering would only make matters worse.”

    Of the hundreds of people detained by the military junta since the coup, Pravit felt that his group was likely among the best treated. The detainees were also told that reports were being sent to Bangkok on a daily basis on what they said and did.

    “The commander was a close subordinate of the Army Chief, Gen. Prayuth Chan-Ocha. He has a direct line to the boss, which means our group was treated well,” said Pravit.

    “I would argue that our group was treated differently. Many of those reporting [to the junta] have been dispatched to different camps in Central and Northeastern Thailand and my hunch is that the treatment we received was probably the best, judging on what we heard about those in other camps.”

    Surprisingly, Pravit would spend some time conversing with the former leader of the People’s Alliance for Democracy (aka Yellow Shirts), Sondhi Limthongkul. The men had never before met.

    “It was surreal. Everything was surreal,” he said. “It struck me that we were kind of in this ‘Big Brother’ reality show the entire time.

    “I think that it tested everyone’s mettle, being there. Some people crack. Some people cry, some people beg.”

    When asked whether the military thought this an information gathering exercise, Pravit responded: “Yes! Yes! Absolutely!”

    “I was surprised that one of the generals, who I think was assigned as my man-handler, asked out of the blue: ‘Does [foreign correspondent’s name omitted] have a Thai wife?’, ‘Is [foreign photographer’s name omitted] married to a Thai?’ It means that they have done their homework. He was not reading from the script – he remembered them, by name. He asked about [academic’s name omitted] and whether he had been contacting me, as well as his whereabouts.”

    Although Pravit’s ordeal ended more than two days ago, he is still not entirely free of the junta.

    “I could write a short book about the whole thing,” he said. “But there’s a tragic note, something very disturbing. Less than 26 hours after my being released, I received a phone call from someone who identified himself as a corporal… He asked if I could stop tweeting. That the junta needed time, free from criticism.

    “I already signed a few things, forcibly agreeing not to lead a protest, not to aid the protestors, or not to take part in political meetings. I tried to placate him, saying that if I don’t tweet people will conclude that it’s the junta and there would be a backlash that won’t be helpful (for them). I said I wouldn’t rock the boat very roughly but I would go on criticizing the junta – just as some Thai newspapers are, at least in a gentle, scolding way. He said okay, we’ll see… A few minutes later, another corporal called me – one from the camp… He said to save his number in my phone. He was asked to give all my details to Central Command and that some would be monitoring me and following me. “

    Pravit Rojanaphruk was scheduled to speak at Foreign Correspondent’s Club of Thailand in Bangkok tomorrow. The event has since been cancelled.

    http://asiancorrespondent.com/123388...nta-detention/
    Nice post, BB!
    Rather revealing....

  22. #1647
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    Quote Originally Posted by buriramboy
    ‘Does [foreign correspondent’s name omitted] have a Thai wife?’, ‘Is [foreign photographer’s name omitted] married to a Thai?’
    Jonathan Head and Nick Nostitz would be my guess.

  23. #1648
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    Quote Originally Posted by pickel View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by buriramboy
    ‘Does [foreign correspondent’s name omitted] have a Thai wife?’, ‘Is [foreign photographer’s name omitted] married to a Thai?’
    Jonathan Head and Nick Nostitz would be my guess.
    Known enemies of the Thai state........military or civilian rulers.

  24. #1649
    I am in Jail

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    RS so which one is it dependent on govt or forcibly dependent,so just how do they stand collectively?

    And with many people around the world they live beyond there means but because there country people there stupid now are they.?

    will you answer this one or will you give it a wide birth.

    Quote Originally Posted by Rural Surin View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Yasojack View Post
    Agree though now the farmers are have been plunged into further debt, and we could see something happen regarding this.

    possible scenario is now the junta are back in land grabs, The BACC are surely going to kowtow now to the junta.

    Multi nationals have being trying to get into the farming land for sometime now.
    Over the years, Thai farmers have basically written their own ticket to their failures: becoming [sometimes forcibly] dependent on the govt, aggie mafias, unnecessary loans/credit - instead of standing firm collectively, forced to play the game.

  25. #1650
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    Quote Originally Posted by Yasojack View Post
    RS so which one is it dependent on govt or forcibly dependent,so just how do they stand collectively?

    And with many people around the world they live beyond there means but because there country people there stupid now are they.?

    will you answer this one or will you give it a wide birth.

    Quote Originally Posted by Rural Surin View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Yasojack View Post
    Agree though now the farmers are have been plunged into further debt, and we could see something happen regarding this.

    possible scenario is now the junta are back in land grabs, The BACC are surely going to kowtow now to the junta.

    Multi nationals have being trying to get into the farming land for sometime now.
    Over the years, Thai farmers have basically written their own ticket to their failures: becoming [sometimes forcibly] dependent on the govt, aggie mafias, unnecessary loans/credit - instead of standing firm collectively, forced to play the game.
    What I'm attempting to point out, Jacky....is the plight of suppression upon the dominate Thai agricultural sector - control and lessened freedoms from an elected civilian, less a military junta. They're all in the same mix - govt, mafias, middle-men, aggie corps, farming "banks", etc.

    They all exist to keep the greater farming community from being independent.
    Disallowing the hard-working farmer-folk from doing business as they fit.

    I'd be curious to ask, Jacky - do you have a clue at all about Farming/Aggie affairs here?
    Or it's history....

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