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  1. #6126
    Guest Member S Landreth's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hugh Cow View Post
    One of the largest threads on TD is on climate change with endless graphs and the usual haranguing of climate deniers.
    Quote Originally Posted by S Landreth View Post
    This awareness program/thread is working. Ranks #4 in most viewed in Speakers Corner
    Recently broke 400,000 views


    Thanks everyone

  2. #6127
    Im bored AF Backspin's Avatar
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    You don't have to prove that increased co2 causes the temperature to rise. You have to prove that mother nature has no way to counter balance it. The basic reality is , the more co2 there is , the more plant life there will be to absorb it. There is more forests in Europe now than there was 100 years ago. And 100 years ago they were predicting that Europe would lose all of its forests.

  3. #6128
    Im bored AF Backspin's Avatar
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    The one thing that would put a dent in co2 emissions is nuclear power. But we can't do that either according to the same climate changers.

    Or can we ? If nuclear is too dangerous than why aren't we shutting down all the nuclear plants ? Why is there 42 new nuclear power plants being built right now ?


  4. #6129
    Im bored AF Backspin's Avatar
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    Nuclear produces 4 X less co2 than solar

  5. #6130
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    Quote Originally Posted by Backspin View Post
    Nuclear produces 4 X less co2 than solar
    And how much solar waste is Japan about to dump in the ocean?

  6. #6131
    Im bored AF Backspin's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by pickel View Post
    And how much solar waste is Japan about to dump in the ocean?

    That's another hype story. Japan is a reputable member of the world community. It is not creating an environmental disaster by dumping this water. But it makes for good headlines.

    Wind power has its niche applications. But trying to replace base load with it is a disaster. Look at these dumps


  7. #6132
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    Quote Originally Posted by Backspin View Post
    Japan is a reputable member of the world community.
    Quite ironic as to why.

  8. #6133
    Thailand Expat AntRobertson's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Backspin View Post
    You don't have to prove that increased co2 causes the temperature to rise. You have to prove that mother nature has no way to counter balance it. The basic reality is , the more co2 there is , the more plant life there will be to absorb it. There is more forests in Europe now than there was 100 years ago. And 100 years ago they were predicting that Europe would lose all of its forests.
    You immediately make any discussion that you enter dumber by a massive magnitude.

  9. #6134
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    Quote Originally Posted by OhOh View Post
    ^

    A bit patchy north of Canada, the darker areas may be islands?

    Luckily no baby penguins have been harmed.

    Attachment 67571
    Particularly as they are on a different continent, emperors that is.

  10. #6135
    Thailand Expat harrybarracuda's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by pickel View Post
    And how much solar waste is Japan about to dump in the ocean?
    What is "solar waste"?

  11. #6136
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    Whatever you call the radio active "waste" Japan and ameristan have declared it "safe".

    "US Secretary of State Antony Blinken even tweeted “We thank Japan for its transparent efforts in its decision to dispose of the treated water from the Fukushima Daiichi site.”

    However, according to a previous study by Germany's Geomar Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research, in 57 days, the Fukushima contaminated nuclear waste water will pollute half of the Pacific Ocean, and in three years, Canada and the US will be affected by the nuclear radiation pollution."

    Update: US indulgence on Fukushima water disposal a 'political deal' in exchange for Japan's strategic adherence: experts - Global Times

    As one commentator proposed"

    "if it is so safe Japan, could dump it into theirs and the usa's water supply systems".
    A tray full of GOLD is not worth a moment in time.

  12. #6137
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    Quote Originally Posted by harrybarracuda View Post
    What is "solar waste"?
    Whoosh, right over your head.

  13. #6138
    Guest Member S Landreth's Avatar
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    The new U.S. Climate Normals are here.

    What do they tell us about climate change?

    Every 10 years, NOAA releases an analysis of U.S. weather of the past three decades that calculates average values for temperature, rainfall and other conditions.

    That time has come again.

    Known as the U.S. Climate Normals, these 30-year averages — now spanning 1991-2020 — represent the new “normals” of our changing climate. They are calculated using climate observations collected at local weather stations across the country and are corrected for bad or missing values and any changes to the weather station over time before becoming part of the climate record.

    Simply stated: The Normals are the basis for judging how daily, monthly and annual climate conditions compare to what’s normal for a specific location in today’s climate.

    For the past decade, the Normals have been based on weather observations from 1981 to 2010. In early May, climate experts at NOAA’s National Centers for Environmental Information (NCEI) issued an updated collection based on the weather occuring from 1991 to 2020. The data set reflects a “new normal” that takes the most recent 30 years of climate change-influenced weather and climate conditions into account.

    A warmer normal

    The U.S. Climate Normals collection has 10 versions: 1901-1930, 1911-1940 and so on through 1991-2020. In the image below, we’ve compared the U.S. annual average temperature during each Normals period to the 20th-century average (1901-2000). The influence of long-term global warming is obvious: The earliest map in the series has the most widespread and darkest blues, and the most recent map has the most widespread and darkest reds.



    Extra………

    EPA to give California back power to regulate vehicle emissions

    The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) on Monday signaled its intention to rescind Trump-era policies blocking California from setting its own vehicle carbon emissions rules.

    Why it matters: The move would restore California's ability to be an environmental regulator after former President Trump stripped the state of that right.

    For the record: The reversal of the rule is part of President Biden's pledge to tackle the climate crisis and will be finalized with public input in the next few months.

    EPA proposes major rule to reduce certain greenhouse gases

    The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is taking a major step Monday to battle climate change with the formal proposal of a rule phasing down the use of planet-warming gases called hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs), which are used as refrigerants, the agency announced Monday.

    The reduction will decrease HFC production and use in the U.S. by 85 percent over the next 15 years. The rule is being issued under a law passed last year by Congress.

    The EPA said that phasing down the use of the gases globally would avoid up to 0.5 degrees Celsius of global warming by 2100.

    The agency said it will create an allocation and trading program under which it will issue an allowance for how much of the gases can be used for 2022 by Oct. 1.

    It will also determine how much of the gases can be used for 2023 by that date next year.

    The agency said that it will create a framework within the legal timeline for the phaseout, and will revisit allocating HFCs for 2024 and beyond.
    Keep your friends close and your enemies closer.

  14. #6139
    Guest Member S Landreth's Avatar
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    • NOAA – April 2021 was the 9th warmest April recorded




    • NOAA – 2021 year to date (Jan – April) was the 8th warmest recorded



    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration


    • NASA - April 2021 was the 9th warmest April recorded



    NASA


    • NASA reboots its role in fighting climate change


    NASA is best known for exploring other worlds, whether that’s sending astronauts to the Moon or flying helicopters on Mars. But under US President Joe Biden, the space agency intends to boost its reputation as a major player in studying Earth — especially with an eye towards fighting climate change.

    “Biden made clear that climate is a priority,” says Waleed Abdalati, director of the Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences in Boulder, Colorado. “There’s a clear role for NASA to play in that,” he says, given all the Earth-science research it funds and the Earth-observing satellites it launches.

    In recent months, NASA has signalled its intention to reinvigorate its role in informing US climate policy, by appointing its first climate adviser and ramping up work on key missions to study how Earth’s climate is changing.

    The work is particularly crucial as climate change accelerates, agency officials say. “The demand for actionable information is going to increase pretty dramatically over the next decade or two,” says Karen St. Germain, head of NASA’s Earth-science division in Washington DC.

    Monitoring change

    Among the many US federal agencies that Biden has conscripted to curb climate change, NASA stands out because it is a leader in basic planetary discoveries. Its history of Earth observation stretches back to 1960, when it launched the TIROS-1 satellite to test the feasibility of monitoring weather from space. Over more than six decades, NASA has designed, built and launched spacecraft to observe Earth as it changes. Often working in concert with the US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), which has primary responsibility for national weather forecasting, NASA runs satellites that measure ice sheets melting and carbon dioxide flowing through the atmosphere. The agency also flies aeroplanes to gather data about planetary change and funds a broad array of fundamental climate research, such as climate-modelling studies. “Our central role is in understanding how the Earth system is changing,” says St. Germain.

    Biden’s predecessor, Donald Trump, whose policies favoured industry and downplayed climate change, repeatedly tried to cancel major NASA Earth-science missions, only to see them rescued by Congress. It was part of a broader pattern across the Trump administration of undercutting climate-change research and policy. NASA escaped the worst of those attacks by keeping most of its climate-change and Earth-science research below the radar of Trump officials. But it was a politically fraught time for the agency.

    Now, NASA is literally reclaiming its seat at the table. Biden initially left the agency off the high-level climate task force he established a week after taking office in January. Following some pointed phone calls, NASA muscled its way into that group, and is now represented alongside administration heavyweights such as the secretaries of the treasury and defence as they discuss the nation’s climate strategy.: NASA reboots its role in fighting climate change

    Some good news……….


    • Biden administration approves major offshore wind project


    The Biden administration on Tuesday announced that it has approved construction of what it described as the first large-scale offshore wind project in the country.

    The Vineyard Wind project, which will consist of up to 84 wind turbines, is expected to be able to produce enough energy to power more than 400,000 homes, the administration said.

    The project will be located 12 nautical miles from both Martha’s Vineyard, Mass., and Nantucket, Mass., and is expected to be completed in 2023.

    “A clean energy future is within our grasp in the United States. The approval of this project is an important step toward advancing the Administration’s goals to create good paying union jobs while combating climate change and powering our nation,” Interior Secretary Deb Haaland said in a statement.

    The Vineyard Wind project had faced setbacks during the Trump administration. In December, it said it wanted to halt its goal of getting a federal permit and was later told by the Trump administration that it would need to start all over again.

    However, the Biden administration advanced it in March and has said that the 800-megawatt project will help it reach its goal of generating 30,000 megawatts by 2030.: Biden administration approves major offshore wind project

  15. #6140
    Guest Member S Landreth's Avatar
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    • Arctic warming three times faster than planet as a whole


    A new report reveals that the Arctic is warming at a faster pace than the rest of the Earth and could experience its first summer without any sea ice by 2050 under most scenarios where the world is unable to limit climate change.

    The study, released by the Arctic Monitoring and Assessment Programme (AMAP), found that the "vast majority" of climate models predict that the Arctic would begin experiencing summers in which all sea ice in the region melts away by 2050. The Arctic region has also warmed by more than 3 degrees Celsius since 1979, according to the report, compared to about 1 degree Celsius for the world as a whole.

    The likelihood of such an event occurring, which has not happened in recorded human history, becomes 10-times greater once the Earth warms past 1.5 degrees Celsius, which it is expected to do even if the goal of the Paris climate accord is met in full.

    "Because the buildup of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere, and some emissions of short-lived climate forcers, are driving Arctic climate change, the Arctic States, Permanent Participants, and observers to the Arctic Council should individually and collectively lead sustained, ambitious, and global efforts to reduce these emissions and fully implement the Paris Agreement," advise the report's authors.

    "Changes in the Arctic have global implications. The rapid mass loss of the Greenland ice sheet and other Arctic land ice contributes more to global sea level rise than does the melting of ice in Antarctica," the report continued.

    Sea level rise poses a major threat to coastal communities around the world. It is currently estimated that at least 300 million people live on land that will flood at least once a year by 2050 due to sea level rise.

    The Biden administration moved to rejoin the Paris climate accord shortly after the president took office in January; the accord's goals are to limit carbon emissions and prevent the earth from warming by well below 2 degrees Celsius, and preferably by 1.5 degrees Celsius.: Arctic warming three times faster than planet as a whole: research | TheHill - Arctic Climate Change Update 2021: Key Trends and Impacts. Summary for Policy-makers | AMAP


    • "When temperatures do odd things...": How this map reveals a warning for the climate


    No matter how you display it, for decades climate data has conveyed the clear and consistent trend of a rapidly warming Earth. But how a climate scientist chooses to visualize that data can really help to communicate vital clues about the climate system.

    Recently, Ed Hawkins, the professor who created the now famous Warming Stripes visualization (read more about that here), from the University of Reading in the U.K. and the National Centre for Atmospheric Research, tweeted out a clever and eye-opening map, with shades of red and blue representing the amount of warming relative to other parts of the Earth.



    Map shows the relative warming of surface temperatures as compared to other parts of the planet. Areas in dark red are warming much faster than average, such as the Arctic. Areas in light blue are also warming, but more slowly than average. The region of dark blue near southern Greenland is not warming at all and has even cooled some.

    Below the dark red of the rapidly warming Arctic region, there's a big blue bullseye to the south of Greenland, in the North Atlantic, which is often called the "cold blob" or "warming hole." That dark blue bullseye, indicating cooling temperatures, might seem like an encouraging development on a warming planet, but it's actually quite the opposite — a warning sign that a vital linchpin in the climate system is malfunctioning.

    "When I first saw this new image, it clicked in my head — wow! I knew it was a keeper that needed to be shown far and wide," said Dr. Jennifer Francis, senior scientist at the Woodwell Climate Research Center in Massachusetts. "So clear, so simple, so disturbing. It puts into a much clearer perspective how unevenly the Earth's temperatures are changing."

    Both Francis and Hawkins say the stark contrast between red and blue in the same general area at high latitudes in the Northern Hemisphere tells a story of a climate system out of balance. And they say it's all connected: The rapid warming is driving what might seem like an out-of-place cooling spot. But the cooling, they say, is not out of place at all — it is exactly what climate models expected.: "When temperatures do odd things...": How this map reveals a warning for the climate - CBS News


    • Biden White House Reinstalls Top Climate Scientist Removed By Trump


    The Biden administration reinstalled the scientist responsible for producing the federal government’s top climate change reports after he was removed from his post by former President Donald Trump last year.

    The White House said Wednesday Michael Kuperberg, a climate scientist who ran the production of the documents for six years before his ouster, would return as the executive director of the U.S. Global Change Research Program (USGCRP). The agency is responsible for the National Climate Assessment ― a compilation of work from hundreds of scientists across more than a dozen agencies that helps guide the country’s climate policy ― every four years.

    “As a scientist, it’s been my honor to serve the American people under Democratic and Republican administrations to help deliver science to inform solutions,” Kuperberg, who had been reassigned to the Department of Energy in the interim, said in a statement Wednesday. “And as a public servant, it’s been my privilege to work with the Nation’s best scientists and policymakers, both inside and outside of government.”

    Trump removed Kuperberg in November despite his being midway through work on the Fifth National Climate Assessment, which is due out in 2022. Kuperberg was reportedly “shocked” by his ouster, as he had expected to stay in his position through the publication of the document.

    He was replaced by David Legates, a scientist who worked closely with climate denial groups and had falsely claimed that increased levels of carbon dioxide (a potent greenhouse gas) in the atmosphere were actually good for the planet. The Washington Post noted that Legates used his brief time in the role to craft documents that undercut the science behind climate change, even though the papers were not peer-reviewed.: Biden White House Reinstalls Top Climate Scientist Removed By Trump | HuffPost

    just for fun

    • President Biden: "This sucker's quick!"




    President Biden's F-150 Lightning moment in Dearborn: How it really happened

    The day was unscripted.

    To some, it felt like vintage Joe Biden.

    A bit unpredictable.

    President Biden, 78, whose father sold Fords back in the day, wrapped up his remarks on Tuesday at the new plant in the Rouge complex designed to build the all-electric F-150 Lightning and it all seemed routine to those present.

    Until it wasn't.

    "At the end of his speech, he kinda turned to everyone, he goes, 'You know I'm a car guy. And I want to drive this truck.' Everyone politely laughed. Because presidents don't drive vehicles,'" Ford CEO Jim Farley told the Free Press.

    Biden had taken a private tour of the factory and a sneak peek of the vehicle a short while earlier, a day before the rest of the world would see the next generation of a multi-billion-dollar franchise. Bill Ford, executive chairman, teased Biden that the F-Series would give his 1967 Corvette a run for its money.

    "I wonder whether I can lose the Secret Service and go out on the track. You think I'm kidding? I'm not," Biden joked to the Ford executives, UAW workers and press corps in Dearborn.

    And then it happened.

    "Lo and behold, I get a tap on my shoulder (apparently from White House staff) at the very end of the event," Farley said. "They said, 'Mr. Farley, we'd like you to come with us to the motorcade because we want to go to the test track and drive the truck."

    So Farley and chief engineer Linda Zhang went together to a Ford test track nearby.

    "All the media was there. And the whole presidential motorcade," Farley said. "We’ve never had the presidential motorcade at our test track before. I think all our team members were kind of stunned to see the president of the United States come to the test track. We didn’t really have any warning."

    "It was a game time decision," said Mark Truby, global head of Ford communications.

    The Ford team behind the scenes was alerted late the night before by White House staff that a drive was possible but nothing official had changed.

    In other words, they did not know he was going to drive.

    When Biden got into the truck, Farley told him, "Just mash the throttle. The thing is super fast. Mr. President, give it full throttle. It's really fun to drive."

    Biden replied, "I've got it, Jim."

    Farley just watched him go.

    "He went on the test track and, I mean, he was going really fast," Farley said. "The whole press corps was there, probably 50 journalists. He pulled up in front of all the journalists. He looked like Top Gun. He had his Ray-Bans on, in this F-150 Lightning."

    He was driving on a large skid pad, a huge open space where he could go up and back — at high rates of speed — and do sporty turns. Biden turned to the press and asked if anyone had timed him, that he might have hit 0-60 mph in 4.4 seconds.

    There was the president smiling, behind the wheel.

    Only Secret Service with him.

    No Ford people in the truck.

    "I was not nervous. I think he has lots of people to make sure everything will be fine," Farley said. "He got in front of the press and, he goes, 'Watch this.' Then he rolled the truck a little bit forward, stopped and fully accelerated. The truck took off, totally silent, like an electric car does. Dead quiet. It accelerated like nothing I've ever seen. And the press corps was like, 'Holy Cow.'"

    Much more: Biden surprises Ford execs, stuns media at track with F-150 moment

  16. #6141
    Member havnfun's Avatar
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    Something for all the people panicking about man made global warming, A nice relaxing video of a train trip that shows beautiful wild country untouched for an hour and half.


  17. #6142
    Achieve By Unity cyrille's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by havnfun View Post
    Something for all the people panicking about man made global warming, A nice relaxing video of a train trip that shows beautiful wild country untouched for an hour and half.
    You must be blind. There's garbage every 15 yards or less.

    I must admit though, I didn't actually see any global warming.


  18. #6143
    Guest Member S Landreth's Avatar
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    • Copernicus – May 2021 was the 5th warmest May recorded.



    The global-mean temperature for May 2021 was higher than the average for 1991-2020, but less extreme than for most months in the last six years. May 2021 was:

    0.26°C warmer than the 1991-2020 average for May
    the coolest May since 2018
    warmer than any other May in the 1979-2015 period

    Homepage | Copernicus


    • Zeke Hausfather - With five months of the year under our belt, I estimate that 2021 will likely be somewhere between the 4th and 7th warmest since records began, and will be well in-line with the long-term warming trend: https://twitter.com/hausfath/status/1401931829922336773



    • Earth's carbon dioxide levels hit 4.5 million-year high


    The amount of carbon dioxide in the Earth's atmosphere has reached its annual peak, climbing to 419 parts per million (ppm) in May, according to scientists from Scripps Institution of Oceanography and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).

    Why it matters: It's the highest CO2 reading since reliable instrument data began 63 years ago, but evidence shows it's also a peak since well before the start of human history.


    • The rate of increase showed "no discernible impact" from the pandemic-induced economic slowdown, the scientists found.
    • Carbon dioxide is a long-lived greenhouse gas emitted through human activities such as fossil-fuel burning, deforestation and agriculture.


    Threat level: Not only is CO2 now at its highest levels in human history, but one would have to go all the way back beyond the beginning of human history — to the Pliocene Epoch, between 4.1 to 4.5 million years ago — to find a time when Earth's atmosphere held a similar amount of carbon.


    • Data gleaned from ice core records and other indicators of what Earth was like at that time serve as a stark warning for our future on this planet, scientists say.
    • Global average sea levels, for example, were nearly 80 feet higher during the Pliocene than they are today, while the global average temperature was about 7°F above the preindustrial era.
    • Studies show that large forests were located in areas of the Arctic that are now home to tundra.


    Quick take: The world first passed the 400 ppm threshold in 2013, but took just eight years to climb toward the 420 ppm mark. It's an indication of how countries are failing so far to bend the emissions curve dramatically downward in order to slow, and eventually reverse, global warming.


    • The CO2 concentration figures may seem abstract, but they correspond to the risk of tipping points in the climate system that would have profound societal consequences, such as the melting of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet.
    • Numerous studies show that the lower CO2 concentrations are stabilized, the greater the chances that climate change will be more manageable for society and the planet's natural systems.


    Details: The 1.8 ppm rate of increase from 2020 was slightly slower than other recent years, but within the range of natural variability.


    • According to NOAA senior scientist Pieter Tans, the temporary pandemic-related dent in global carbon emissions got drowned out by natural variations that affect the rate at which carbon builds up in the air.
    • Tans, as well as Ralph Keeling, who oversees the Mauna Loa observations from his post at Scripps, told Axios they were not surprised the pandemic, which caused a global emissions cut of about 7% in 2020, failed to slow or halt the growth of atmospheric CO2.
    • They each said net carbon emissions have not declined significantly and for long enough to be noticeable. "As long as we keep emitting, CO2 will keep going up. And that's what we see. Even if we manage to freeze net emissions," Tans said, emphasizing the need to reach net-zero emissions as soon as possible.


    What they're saying:


    • Keeling told Axios that 420 ppm, which the planet is almost certain to exceed next year, is "a psychological threshold." He added, "We're moving deeper and deeper into a territory we almost certainly never would have wanted to get to."
    • Tans emphasized the long-lived nature of CO2, with each molecule lasting in the air for as long as 1,000 years. "In terms of human civilization, these emissions are forever," he said, endorsing plans to drive emissions down to net zero as soon as possible.: https://www.axios.com/earth-carbon-d...77c4be8c8.html




    • Dr. Robert Rohde - Simple comparison between global mean temperature and carbon dioxide.


    This is not the whole story of global warming, far from it, but it is a useful place to start.: https://twitter.com/RARohde/status/1400048250019794948



    Biden administration to suspend Arctic oil leases issued under Trump

    The Biden administration will suspend controversial leases issued under the previous administration for drilling at the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR), it announced Tuesday.

    The leases will be halted amid a further environmental review, which will determine whether they should be reaffirmed, voided or subject to additional measures to lessen their environmental impacts, according to an Interior Department statement.

    An order signed on Tuesday by Interior Secretary Deb Haaland said that a departmental review found "multiple legal deficiencies" in the record supporting the leases.

    These included insufficient environmental analysis including "failure to adequately analyze a reasonable range of alternatives" in a prior environmental review and a failure to properly interpret the law authorizing the lease sales.

    In a separate statement, National Climate Advisor Gina McCarthy said that the move is an "important step forward fulfilling President Biden’s promise to protect the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge."

    "President Biden believes America’s national treasures are cultural and economic cornerstones of our country and he is grateful for the prompt action by the Department of the Interior to suspend all leasing pending a review of decisions made in the last administration’s final days that could have changes the character of this special place forever,” McCarthy said.

  19. #6144
    Guest Member S Landreth's Avatar
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    NOAA – May 2021 was the 6th warmest May recorded and year to date (Jan – May 2021) is the 8th warmest. 2021 is likely to rank one of the 10 warmest years on record

    May 2021


    2021 - Year to Date


    National Centers for Environmental Information (NCEI) formerly known as National Climatic Data Center (NCDC) | NCEI offers access to the most significant archives of oceanic, atmospheric, geophysical and coastal data.


    • Biden moves to reverse Trump opening of Alaska forest to logging


    The Biden administration on Friday began a process to reverse a Trump-era policy that opened vast swaths of the largest U.S. national forest, the Tongass in Alaska, to logging and mining.

    The move is the latest effort to roll back a land use decision made under then-President Donald Trump, reflecting a growing emphasis on conservation over commercial development.

    In a notice posted on a White House website, the administration said it would propose "to repeal or replace" the exemption of the Tongass from the 2001 Roadless Rule that was finalized late last year.

    The Clinton-era rule banned logging, roads and mining in undeveloped forests. Alaska state officials had petitioned for the change because they said the rule has cost Alaskans jobs.

    In a statement, a spokesperson for the U.S. Department of Agriculture, which oversees the Forest Service, said "the Trump administration's decision on the Alaska roadless rule was controversial and did not align with the overwhelming majority of public opinion across the country and among Alaskans."

    On Twitter, Alaska's Republican Governor Mike Dunleavy vowed to "use every tool available to push back" against the Democratic administration's move.

    "From tourism to timber, Alaska's great Tongass National Forest holds much opportunity for Alaskans but the federal government wishes to see Alaskans suffer at the lack of jobs and prosperity," Dunleavy tweeted.

    Environmental groups cheered the decision and urged the administration to repeal the Trump policy entirely.

    "A full reinstatement of roadless protections is a necessity and crucial to preserving America's 'Amazon' and one of our most valuable assets in the climate fight," Andy Moderow, Alaska director of the Alaska Wilderness League, said in a statement.: Biden moves to reverse Trump opening of Alaska forest to logging | Reuters


    • EPA to reinstate air pollution panel disbanded under Trump


    The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) will reinstate a scientific group that looks at air pollution and was disbanded under the Trump administration, a spokesperson confirmed to The Hill on Monday,

    EPA spokesperson Tim Carroll said in an email that the EPA’s Science Advisory Board will issue a call “in the next few weeks” for nominations for the Particulate Matter Review Panel.

    Then-EPA Administrator Andrew Wheeler disbanded the panel, made up of scientists who are considered experts on particulate matter, in 2018.

    It had been tasked with helping the agency to determine a safe level of particulate matter. Long-term exposure to a form of particulate matter has been linked to heart attacks, asthma attacks and premature death.

    At the time, critics blasted the move to disband the panel as anti-science.

    Monday’s news comes just a few days after the agency announced that it would review the Trump administration’s decision not to tighten air quality standards for particulate matter.

    When making the decision to retain the Obama-era standard, Wheeler defended it as “protective of public health.”: EPA to reinstate air pollution panel disbanded under Trump | TheHill

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