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  1. #4926
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    Quote Originally Posted by harrybarracuda View Post
    Yes but examination of ice bores allows them to get hard historical data going back thousands of years, so they know what the CO2 levels have been over that period, and can tie it to historical events such as volcanoes.

    Not quite sure what your point about mining is though. How is that relevant, other than as another example of profit going before people?
    The mining point demonstrates that, for generations, humanity has taken natural resources for granted, and damn the consequences of such exploitation.
    Now all and sundry are on the backs of the Chinese et al, for irresponsible coal mining. Hypocritical set of standards applied by the west. The USA reducing mountains to sea level in order to exploit coal. No standards at all.
    The least the climate change lobby could do is to apply standards consistently.

  2. #4927
    Thailand Expat harrybarracuda's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Switch View Post
    The mining point demonstrates that, for generations, humanity has taken natural resources for granted, and damn the consequences of such exploitation.
    Now all and sundry are on the backs of the Chinese et al, for irresponsible coal mining. Hypocritical set of standards applied by the west. The USA reducing mountains to sea level in order to exploit coal. No standards at all.
    The least the climate change lobby could do is to apply standards consistently.
    The climate change lobby do apply standards consistently.

    However governments are not so reliable.

  3. #4928
    Guest Member S Landreth's Avatar
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    UAH November – 2nd warmest November recorded

    From Roy Spencer (UAH) the science denier – November 2017 (lower troposphere) - UAH Global Temperature Update for November 2017: +0.36 deg. C

    The Version 6.0 global average lower tropospheric temperature (LT) anomaly for November, 2017 was +0.36 deg. C, down substantially from the October, 2017 value of +0.63 deg.: UAH Global Temperature Update for November 2017

    _________

    RSS Lower troposphere (November not included): RSS


    _________

    Belated October 2017 Met Office – 6th warmest October recorded



    Warmer Met Octobers 2016, 2015, 2014, 2005, 2003: https://www.metoffice.gov.uk/hadobs/hadcrut4/index.html

    _________

    Over the past three years, global CO2 emissions from fossil fuels have remained relatively flat. However, early estimates from the Global Carbon Project (GCP) using preliminary data suggest that this is likely to change in 2017 with global emissions set to grow by around 2%, albeit with some uncertainties.




    While the slowdown in emissions over the past few years and the “peaking” of emissions by a number of countries has been cause for cautious hope, this is tempered by the uptick in emissions projected in 2017. According to UN Environment, existing commitments by nations fall well short of what is needed to meet warming targets and emissions will not fall quickly until the world undertakes much more ambitious mitigation actions.: https://www.carbonbrief.org/analysis...ampaign=buffer - https://twitter.com/CarbonBrief/stat...72376576212993

    ________

    Climate updates: progress since the fifth Assessment Report (AR5) of the IPCC: https://royalsociety.org/topics-poli...imate-updates/



    ________

    Venezuela is losing its last glacier



    Venezuela used to have five glaciers. Today, only one remains. The last glacier in Venezuela, the Humboldt glacier, is about to disappear.

    Once Venezuela loses the Humbolt, it will become the first country in modern history to have lost all of its glaciers.

    Their disappearance reduces the availability of drinking water; changes in atmospheric patterns that control rain and temperatures; and a chain reaction of impacts to the surrounding ecosystems that could affect food availability for humans and other species.

    Venezuela is likely to be the first country to lose all of its glaciers, but unfortunately it will not be the last country. According to NASA, scientists have calculated that many tropical glaciers will be gone within a century, and in some cases decades or years. The Pyrenees, in Spain, lost almost 90 percent of its glacier ice over the past century (a quarter disappeared between 2002 and 2008), and the rest is expected to vanish within the next decades. Indonesia, the only country in tropical Asia with glaciers, will likely lose its glaciers by the end of the decade.: Venezuela is losing its last glacier

    _______

    Little note about the pause,…..the deniers used to love to repeat until 2014 then 2015 and finally ended all talk of a pause in 2016 when in 2016 it was recorded the warmest year ever (even at UAH).

    Obama: "a pause in American leadership"

    "It is an agreement that -- even though we have a little bit of a pause in American leadership -- is giving our children a fighting chance," : https://www.rawstory.com/2017/12/oba...limate-change/
    Keep your friends close and your enemies closer.

  4. #4929
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    I remain comfortably perched on the fence.

    Climate aberration over a twenty five year period statistically speaking means pretty much didly squat.

  5. #4930
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    Quote Originally Posted by russellsimpson View Post
    I remain comfortably perched on the fence.

    Climate aberration over a twenty five year period statistically speaking means pretty much didly squat.
    Your post exemplifies the need for much greater knowledge and understanding of the subject.
    How can someone living in Canada be unaware of the climate, and lacking any kind education in such matters.

    Ignorance is not an acceptable excuse, and neither is spending all your waking hours masturbating.

  6. #4931
    Thailand Expat AntRobertson's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by russellsimpson View Post
    I remain comfortably perched on the fence.

    Climate aberration over a twenty five year period statistically speaking means pretty much didly squat.
    Being on the fence is still a win for the efforts of those paid to deliberately muddy the waters.

  7. #4932
    Thailand Expat harrybarracuda's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by russellsimpson View Post
    I remain comfortably perched on the fence.

    Climate aberration over a twenty five year period statistically speaking means pretty much didly squat.
    Any doubts about Climate Change?-s3b0w-jpg
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Any doubts about Climate Change?-co2_graph_rt-gif   Any doubts about Climate Change?-s3b0w-jpg  

  8. #4933
    Thailand Expat harrybarracuda's Avatar
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    In the 2017 issue of NOAA’s Arctic Report Card, scientists report on a body of paleoclimate research that shows that the extent and rate of sea ice decline in the Arctic is unprecedented over at least the past 1,500 years.

    Any doubts about Climate Change?-arc2017_sea-ice-extent-graph_620-jpg


    This time series shows the Arctic sea ice extent in millions of square kilometers over the past roughly 1,500 years. Scientists use climate proxies like sediment/ice cores, tree rings, and fossilized shells of ocean creatures to extend the sea ice extent records back in time. These records show that while there have been several periods over the past 1,450 years when sea ice extents expanded and contracted, the decrease during the modern era is unrivaled. And just as importantly, it is beyond the range of natural variability, implying a human component to the drastic decrease observed in the records.
    The minimum sea ice extent, which occurs each summer, is influenced by the atmospheric circulation, air temperature, and variations in the amount of warm water that flows into the Arctic. Since 1900, waters that enter the Arctic Ocean through the Fram Strait have increased by 2 degrees Celsius (4 degrees Fahrenheit). Meanwhile, proxy records show that the current warming trend in surface air temperatures has not been observed in the Arctic over at least the last 2,000 years.
    Sea ice in the Arctic Ocean has a history much longer than the last 2,000 years. It likely first formed about 47 million years ago. However, perennial—year round—sea ice at the North Pole first occurred 14-18 million years ago. A number of paleoclimate studies have shown that perennial sea ice has existed in the central Arctic for much of the last 350,000 years, with significant regional variability. This variability highlights the importance of expanding the number of paleoclimate reconstructions to better predict which regions are most susceptible to further sea ice loss.
    Throughout geologic times, the amount of sea ice increased and decreased along with changes in temperature, atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations and the ice-age climate cycles. In fact, there were intermittent periods of ice-free conditions in the past 350,000 years up until the “modern” era of sea ice conditions began about 5,000 years ago.
    These ice-free periods usually coincided with times when solar energy reaching the Arctic was at its largest due to small variations in the shape of Earth’s orbit and its axis of rotation. However, since the latter half of the Holocene epoch (about 5,000 years ago), some amount of year-round Arctic sea ice cover has been present. But as we move through the rest of the century, some climate model projections suggest that ice-free Arctic summers will return, possibly as early as 2030, but very likely before 2100.
    The Arctic plays a vital role in our planet’s climate and can serve as a canary in a coalmine for ongoing impacts from human-caused climate change. Understanding how the Arctic is going to change in the future, including changes in sea ice and impacts on Arctic ecosystems, requires a continued effort to develop additional reconstructions like the one above to help scientists better grasp what makes the Arctic Ocean tick.

    https://www.climate.gov/news-feature...ast-1500-years
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Any doubts about Climate Change?-arc2017_sea-ice-extent-graph_620-jpg  

  9. #4934
    Guest Member S Landreth's Avatar
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    Copernicus - November 2017


    November 2017 extended the spell of exceptional global warmth that has now lasted since mid-2015. It was:

    · 0.45°C warmer than the average November from 1981-2010;
    · the third warmest November on record;
    · 0.16°C cooler than the warmest November, which occurred in 2016.

    https://climate.copernicus.eu/resour...ature-analysis

    ________

    JMA – November 2017



    The monthly anomaly of the global average surface temperature in November 2017 (i.e. the average of the near-surface air temperature over land and the SST) was +0.30°C above the 1981-2010 average (+0.64°C above the 20th century average), and was the 3rd warmest since 1891. On a longer time scale, global average surface temperatures have risen at a rate of about 0.72°C per century.

    Five Warmest Years (Anomalies)
    1st. 2015 (+0.54°C), 2nd. 2013 (+0.31°C), 3rd. 2017 (+0.30°C), 4th. 2016 (+0.28°C), 5th. 2001 (+0.26°C): Global Average Surface Temperature Anomalies

    ________

    NASA – November 2017 2nd warmest November recorded: https://data.giss.nasa.gov/gistemp/


    NASA 2017
    · December (2016), January, February – 2nd warmest recorded
    · March, April, May – 2nd warmest recorded
    · June, July, August – 2nd warmest recorded
    · September, October, November – 3rd warmest recorded



    but warmest non-El Niño year recorded: https://twitter.com/ClimateOfGavin/s...10220413292544

    _________

    NOAA – November 2017 was the 5th warmest November recorded: https://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/sotc/global/201711


    _________

    Arctic permafrost thawing faster than ever, US climate study finds


    Permafrost in the Arctic is thawing faster than ever, according to a new US government report that also found Arctic seawater is warming and sea ice is melting at the fastest pace in 1,500 years.

    The annual report released on Tuesday by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration showed slightly less warming in many measurements than a record hot 2016. But scientists remain concerned because the far northern region is warming twice as fast as the rest of the globe and has reached a level of warming that’s unprecedented in modern times.

    “2017 continued to show us we are on this deepening trend where the Arctic is a very different place than it was even a decade ago,” said Jeremy Mathis, head of NOAA’s Arctic research program and co-author of the 93-page report.

    “What happens in the Arctic doesn’t stay in the Arctic; it affects the rest of the planet,” said acting NOAA chief Timothy Gallaudet. “The Arctic has huge influence on the world at large.”

    New research looking into the Arctic’s past using ice cores, fossils, corals and shells as stand-ins for temperature measurements show that Arctic ocean temperatures are rising and sea ice levels are falling at rates not seen in the 1,500 years. And those dramatic changes coincide with the large increase in carbon dioxide levels in the air, the report said.: https://www.theguardian.com/environm...-change-report

    _________

    Analysis: Why scientists think 100% of global warming is due to humans

    the science on the human contribution to modern warming is quite clear. Humans emissions and activities have caused around 100% of the warming observed since 1950, according to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change’s (IPCC) fifth assessment report.

    Carbon Brief’s analysis finds that:

    · Since 1850, almost all the long-term warming can be explained by greenhouse gas emissions and other human activities.
    · If greenhouse gas emissions alone were warming the planet, we would expect to see about a third more warming than has actually occurred. They are offset by cooling from human-produced atmospheric aerosols.
    · Aerosols are projected to decline significantly by 2100, bringing total warming from all factors closer to warming from greenhouse gases alone.
    · Natural variability in the Earth’s climate is unlikely to play a major role in long-term warming.



    In its 2013 fifth assessment report, the IPCC stated in its summary for policymakers that it is “extremely likely that more than half of the observed increase in global average surface temperature” from 1951 to 2010 was caused by human activity. By “extremely likely”, it meant that there was between a 95% and 100% probability that more than half of modern warming was due to humans.

    This somewhat convoluted statement has been often misinterpreted as implying that the human responsibility for modern warming lies somewhere between 50% and 100%. In fact, as NASA’s Dr Gavin Schmidt has pointed out, the IPCC’s implied best guess was that humans were responsible for around 110% of observed warming (ranging from 72% to 146%), with natural factors in isolation leading to a slight cooling over the past 50 years.

    Similarly, the recent US fourth national climate assessment found that between 93% to 123% of observed 1951-2010 warming was due to human activities.

    These conclusions have led to some confusion as to how more than 100% of observed warming could be attributable to human activity. A human contribution of greater than 100% is possible because natural climate change associated with volcanoes and solar activity would most likely have resulted in a slight cooling over the past 50 years, offsetting some of the warming associated with human activities.: https://www.carbonbrief.org/analysis...ampaign=buffer

    It’s closer to 110%: IPCC attribution statements

  10. #4935
    Guest Member S Landreth's Avatar
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    UAH - December 2017 is the second warmest December behind 2015 and it makes 2017 the warmest non El Niño year ever in UAH data records.


    UAH Global Temperature Update for December, 2017: +0.41 deg. C

    The Version 6.0 global average lower tropospheric temperature (LT) anomaly for December, 2017 was +0.41 deg. C, up a little from the November, 2017 value of +0.36 deg. C

    2017 ended up being the 3rd warmest year in the satellite record for the globally-averaged lower troposphere, at +0.38 deg. C above the 1981-2010 average, behind 1st place 2016 with +0.51 deg. C, and 2nd place 1998 at +0.48 deg. C.: UAH Global Temperature Update for December, 2017: +0.41 deg. C
    ___________

    RSS – Lower Troposphere: RSS


    ___________


    2017 was the hottest year on record without an El Niño, thanks to global warming

    2017 was the second-hottest year on record according to Nasa data, and was the hottest year without the short-term warming influence of an El Niño event: https://www.theguardian.com/environm...P=share_btn_tw


    ___________

    Met Office - November 2017, 8th warmest recorded (behind 2016, 15, 13, 12, 05, 04 and 01: https://www.metoffice.gov.uk/hadobs/hadcrut4/index.html


    La Niña cools 2018 chance of being record year

    The Met Office global temperature forecast suggests that 2018 will be another very warm year globally but is unlikely to be a new record due to a moderate La Niña in the Pacific.

    The Met Office forecasts the global average temperature for 2018 to be between 0.88 °C and 1.12 °C, with a central estimate of 1.00 °C, above the pre-industrial average period from 1850–1900. This corresponds to an increase of between 0.28 °C and 0.52 °C, and a central estimate of 0.40 °C above the 1981–2010 long term average of 14.3 °C.

    Professor Adam Scaife, head of long-range prediction at the Met Office, said: “2018 will be very warm globally but is unlikely to exceed the recent record, set in 2016.”: https://www.metoffice.gov.uk/news/re...ature-forecast

    _________

    Extra,….

    Electric and plug-in hybrid cars whiz past 3m mark worldwide - Rapid growth is due to falling battery costs, government incentives and car makers competing to build new models

    The number of fully electric and plug-in hybrid cars on the world’s roads has passed the 3m mark, as manufacturers ramp up their plans for mass production of battery-powered vehicles.

    Industry watchers said the milestone was passed in November, with the growth rate indicating that electric car sales are now running at around 1m a year. The rapid growth is being driven by government incentives, manufacturers launching models for a wider mix of drivers and falling battery costs.

    EV-Volumes, a Sweden-based group that tracks the global electric car market, predicted sales will accelerate next year and bring the total number of battery-powered cars on the roads to around 5m by the end of 2018.

    Next year will see a raft of new models from big manufacturers, including a longer range version of the Nissan Leaf, the world’s best selling electric car, as well as larger models such as the Jaguar iPace. Despite production problems at electric car poster child Tesla, the US company’s flagship mass market Model 3 has been rolling out to customers in the United States.: https://www.theguardian.com/environm...s-3m-worldwide

    Last edited by S Landreth; 03-01-2018 at 06:10 AM.

  11. #4936
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    Global warming having a disastrous affect on the Sahara, covered in snow for only the third time in 40 years.

  12. #4937
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    Quote Originally Posted by S Landreth View Post
    Venezuela used to have five glaciers. Today, only one remains. The last glacier in Venezuela, the Humboldt glacier, is about to disappear.


    So typical of your CLIMATE CHANGE DENIERS.

    So when, Landreth of the hillary hardon, did the other 4 melt away as the world warms up?


  13. #4938
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    NYC sues oil companies for the cost of adapting to climate change

    Any doubts about Climate Change?-nysandyfloodedstation_large-800x533-jpg

    Today, the city of New York joined a number of California cities in suing a group of major oil companies for the costs of climate change.

    The suit claims that these companies—by ignoring their own scientific experts and promoting the continued expansion of fossil fuel use—have created a public and private nuisance in addition to trespassing on city property. It seeks not only damages for past harms the city has suffered, but wants the oil companies to pay the cost of all the adaptation programs that it has had to start or plan.

    In making the announcement, city officials announced they're putting their money where their lawsuit is. Over the next five years, New York City will divest its pension funds, which currently hold just under $200 billion dollars, from fossil fuel companies.

    Creating a nuisance


    New York City isn't the first to file suit against the oil companies. A number of California cities and counties, including San Francisco and Oakland, did so last year. Those suits targeted the same five companies named in the one announced today: Chevron, ConocoPhillips, ExxonMobil, BP, and Royal Dutch Shell. These are the five largest companies, and the suit estimates that they are collectively responsible for over 10 percent of the total greenhouse gasses that have accumulated in the atmosphere since the Industrial Revolution.

    But they clearly weren't the only companies responsible for climate change. And, to a large extent, they simply supplied the fuels that were then combusted by other parties. So why should these five companies be held liable? New York's suit tackles this issue in a number of ways. Echoing some tobacco-related litigation, the city states that "This lawsuit is based upon the fundamental principle that a corporation that makes a product causing severe harm when used exactly as intended should shoulder the costs of abating that harm."

    Beyond that, the suit makes heavy use of a variety of documents that have come to light over the last several years. Collectively, these show that the companies were well aware of the risks of harm from climate change and continued to cast doubt on the science publicly despite that.

    "Disregarding the findings of their own internal scientists and scientific consultants, Defendants re-committed themselves to fossil fuel exploration, production, marketing, and sales over the ensuing decades," the suit claims. "The significant majority of emissions resulting from fossil fuels produced and marketed by Defendants occurred after Defendants became aware of the consequences of climate change."

    To back this up, the suit cites the now-extensive documentation that several companies, notably Exxon, were aware of the growing scientific consensus about the role of carbon dioxide in the climate and even sponsored their own research that came to the same conclusions. The suit notes that all five defendants were members of the American Petroleum Institute, and thus received copies of an expert report that warned of "GLOBALLY CATASTROPHIC EFFECTS" this century and that "'THERE IS NO LEEWAY' in the time for acting." The science was so widely accepted within the companies, the suit argues, that they started designing and modifying their infrastructure to protect against the consequences of climate change, such as sea-level rise.

    Despite their internal actions, the suit notes that the companies were simultaneously engaged in a PR campaign that downplayed our confidence in climate science. They contributed funding to a group called the Global Climate Coalition, which was telling the press that all the carbon emissions would be great for plant life even as internal documents admitted that it could "not offer convincing arguments against the conventional model of greenhouse gas emission-induced climate change."

    As late as the year 2000, Exxon was taking out ads entitled "Unsettled Science" while funding scientists who cast doubt on mainstream science. Rex Tillerson, then-CEO and current Secretary of State, was still raising doubts about scientists in 2015, asking, "What if, [after] everything we do, it turns out our models were really lousy, and we achieved all of our objectives, and it turned out the planet behaved differently because the models just weren't good enough to predict it?"

    Defining harms


    So the legal theory seems to be that the companies were convinced of the harms internally but misled the public about them in order to continue with business as usual. That, New York argues, makes for direct harm against city property: "Global warming is already causing the City to suffer increased hot days, flooding of low-lying areas, increased shoreline erosion, and higher threats of catastrophic storm surge flooding even more severe than the flooding from Hurricane Sandy."

    Included in these arguments are some interesting details. For example, the city already supports programs to help its residents during heat waves, which kill more New Yorkers than all other natural disasters combined—they're expected to get worse due to climate change.

    Extreme precipitation events are up 70 percent in the Northeast over the last 50 years, and these force the city to protect infrastructure like the subway from streets that simply can't drain fast enough. And sea levels that we're expected to reach later this century would mean a 100-year flood would inundate 97 percent of NYC's power generation capacity and 20 percent of its hospital beds. Parks, housing, and other infrastructure are also at risk.

    The city has already paid for some of these issues after Hurricane Sandy and other less notable floods, and it's currently spending money to harden its infrastructure against similar events. There are additional programs that the city's staff also thinks are good ideas, but the money simply isn't available to pursue them.

    All of those issues combine to create the three issues highlighted by the suit. It alleges the oil companies have created a public nuisance for the city: "Defendants' conduct constitutes a substantial and unreasonable interference with and obstruction of public rights and property, including the public rights to health, safety, and welfare of a considerable number of people who reside in and visit New York City." The private nuisance allegation comes about because the city owns some of the properties they have and will be damaged or that will need to be hardened to adapt to future climate.

    Finally, the allegation of trespass is based on the idea that the companies are altering city properties without permission. Their conduct, the suit alleges, "was substantially certain to result in the invasion of property owned by the City, without permission or right of entry, by way of increased heat, sea level rise, storm surge flooding, and flooding from increased intensity and frequency of precipitation."

    One of many?


    What's the city want? It wants the costs it's already spent to protect its infrastructure, property, and residents. It also wants the oil companies to fund all the programs that will be necessary to protect the city against the further changes that climate change will bring. It wants to see its legal costs covered by the oil companies. And, if the companies don't pay up, they city would like to see the court order them to stop any activities that contribute to the alleged harms.

    In many ways, the suit is similar to some of those brought in California, which also seek the current costs of building infrastructure that will protect against the near-inevitable future course of climate change. So far, none of the efforts has been tested in court. But simply by being filed, they pose a risk to the oil companies. The suits themselves are based largely on internal documents that have been leaked over the years. The process of discovery could potentially open up a much larger collection of internal communications, some of which might convince other communities that it's possible to build a case.

    All of the communities that have acted so far are coastal and so have obvious issues due to climate-driven sea-level rise. But it's clear that climate-related issues are creating costs across the country, as communities deal with effects like melting permafrost, an extended wildfire season, and more. If any of the initial suits gain legal traction, then the oil companies could find themselves facing an endless sea of lawsuits.

    New York City's decision to divest, in contrast, is a much smaller threat. Fossil fuels divestment will have to become much more widespread before oil company stocks are at risk of sudden price fluctuations.


    https://arstechnica.com/tech-policy/...limate-change/
    w
    idespread before oil company stocks are at risk of sudden price fluctuations.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Any doubts about Climate Change?-nysandyfloodedstation_large-800x533-jpg  
    Last edited by Neo; 11-01-2018 at 08:07 PM.
    Life should not be a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside in a cloud of smoke, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming "Wow! What a Ride!"

  14. #4939
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    Gonna be interesting when Chevron, ConocoPhillips, ExxonMobil, BP, and Royal Dutch Shell all say "Ok, go spin. We're exporting all oil and gas now and not selling you muppets a drop".

  15. #4940
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    Quote Originally Posted by pseudolus View Post


    So typical of your CLIMATE CHANGE DENIERS.

    So when, Landreth of the hillary hardon, did the other 4 melt away as the world warms up?

    Between 2003 and 2017. The disappearance of the Venezuelan glaciers is well documented.

  16. #4941
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    Quote Originally Posted by DrB0b View Post
    Between 2003 and 2017. The disappearance of the Venezuelan glaciers is well documented.
    During the Merida glaciation in the Pleistocene epoch, the glaciated area had a maximum extent of 600 km2 and covered mountains with a height of at least 3,000 m. At the end of the glaciation, the area covered by the glaciers progressively shrank, and before the start of the Little Ice Age they had possibly all disappeared.[citation needed]

    It is estimated that in 1910 the area covered by glaciers was around 10 km2, divided in two large areas, one embracing Picos Bolívar, Espejo and Concha and the other embracing Picos Humboldt and Bonpland. Possibly a small glaciated area covered the northwest side of Pico El Toro.[5]


    Aerial pictures taken in 1952 show the glaciated area had already shrunk to 0.9 km2 for the Picos Bolívar, Espejo and Concha and to 2.0 km2 for the Picos Humboldt and Bonpland.


    In 2003 almost all the glaciers of the area had disappeared, with the exception of a two small glaciated areas (7.48 Ha on Pico Bolívar and 35.81 Ha on Pico Humboldt). It is forecast that at the current rate Venezuela will lose by 2020 all its glaciers, making it the first Andean country without any glaciated area.
    LOL. yeah alright. Best stretch the hockey stick graph a bit further then Eh?

  17. #4942
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    Whatever.

  18. #4943
    Thailand Expat misskit's Avatar
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    2017 one of hottest in decades

    China experienced its third-highest average temperatures in more than six decades last year as greenhouse gas emissions in the country kept increasing, according to the China Meteorological Administration.


    The average temperature through 2017 was about 10.4 C, more than 0.8 C above the yearly average and the third highest since 1951, according to China Climate Bulletin, which was published by the administration on Monday.


    Monitoring stations across the country observed 12.1 days with temperatures above 35 C, 4.4 days more than average and 1.4 days more than 2016, said the bulletin.


    It also said 437 monitoring stations, or 71 percent of the total, across the country observed extreme hot weather, up by 37 percent from 2016.


    Song Lianchun, chief of the National Climate Center, said China is sensitive to global warming and it's a scientific conclusion that the increasing average temperature in the country is a result of the greenhouse effect.


    China Greenhouse Gas Bulletin, which was released by the administration on the same day, shows that the annual average carbon dioxide concentrations at the three regional stations increased to 413.7 parts per million in Heilongjiang province, 417.7 ppm in Beijing and 410.3 ppm in Zhejiang province.


    The global average stood at 403.3 ppm in 2016.


    Satellite monitoring shows that global average carbon dioxide concentrations in 2016 increased by 3.2 ppm year-on-year from 2015, while in China it was up by 3.7 ppm.


    "Greenhouse gas concentrations in different regions in the country are related to the levels of economic development," Fang Shuangxi, an official with the administration, said at a news conference on Monday.


    "Though carbon dioxide concentrations in the three regional stations in China were higher than the global average, the growth rate of the concentrations in these regions have been declining," he added.


    He said the slowing growth rate shows the achievement China has made in controlling greenhouse gas emissions, though it still needs data from the National Development and Reform Commission to confirm the conclusion.

    2017 one of hottest in decades - Chinadaily.com.cn

  19. #4944
    Thailand Expat VocalNeal's Avatar
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    Yeah but the eruption in PNG will do a little to aid the cooling.

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    Thailand Expat Pragmatic's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by S Landreth View Post
    Venezuela is losing its last glacier
    It's not the only one and the reason why isn't what you may think.

    “But glacial melting is not as straightforward as people like to think,” says Stefan Hasenrath, a glaciologist and emeritus professor at the University of Wisconsin who has done fieldwork on equatorial glaciers in Ecuador, New Guinea and East Africa. He stresses that the notion that warming temperatures are the only reason for equatorial glaciers’ retreat at high altitudes is incorrect. His research on cloud cover on Mount Kilimanjaro points to an important factor: solar radiation. Above a certain altitude,
    solar radiation is the driving factor of glacial retreat because warmer air simply contains more water vapor. At high altitudes this would fall as precipitation and presto, more glacial cover
    Colombia's disappearing glaciers - LatinAmericanScience.org
    Last edited by Pragmatic; 17-01-2018 at 09:19 AM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by pseudolus View Post
    LOL. yeah alright. Best stretch the hockey stick graph a bit further then Eh?
    There you go spewing debunked right wing tin foil conspiracy theories. You really are a right wing shill. We all can see it so you may as well just admit it.

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    LOL Oh snubbings, quite the reverse. You are on Big Oils side. After all, your spiritual leader Maurice Strong was Rockefeller's man. It's about Control, not oil or climate change you silly billy.

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    Quote Originally Posted by pseudolus View Post
    It's about Control, not oil or climate change you silly billy.
    What a crock of shit.

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    Guest Member S Landreth's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DrB0b View Post
    The disappearance of the Venezuelan glaciers is well documented.
    It has been.....


    https://pubs.er.usgs.gov/

    ___________

    you’ve posted here twice to date. Wrong on both occasions. But I do hope you’ll stick around. You might learn something.

    Quote Originally Posted by Pragmatic View Post
    Volcano's are the cause. End of.
    Volcanoes emit around 0.3 billion tonnes of CO2 per year. This is about 1% of human CO2 emissions which is around 29 billion tonnes per year.: https://www.skepticalscience.com/vol...termediate.htm

    Quote Originally Posted by Pragmatic View Post
    .......the reason why isn't what you may think.

    Colombia's disappearing glaciers - LatinAmericanScience.org
    More about this later. I’ll post it when the page flips.
    Last edited by S Landreth; 18-01-2018 at 07:54 AM.

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    2017: warmest year on record without El Niño

    Provisional figures for global average near-surface temperatures confirm that last year, 2017, was the warmest year on record without the influence of warming from El Niño.

    When viewed alongside 2015 and 2016 – both of which were dominated by a significant El Niño – last year was the second or third warmest year for annual global temperatures since 1850.


    Scientists at the Met Office Hadley Centre and the University of East Anglia's Climatic Research Unit produce the HadCRUT4 dataset, which is used to estimate global temperature.

    The HadCRUT4 global temperature series shows that 2017 was 0.99±0.1 °C above pre-industrial levels, taken as the average over the period 1850-1900, and 0.38±0.1 °C above the 1981-2010 average. 2017 is nominally the third warmest year in the HadCRUT4 series. Figures from other global centres place 2017 as second or third warmest.: https://www.metoffice.gov.uk/news/re...e-announcement - https://twitter.com/ed_hawkins/statu...17409848967169


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