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  1. #1126
    Guest Member S Landreth's Avatar
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    • Day 3 of the Jan. 6 committee hearings Thursday, June 16 - 1:00 pm EST


    What to expect: This hearing is expected to focus on Trump pressuring Vice President Mike Pence and conservative California lawyer John Eastman to reject votes from certain states and to send the results back to those states. A judge who helped Pence resist Trump’s demands is expected to testify.

    Trump's efforts to pressure Pence is focus of next Jan. 6 hearing: Cheney

    ___________




    A document filed in federal court on Wednesday appears to lay out a plan in which Trump supporters on Jan. 6, 2021, would have occupied congressional office buildings as well as the Supreme Court and demanded a new election in an effort to prevent President Biden from taking office.

    The document, titled “1776 Returns,” had previously been referenced by prosecutors who charged a group of Proud Boys leaders with seditious conspiracy over their role in the attack on the Capitol last year.

    An attorney representing Zachary Rehl, one of the Proud Boy defendants, attached the document to a motion submitted Wednesday, asking for her client to be released from pretrial detention.

    It’s unclear who drew up the plan or whether the group had agreed to set it into motion. The document does not list the Capitol building itself as one of the targets to occupy.

    Prosecutors said earlier this month that Enrique Tarrio, the former national leader of the Proud Boys, had received the document about a week before Jan. 6 from an unnamed female acquaintance.

    The plan calls for groups to infiltrate and then occupy the Supreme Court and six buildings that house the offices for members of Congress.

    The goal of the plan was to “maintain control over a select few, but crucial buildings in the DC area for a set period of time, presenting our demands in unity.”

    “We need many people as possible inside these buildings,” the document reads. “These are OUR buildings, they are just renting space. We must show our politicians We the People are in charge.”

    While the plan did not call for storming the Capitol building on Jan. 6, prosecutors suggested earlier this month that Tarrio was referencing the plan that day while communicating with Proud Boys who were participating in the riot.

    The chief demand outlined in the plan was for a new presidential election, to be conducted with only in-person voting using paper ballots and monitored by the National Guard.

    The document ends by calling out House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy (R-Calif.), Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.), then-Vice President Mike Pence and the billionaire Microsoft founder Bill Gates. “We the People are watching you,” the documents warns the group.
    Keep your friends close and your enemies closer.

  2. #1127
    Guest Member S Landreth's Avatar
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    • Day 3 of Jan. 6 committee hearings



    ___________




    New emails obtained by the U.S. House committee investigating the Jan. 6, 2021, riots reportedly show that Virginia "Ginni" Thomas, the wife of Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas, was in contact with conservative attorney John Eastman, a central figure in the investigation.

    The Washington Post reports that the committee has obtained email correspondence between Thomas and Eastman, a former professor at Chapman University, who had written a detailed plan to attempt to persuade then-Vice President Mike Pence to throw out the 2020 election results on Jan. 6.

    Pence did not, instead releasing a statement hours before Congress met to certify the election for Joe Biden informing both the president and the public that he didn't have the constitutional power — or any intention — to intervene with the country's vote.

    The content of the emails — or whether they were between only Eastman and Thomas or part of a larger group — have not yet been made public, but the Post notes that their existence sheds more light on Thomas' efforts to have the election overturned in Trump's favor.

    The Post reported earlier this week that Thomas "pressed 29 Republican state lawmakers in Arizona ... to set aside Joe Biden's popular vote victory and 'choose' presidential electors."

    The bipartisan committee investigating the riots also obtained 29 texts between Thomas and former White House Chief of Staff Mark Meadows. In the messages, which were reported by The Washington Post and CBS News, Thomas beseeched Meadows, 62, to do what he could to keep Trump in power, despite Biden's win.

    Three days after the election, on Nov. 6, Thomas wrote Meadows: "Do not concede. It takes time for the army who is gathering for his back."

    Thomas has also previously acknowledged that she attended the rally that preceded the Capitol riots on Jan. 6, though she told The Washington Free Beacon that she left before then-President Trump addressed the crowd.

    Thomas also insisted she "played no role with those who were planning and leading the Jan. 6 events."

    Thomas' attempts to persuade lawmakers not to certify Biden's election — and her contacts with those close to the former president — have intensified questions about whether it poses a conflict of interest for her husband, and if he should recuse himself from Supreme Court cases related to the 2020 presidential election.

    Another new report, by The New York Times, details how Eastman — who previously clerked for Thomas — said in an email after the 2020 presidential election that some Supreme Court justices were engaged in a "heated fight" regarding whether they should take up a case involving Wisconsin poll results.

    Eastman, meanwhile, remains a key figure in the committee's investigation into the riots and the events leading up to them.

    In March, a federal judge said Trump likely broke the law when he and Eastman enacted a plan to overturn the election, and justified that plan with allegations of election fraud.

    "But President Trump likely knew the justification was baseless, and therefore that the entire plan was unlawful," Judge David Carter wrote.

    Elsewhere in the ruling, Carter wrote that Eastman and Trump "launched a campaign to overturn a democratic election, an action unprecedented in American history. Their campaign was not confined to the ivory tower — it was a coup in search of a legal theory. The plan spurred violent attacks on the seat of our nation's government, led to the deaths of several law enforcement officers, and deepened public distrust in our political process."

    The committee investigating the deadly riots said in a court filing in March that Trump and his allies — including Eastman — could potentially be charged by the Department of Justice with criminal violations for their role in the event.

    In a statement issued that month, Committee Chairman Bennie Thompson said he believes "Eastman's emails may show that he helped Donald Trump advance a corrupt scheme to obstruct the counting of electoral college ballots and a conspiracy to impede the transfer of power."

    Thompson noted, however, that the select committee "is not conducting a criminal investigation."

    _______________




    A new photo obtained exclusively by ABC News shows then-Vice President Mike Pence and his family in hiding after rioters broke into the Capitol on Jan. 6 and he was evacuated from the Senate floor.


    ABC News is publishing the image for the first time on the eve of the House Jan. 6 committee's hearing Thursday focused on former President Donald Trump's pressure campaign against Pence.

    In it, Pence can be seen with members of his family -- second lady Karen Pence, his brother, Rep. Greg Pence and his daughter -- in the vice president's ceremonial office just steps from the Senate floor.

    Taken just minutes after the mob had breached the Capitol and as Pence and his family were evacuated from chamber by his Secret Service detail, the photo shows Karen Pence hurriedly closing the curtains in the room, as her daughter looks on with fear.

    According to a source who was in the room, the second lady could see rioters outside the Capitol, so she closed the curtains, worried that the attackers would see her and her family.

    The photo was taken after the mob had already breached the Capitol, some of them chanting "Hang Mike Pence."

    This and other photos were taken by the former vice president's official photographer, Myles Cullen, who was with Pence throughout the day and night of Jan. 6.

    While they were previously described in "Betrayal: The Final Act of the Trump Show," they have never before been made public.

    Minutes later, Pence and his family were rushed downstairs to a loading dock beneath the Capitol complex.

    In another White House photo obtained exclusively by ABC News, you can see Pence after he returned to the Capitol with his daughter -- working on the speech he would give when the joint session of Congress reconvened to certify the election of Joe Biden.

    As seen in another photo ABC News obtained, Pence returned to the House chamber later that night, to preside as Congress successfully certified Biden's victory.

    "Today was a dark day in the history of the United States Capitol. But thanks to the swift efforts of U.S. Capitol Police, federal, state and local law enforcement, the violence was quelled. The Capitol is secured, and the people's work continues," Pence said.

    ______________




    The Justice Department on Thursday revealed a deepening rift with the Jan. 6 House select committee, accusing the panel of a “failure” to share its 1,000 witness transcripts.

    DOJ officials say those documents would aid the prosecution of people who breached the Capitol, including leaders of the Proud Boys.

    “The Select Committee’s failure to grant the Department access to these transcripts complicates the Department’s ability to investigate and prosecute those who engaged in criminal conduct in relation to the January 6 attack on the Capitol,” DOJ wrote in a letter Wednesday, signed by Assistant Attorneys General Kenneth Polite, Jr. and Matthew Olsen, as well as U.S. Attorney Matthew Graves.

    The DOJ officials said it was “critical” that the panel provide prosecutors “copies of the transcripts of all its witness interviews.”

    The letter was the latest reflection of escalating tensions between House investigators and Justice Department prosecutors in recent weeks. It marked the first time prosecutors directly and publicly accused the select committee of undermining efforts to impose criminal penalties on those responsible for the storming of the Capitol on Jan. 6, 2021.

    Prosecutors agreed Thursday to delay a scheduled August trial of the leadership of the Proud Boys, a pro-Trump militia group, citing the “prejudice” caused by the select committee’s public hearings, which are ongoing for much of this month. The leaders are facing seditious conspiracy charges for their activities on Jan. 6. The proposed trial delay to December — backed by some defendants — would require the approval of the federal judge handling the case.

    In addition to the transcript dispute, prosecutors are facing increasing complaints from defense attorneys that the Jan. 6 panel releasing selected details of their investigation — including in currently ongoing public hearings — is unfair to their clients. They are demanding access to all the records and have expressed concerns that they might all be abruptly made public right in the middle of a Proud Boys trial.

    Indeed, the letter emerged publicly Thursday after prosecutors

    Rep. Bennie Thompson (D-Miss.), chair of the Jan. 6 select committee, has previously indicated concerns about the Justice Department’s blanket request for the committee’s transcripts.

    “My understanding is they want to have access to our work product. And we told them, no, we’re not giving that to anybody,” he said last month.

    The panel has interviewed more than 1,000 witnesses. Members have emphasized their investigation is ongoing and will continue until the panel releases a final report later this year.

    Members of the committee have also publicly criticized DOJ for what they’ve perceived as its slow action to pursue potential cases against Donald Trump and members of his inner circle. Those tensions grew recently when DOJ declined to prosecute former Trump chief of staff Mark Meadows and close aide Dan Scavino for defying Jan. 6 select committee subpoenas.

    _______________


    • Anti-vax doctor Simone Gold pleads guilty in Capitol riot case


    Simone Gold, a hydroxychloroquine-promoting doctor who breached the United States Capitol building on January 6, 2021, received a harsh scolding from a judge on Thursday over what he said was lack of genuine remorse for her actions.

    As reported by WUSA 9's Jordan Fischer, Gold on Thursday told the court that she had suffered significant professional consequences due to her decision to enter the Capitol during the riots.

    "My reputation has been shredded," said Gold, who earlier this year pleaded guilty to one charge of unlawfully and knowingly entering and remain in a restricted building and ground.

    Judge Christopher Cooper, however, did not appear sympathetic to Gold's plight, and he questioned whether she truly felt remorse for what she did.

    Among other things, he pointed to an interview she did with the Washington Post in which she said she feared photos of her inside the Capitol building would be a distraction from her work advocating against taking vaccines for the novel coronavirus.

    Cooper also told Gold he was concerned that he heard a lot about how taking parts in the riots had affected Gold personally but nothing about the five people who had died during the siege of the Capitol.

    "I think you well knew what you were doing," he said, shortly before sentencing her to 60 days in prison and ordering her to pay a fine of $9,500.: https://twitter.com/JordanOnRecord/s...36888423800832 - Judge scolds MAGA-rioting doctor after she complains about her 'shredded' reputation
    Last edited by S Landreth; 17-06-2022 at 03:22 AM.

  3. #1128
    Guest Member S Landreth's Avatar
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    Next scheduled hearing is Tuesday, June 21, 2022 at 1:00 pm EST. Little break from the hearings, so.......



    More than 840 people have been arrested for storming the U.S. Capitol building on Jan. 6, 2021, with charges ranging from obstruction of an official proceeding to assault. But 17 months after the attempted insurrection, a significant number of rioters are still awaiting their sentencing.

    Only around a quarter of those arrested—185 individuals—have received criminal sentences, while the rest are waiting for their trials or haven’t yet reached plea agreements. According to the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the District of Columbia, 80 defendants were sentenced to periods of incarceration, with longer prison terms for those who engaged in violence or threats. So far, the median prison sentence for the Jan. 6 rioters is 45 days. An additional 57 rioters have been sentenced to periods of home detention, while most sentences have included fines, community service and probation for low-level offenses like illegally parading or demonstrating in the Capitol, which is a misdemeanor.

    Hundreds of additional cases are expected to be adjudicated in the coming months, with a number of sentencing hearings already on the calendar this fall.

    Here’s a look at what happened to 14 of the most high-profile Jan. 6 rioters.

    Robert Scott Palmer: 63 months in prison

    The Florida man who hurled wooden boards and a fire extinguisher at police officers guarding the Lower West Terrace tunnel of the Capitol was sentenced to more than five years in federal prison—the longest sentence given to anyone charged in the Jan. 6 riot.

    Devlyn Thompson: 46 months in prison

    Thompson took part in the rioting for nearly three hours on Jan. 6, during which time he assaulted a police officer with a metal baton. He also tried to throw a speaker at the police, but missed and ended up injuring another rioter.

    Lonnie Leroy Coffman: 46 months in prison

    Coffman drove to Capitol Hill from Alabama on Jan. 6, 2021, in a pickup truck loaded with powerful weapons, and is believed to have been the most heavily armed defendant during the attack. In his truck, investigators found a small arsenal of molotov cocktails, a 9mm handgun, a rifle, a shotgun, hundreds of rounds of ammunition, large-capacity ammunition feeding devices, a crossbow with bolts, machetes, camouflage smoke detectors and gas-filled Mason jars used to make napalm (a kind of homemade bomb). Coffman, age 72 at his sentencing in April, was also carrying two handguns at the time of his arrest. All the guns were loaded.

    Nicholas Languerand: 44 months in prison

    Court documents show that Languerand, a QAnon follower, threw various objects at officers with the U.S. Capitol Police and Metropolitan Police Department, including an orange traffic barrier and two stick-like objects. The officers were protecting the Lower West Terrace entrance to the Capitol.

    Jacob Anthony Chansley: 41 months in prison

    Chansley—a self-described shaman and a follower of the QAnon conspiracy theory—is one of the most recognizable Jan. 6 rioters, thanks to viral photographs of his outlandish getup.

    Scott Kevin Fairlamb: 41 months in prison

    Videos from the Capitol riot show Fairlamb climbing on inauguration scaffolding, pushing a police officer into a group of people and punching the officer’s face shield. Court filings also indicate that Fairlamb briefly entered the Capitol.

    Greg Rubenacker: 41 months in prison

    The Long Island DJ who recorded himself smoking marijuana inside the U.S. Capitol building was sentenced to three years and five months in prison after pleading guilty to all 10 charges he faced, including civil disorder and committing an act of physical violence on Capitol grounds.

    Matthew Ryan Miller: 33 months in prison

    Draped in a Confederate flag, the 21-year-old Maryland man was seen on video throwing objects at police officers and scaling the walls of the Capitol building. According to court documents, Miller, age 23 at his sentencing in May 2022, threw a full beer can and batteries in the direction of law enforcement. He also sprayed a fire extinguisher directly into the tunnel onto police officers. His lawyer claimed he was drunk and high at the time.

    Cleveland Meredith, Jr.: 28 months in prison

    Meredith traveled from Colorado to attend the “Stop the Steal” rally that led to the attempted insurrection at the Capitol, but later told investigators that he arrived too late in the evening. The day afterward, on Jan. 7, he sent a family member in Georgia a text message threatening to kill House Speaker Nancy Pelosi. Meredith’s mother contacted the FBI, and members located him at a Holiday Inn a mile from the Capitol.

    Michael Curzio: 6 months in prison

    Curzio, who has ties with a white supremacist gang and was at the front of the crowd on Jan. 6, pleaded guilty to one misdemeanor count and served the maximum sentence of six months in jail. He participated in the Capitol riot just two years after he was released from an eight-year prison sentence for attempted murder.

    Gracyn Dawn Courtright: 1 month in prison

    While she was inside the Capitol, Courtright, then age 23 and a senior at the University of Kentucky, took a photo of herself in a mirror and afterward posted it to Instagram, along with the words, “INFAMY IS JUST AS GOOD AS FAME.” She shared her participation in the riot on Instagram multiple times, and someone took a screenshot and reported her.

    Robert Chapman: 18 months of probation

    One week after Jan. 6, Chapman told someone on the dating app Bumble that he took part in the riot. “I did storm the capitol,” he wrote in a message. “I made it all the way to Statuary Hall!” The person Chapman confessed to then replied, “We are not a match.”

    Richard Barnett: Awaiting sentencing

    Barnett was photographed with his foot on a desk in Pelosi’s office during the violence at the Capitol.

    Matthew Greene: Awaiting sentencing

    Greene is the first self-identified member of the Proud Boys—a far-right extremist group—to plead guilty to obstructing Congress and conspiring to obstruct law enforcement during the Capitol attack.

    Extra - A list of defendants charged in federal court in the District of Columbia related to crimes committed at the U.S. Capitol in Washington, D.C, on Wednesday, Jan. 6, 2021.

    ___________




    Amajority of Americans believe that Donald Trump should face criminal charges in relation to the January 6, 2021 attack on the U.S. Capitol, according to a new poll.

    The survey found that 54 percent of respondents backed the idea of the Department of Justice (DOJ) indicting the former president over the Capitol riot, compared to 37 percent who oppose the suggestion.

    The data from Navigator Research also revealed that Republicans were the only partisan group whose majority do not want to see Trump being charged over the Capitol riot and his attempt to overturn the 2020 presidential election. Members of Congress were inside the Capitol building certifying Joe Biden's win at the time of the attack by pro-Trump supporters.

    Nearly three-quarters of Republicans (71 percent) polled opposed the DOJ filing criminal charges against Trump for his involvement with the attack, with 21 percent supporting the idea.

    In comparison, 86 percent of Democrats and 47 percent of Independents polled said they supported Trump facing prosecution over the Capitol riot.

    Four out of five Black respondents (80 percent) also believed Trump should be charged, with 49 percent of white people, 58 percent of Hispanic voters and 65 percent of Asian American and Pacific Islanders backing the idea, according to the survey.

    The DOJ and Attorney General Merrick Garland have been urged by House panel members to bring charges against Trump over January 6, based on the evidence already publicized and what will be presented during the committee's hearings.

    Garland has given no real indication of whether the DOJ intends on charging Trump with a crime, but said that he and the other prosecutors are keeping up to date with the House committee's presentations.

    "I am watching, and I will be watching all the hearings, although I may not be able to watch all of it live," he said on June 13. "And I can assure you that the January 6 prosecutors are watching all the hearings."

    The poll by Navigator Research was conducted from June 9 to June 13 among a sample of 998 registered voters. Navigator Research describes itself as "a trusted resource for developing and distributing winning progressive messages and polling on the most pressing issues of the moment."

    The poll showed that 71 percent of Americans said they did not support the actions of the Trump supporters who stormed the Capitol on January 6, with 22 percent stating they supported them and seven saying they were not sure.

    The survey also found that 13 percent of the Democrats polled supported the actions of Trump supporters on January 6, with one-third (33 percent) of Republicans stating they back their actions.

    A majority of all demographics taking part in the survey said they have heard "a lot" or "some" about the January 6 House Select Committee's live televised hearings.

    Despite Trump and other MAGA personalities insisting that no one would care about the January 6 proceedings, even 59 percent of Republicans said they had been keeping up with the hearings, including 25 percent who heard "a lot" about them.

    Overall, 64 percent of those polled said they supported the committee's investigation into the Capitol attack, compared to 28 percent who said they were opposed.

    The investigation even has fairly strong support among Republicans, with 40 percent of those taking part in the survey saying they back it, compared to 51 percent who said they were opposed.

    ____________



    The Jan. 6 committee has obtained new information to connect the dots on some well-known aspects of Jan. 6 — including former President Trump's tweets — Axios has learned.

    Why it matters: The committee is giving Americans the most palpable and detailed sense yet of how close the nation came to a full-blown constitutional crisis, producing consistent bombshell revelations, with more likely to come.

    The big picture: The select committee is making the same case House Democrats made during Trump's second impeachment a year and a half ago: that Trump incited the violence that day at the Capitol.


    • But the panel's seven Democrats and two Republicans have far greater access to key evidence than the impeachment managers did — including subpoenaed documents and closed-door testimony, in some cases provided unwillingly by those close to Trump.


    Some of the most compelling presentations have rested on materials that were already public, contextualized with new evidence.


    • An upcoming hearing may include new details surrounding Trump's "Be there, will be wild!" tweet on Dec. 19, 2020, which urged supporters to converge on D.C. on Jan. 6 — and how it spurred organizing on far-right message boards, according to a source close to the committee.
    • The committee's most recent hearing delved into a Jan. 5 statement, dictated by Trump, that claimed Vice President Mike Pence believed he had the authority to overturn the election results.


    Details: The hearings have developed more detail about some extremists’ intent to harm or kill lawmakers. They've shown how close they came to potentially harming Pence.


    • They've shown much more than was previously known about how close Trump came to making coup supporter Jeffrey Clark the attorney general.
    • They've yielded much more about Trump’s own state of mind, demonstrated absence of remorse, callousness about Pence’s safety, and more details about pardon requests.


    Between the lines: The committee has consistently invoked to a key impeachment tactic to synthesize its evidence: drawing a connection between Trump’s public comments and the actions of rioters.


    • The most recent hearing featured video of Trump calling for Pence to “come through for us,” followed by clips of rioters making violent threats towards Pence.
    • The first hearing included a nearly 10-minute long, chronological montage of Jan. 6, which spliced together videos of the Capitol violence with Trump’s inflammatory tweets at the time of each clip.
    • The second hearing, which focused on Trump's baseless election fraud claims, concluded with clips of Jan. 6 rioters echoing his claims.


    Zoom in: Rep. Jamie Raskin (D-Md.), who was the lead House manager in Trump's second impeachment, is also a member of the Jan. 6 committee.


    • He told Axios' Alayna Treene his focus in the investigation has been on "the activation and the mobilization of the mob and the domestic violent extremist groups."
    • That aspect of Jan. 6 — how Trump assembled the mob and directed them to the Capitol — will be at the center of the committee's penultimate hearing according to Vice Chair Liz Cheney (R-Wyo.).


    "Imagine if we had an ounce of what the Jan. 6 committee has now," Rep. Eric Swalwell (D-Calif.), one of the House impeachment managers, told Axios' Margaret Talev.


    • "When we tried Trump in the Senate, many of the windows at the Capitol were literally still shattered," he recalled. "The impeachment trial team approached dozens of Trumpworld witnesses. No one wanted to cooperate. Everyone said, 'See you in court,' which would have taken years.
    • "So we relied on Trump's public statements, tweets, rallies, to prove his intent — and the footage on the ground on the 6th to show the carnage. But there were a lot of gaps as to what Trump knew and what he did or didn't do to stop the insurrection.
    • "With the passage of time — and the stench of Trump becoming more, not less, pungent — witnesses came forward. Over 1,000. And now there's a clear picture of what Trump knew and did. Without any of that, we still managed to convince seven GOP senators that Trump was guilty."


    Rep. David Cicilline (D-R.I.) another one of the House managers, told Axios that, "What I've learned is ... the level of planning and the sophistication of this scheme." He said it "demonstrates unequivocally the president was responsible for the events of Jan. 6."

    The bottom line: The Jan. 6 committee wants to succeed where the impeachment managers fell short.
    Last edited by S Landreth; 19-06-2022 at 05:00 PM.

  4. #1129
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    Trump's demanding 'equal time'.
    I hope they give it to him.
    (I'm pretty sure he doesn't know what he's asking)

  5. #1130
    Guest Member S Landreth's Avatar
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    Today, the 4th Jan. 6 committee hearing. 1:00pm EST

    ____________




    Eastman told Trump their plan was illegal, a Pence aide said.

    Eastman knew the other legislative branches would dismantle their scheme.

    Eastman reportedly shrugged off the possibility of inciting a riot.

    Eastman asked for a pardon after the attack.

    Despite Trump’s claims otherwise, Pence allegedly told him “many times” he disagreed with him.

    Weeks before the riot, Pence thought he didn’t have the power to overturn the vote, his aide said.

    Trump snapped at Pence in the heat of their Jan. 6 disagreement, according to Ivanka Trump.

    The mob got dangerously close to Pence.

    The crowd surged when Trump tweeted his anger at Pence.

    A Pence adviser said he believes Trump remains a threat to democracy.

    Five takeaways: Jan. 6 panel bears down on Pence pressure campaign | The Hill

    _____________




    Nearly six in 10 Americans think former President Donald Trump should be charged with a crime for his role in the Jan. 6 attack on the U.S. Capitol, according to an ABC News/Ipsos poll.

    The big picture: The findings represent a slight increase since the start of a series of public hearings by the House special committee investigating the Jan. 6 insurrection.

    Driving the news: 58% of those surveyed think the former president should be charged with a crime for his role in the riot, according to the poll conducted on June 17 and 18.


    • An ABC News/Washington Post poll from April found that 52% thought Trump should be charged, while a poll from the same organizations in January 2021 found that 54% believed he should be charged.


    More details: The same portion of Americans (58%) think Trump bears either a great deal or a good amount of responsibility for the events of Jan. 6, the June poll revealed.


    • Sixty percent of Americans also believe the Jan. 6 committee is conducting a fair and impartial investigation.
    • However, only 34% of Americans said they were watching the committee's hearings very or somewhat closely.


    ____________


    • Jan. 6 committee wants to talk to Pence and may subpoena him


    Members of the Jan. 6 select committee said Sunday they may subpoena former Vice President Mike Pence, the Associated Press reports.

    Driving the news: “We’re not taking anything off the table in terms of witnesses who have not yet testified,” said Rep. Adam Schiff (D-Calif.) on CNN's "State of the Union" over the weekend asked about subpoenaing Pence.

    “We would still, I think, like to have several high-profile people come before our committee,” he added.

    He said a Pence subpoena is “certainly a possibility. We're not excluding anyone or anything at this point."

    Rep. Bennie Thompson, D-Miss., the committee's chairman, said the Jan. 6 panel was “engaging” with Pence’s lawyers, AP reports.

    The big picture: The Jan. 6 panel recently zeroed in on a scheme by former President Trump and his allies to pressure Pence to reject electors in order to overturn the 2020 election.

    Between the lines: The Jan. 6 committee has received much information about Trump's call to Pence on the morning of Jan. 6 in which Trump pleaded for Pence to stop the certification of electoral votes, AP reports. But the committee has yet to hear Pence's side of the phone call.

    "It started off [in a] calmer tone ... and then it became heated," former White House lawyer Eric Herschmann told the committee last week, Axios' Andrew Solender reports.

    Julie Radford, Ivanka Trump's chief of staff, said Trump called Pence the "p-word" on that call.

    Retired Lt. Gen. Keith Kellogg, Pence's former national security adviser, said Trump also told Pence that he was "not tough enough to make the call."

    Worth noting: The committee is also interested in hearing from Virginia “Ginni” Thomas, the wife of Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas. She reportedly played an active role on Jan. 6 and Trump's efforts to overturn the election. https://www.axios.com/2022/06/20/jan...pence-subpoena

    ________________

    Extra……..


    • Facebook removes Greitens ‘RINO hunting’ video


    Facebook on Monday removed a video from Missouri Republican Senate candidate Eric Greitens in which he holds a shotgun and urges supporters to “get a RINO hunting permit.”

    A spokesperson for Meta, Facebook’s parent company, said the video showing Greitens breaking into a house with a gun in hand was removed “for violating our policies prohibiting violence and incitement.”

    Greitens hit back with a Facebook post accusing the tech giant of censoring him, similar to accusations a number of Republicans have made against social media platforms.

    “Facebook CENSORED our new ad calling out the weak RINOs. When I get to the US Senate, we are taking on Big Tech,” he wrote.

    In the 38-second video, also posted to Twitter, Greitens touts his background as a Navy SEAL and says he is going “RINO hunting,” using the acronym for “Republican in name only.” He’s surrounded by men in U.S. armed forces uniforms who break into a seemingly empty house with their guns pointed.

    Twitter did not remove the video, but added a notice on the tweet that said: “This Tweet violated the Twitter Rules about abusive behavior. However, Twitter has determined that it may be in the public’s interest for the Tweet to remain accessible.”

    Twitter will also limit engagement with the post. Users will be able to quote tweet the post, meaning they’re able to post it with a comment, but will not be able to like, reply to or retweet it.

    Greitens resigned as Missouri governor in 2018 amid allegations that he sexually assaulted and blackmailed his hairstylist. Greitens insisted the interactions were consensual, but a state legislative investigation deemed the allegations of abuse credible.

    Republicans sounded alarms when he announced he would be running to succeed retiring Sen. Roy Blunt (R-Mo.), especially after ex-wife earlier this year accused him of abusing her and their children while they were married.

    The Greitens campaign denied the allegations from his ex-wife.

    A poll from The Hill and Emerson College released earlier this month found Greitens leading the field of GOP gubernatorial candidates in Missouri with 26 percent support heading into the Aug. 2 primary election. https://thehill.com/policy/technolog...hunting-video/

    ____________


    • Trump privately admitted he lost election to Biden: Ex-White House aide


    An ex-aide to former President Donald Trump said Sunday that Trump privately admitted he lost the 2020 election to Joe Biden.

    Driving the news: Alyssa Farah Griffin, the former White House director of strategic communications, said on CNN's State of the Union that Trump "blurted out watching Joe Biden on TV, 'Can you believe I lost to this guy?'"

    The big picture: The Jan. 6 committee seeks to prove in a series of public hearings this month that the former president tried to overturn the election knowing that he lost.




    Yes, but: Griffin added that she thinks proving intent will be difficult.


    • "I'm not of the mind that this is going to take down Donald Trump in a legal sort of way," she said. "But I do think it's going to inform the public about a man who lost and couldn't do what we've done for the entirety of our history, which is allow a peaceful transition of power."


    What's next: The Jan. 6 committee will meet for another public hearing on Tuesday at 1 p.m. https://www.axios.com/2022/06/19/tru...n-alyssa-farah

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    Day 4


    Trump and his aides pressured state officials to change election results


    The Jan. 6 committee made the case during its fourth hearing on Tuesday that former President Trump and his key allies failed to find proof of fraud in the 2020 election, but tried to pressure GOP election officials to push that false narrative anyway.
    Why it matters: The pressure campaign resulted in violent threats to election officials and went so far as to attempt to hand physical copies of false elector votes to Vice President Mike Pence.
    The big picture: Through a mix of taped, closed-door testimony from Justice Department officials and public testimony from key election officials, the committee revealed the breadth of the Trump team's efforts — namely former Trump attorneys John Eastman, Rudy Giuliani and Jenna Ellis — to get state officials to change the election results.

    • The Trump campaign had a call script for appeals to legislators that urged them to support appointing fraudulent pro-Trump electors in states where Biden won.
    • Meanwhile, state election officials testified that they repeatedly asked for Trump's attorneys to offer proof of their fraud claims — but never received them.
    • The committee also showed the human toll the false claims spread by Trump and his team has on election officials and poll workers, which include death threats and home break-ins.

    Driving the news: Rep Liz Cheney (R-Wyo.), the vice chair on the panel, opened the hearing by arguing Trump knew his claims that the 2020 election was rife with fraud were “nonsense."

    • "As you listen to these tapes, keep in mind what Donald Trump already knew at the time he was making those calls — he had been told over and over again that his stolen election allegations were nonsense," Cheney said.
    • "Donald Trump did not care about the threats of violence. He did not condemn them, he made no effort to stop them; he went forward with his fake allegations anyway."


    Mark Meadow's role in Georgia

    In one of the hearing's biggest revelations, Rep. Adam Schiff (D-Calif.) said the committee obtained text messages indicating Trump’s former chief of staff, Mark Meadows, wanted to send Georgia election investigators “a sh**load of POTUS stuff, including coins, actual autographed MAGA hats, etc.”

    • Georgia Secretary of State Brad Raffensperger's Chief Operating Officer Gabriel Sterling detailed his efforts to debunk Trump and his team's false narrative.
    • Sterling said he "lost it" at a December appearance after learning of violent threats to his staffers.
    • Sterling's presser was met with sharp criticism from Trump and others.
    • Sterling testified on Tuesday: "It was frustrating. Often times I felt our information was getting out but there was a reticence of people that needed to believe it because the president of the United States, who many looked up to and respected, was telling them it wasn't true despite the facts."

    The committee played audio between Trump and Raffensperger, which showed the extent of how hard the former president pushed him to find cases of fraud in Georgia.

    • Trump rattled off a series of false claims, each of which Raffensperger debunked in real time while speaking with Trump, the audio showed. Trump could be heard asking Raffensperger to "find 11,780 votes, which is one more than we have."
    • "The numbers are the numbers and they don’t lie," Raffensperger testified. "Every single allegation we checked, we ran down the rabbit trail to make sure our numbers were accurate."

    Raffensperger also testified that Trump supporters repeatedly threatened his life and his family, and some eventually broke into his daughter-in-law's home.

    DOJ rubbished claims of election fraud

    Former Trump DOJ officials testified in taped depositions that they told Trump there wasn't widespread fraud in Georgia, but he pressured state officials to find claims of fraud anyway.

    • Former Attorney General Bill Barr testified that he told Trump that allegations of voter fraud in Fulton County, Georgia, "had no merit": "We didn't see any evidence of fraud in the Fulton County episode," he said.
    • Richard Donoghue, former acting deputy attorney general, told the committee he told Trump: "I said something to the effect of, 'Sir, we’ve done dozens of investigations, hundreds of interviews. The major allegations are not supported by the evidence developed.'”

    Trump's campaign pressured Michigan's Laura Cox

    • Former chairwoman of the Michigan GOP, Laura Cox, told the Jan. 6 committee that fake Republican electors were planning to hide in the Michigan capitol building overnight to satisfy the requirement they meet in the state Senate chamber: "I told him in no uncertain terms that was insane and inappropriate."
    • Republican National Committee Chairwoman Ronna McDaniel privately testified that the Trump campaign asked her to help facilitate an alternate slate of electors from Michigan.


    Rusty Bowers' emotional testimony

    Rusty Bowers, Arizona House Speaker and a Republican, publicly testified on Tuesday he never told "anyone," "anywhere," "any time" the election was rigged.

    • Bowers emphasized that Trump's statement earlier Tuesday claiming he had previously told the then-president that he won in Arizona "is also false."
    • Bowers also said he demanded Giuliani and Ellis offer proof of the claims of fraud he was peddling, but they never did. "We've got lots of theories, but we just don't have the evidence," Giuliani said, according to Bowers.
    • Bowers said he told Eastman he was being asked to do something illegal — something that had never happened in the history of the country. Eastman's response, according to Bowers, who said he was paraphrasing: "Just do it, and let the courts figure it out."

    Inside the room: Cheney hugged Bowers after his in-person testimony. Reps. Adam Schiff (D-Calif.) and Zoe Lofgren (D-Calif.) shook his hand.

    Poll worker “Shaye” Moss recounts death threats

    Wandrea’ ArShaye "Shaye" Moss and her mother, Ruby Freeman, poll workers in Georgia, “became the target of nasty lies spread by President Trump,” committee Chairman Bennie Thompson (D-Miss.) said.

    • Moss testified in person that she received "a lot of threats wishing death upon me, telling me that I'll be in jail with my mother and saying things like 'Be glad it's 2020 not 1920.'"
    • Moss said she is still afraid to leave her home: "I don't go to the grocery store at all. I haven't been anywhere at all. I've gained about 60 pounds. I just don't do anything anymore. I don't want to go anywhere."
    • Freeman said in a closed-door deposition she had to leave her home as Jan. 6 approached amid concerns about threats and violence.
    • “If the most powerful person in the world can bring the full weight of the presidency down on an ordinary citizen who is merely doing her job, with a lie as big and heavy as a mountain, who among us is safe? None of us. None of us,” Schiff said after questioning Moss.

    Implications for members of Congress


    Parting line: Cheney made a plea to her Republican colleagues and voters at home who have been skeptical to believe the Jan. 6 committee's findings.

    • "Do not be distracted by politics. This is serious. We cannot let America become a nation of conspiracy theories and thug violence," she said.
    Last edited by S Landreth; 22-06-2022 at 01:47 PM.

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    • The next January 6 committee hearing will begin at 3:00 pm (EST) today. Two more will follow but will be delayed until early July.


    Five takeaways from the latest Jan. 6 hearing

    Trump was the driving force behind effort to nullify Biden votes

    Attorneys warned it was illegal — and Giuliani acknowledged ‘evidence’ issues

    More involvement from lawmakers in Trump’s plans

    Total disregard for legal exposure of Trump staff and state officials

    Panel dedicated to refuting Trump claims

    The committee played a series of Trump’s most fantastic claims of voter fraud.

    “The real truth is I won by 400,000 votes, at least,” he says in one clip of his call with Raffensperger.

    ___________




    Nearly 4 in 10 registered voters say they watched at least part of last week’s daytime hearings held by the House select committee investigating the Jan. 6, 2021, attack on the Capitol, according to a new Politico-Morning Consult poll.

    Most respondents — 58 percent — said they had heard at least some about last week’s two daytime hearings, while 21 percent said they had heard nothing at all.

    But when asked about a new claim that Kimberly Guilfoyle, who worked for Trump’s 2020 campaign and is Donald Trump Jr.’s fiancée, was paid $60,000 for her speech at the Ellipse rally on Jan. 6, only 3 in 10 respondents said they had heard at least some about the revelation.

    https://www.axios.com/2022/06/22/jan...ng-poll-voters

    ____________

    • Cheney calls on ex-White House lawyer to testify before Jan. 6 panel


    The House committee investigating the Jan. 6 riots at the Capitol is working to secure testimony from former Trump White House counsel Pat Cipollone, Rep. Liz Cheney (R-Wyo.) said Tuesday.

    “Our evidence shows that Pat Cipollone and his office tried to do what was right. They tried to stop a number of President Trump’s plans for Jan. 6,” Cheney, who is a vice-chair of the committee, said at the close of Tuesday’s hearing.

    “We think the American people deserve to hear from Mr. Cipollone personally. He should appear before this committee, and we are working to secure his testimony,” Cheney added.

    Cipollone served as White House counsel from October 2018 through the end of the Trump presidency, and he defended the former president during both of his impeachment trials.

    Cipollone’s name came up during the first public hearing the committee held earlier this month when former White House senior adviser Jared Kushner was shown testifying that he dismissed Cipollone’s threats to resign ahead of Jan. 6 as “whining.”

    “You know, him and the team were always saying, ‘Oh we’re going to resign, we’re not going to be here if this happens, if that happens,’ so I kind of took it up to just be whining, to be honest to you,” Kushner said in private deposition.

    Members of Cipollone’s team, including Eric Herschmann, have testified to the committee in deposition shown in prior hearings that they felt legal theories floated by the likes of Rudy Giuliani and John Eastman had no legal standing and were potentially dangerous.

    Cheney signaled on Tuesday that future hearings will shed more light on what Cipollone said and did in the weeks before the Jan. 6 riots.

    “Our committee is certain that Donald Trump does not want Mr. Cipollone to testify here,” Cheney said. https://thehill.com/homenews/house/3...e-jan-6-panel/

    ____________


    • Jan. 6 panel subpoenas filmmaker with access to Trump family


    The House committee investigating the Jan. 6 attack is probing new sources for information on former President Trump, his children, and Mike Pence, issuing a subpoena to a documentary filmmaker.

    British filmmaker Alex Holder said in a statement Tuesday that he had turned over not only footage he captured as the riot was unfolding at the Capitol, but also interviews he conducted from September 2020 and onward as he documented Trump’s reelection campaign.

    That includes interviews with Trump, Pence, Ivanka Trump, Jared Kushner, Donald Trump Jr. and Eric Trump.

    “When we began this project in September 2020 we never could have predicted that our work would one day be subpoenaed by Congress,” Holder said in a statement shared on Twitter.

    “As a British filmmaker I had no agenda coming into this. We simply wanted to better understand who the Trumps were and what motivated them to hold onto power so desperately.”

    The subpoena, first obtained by Politico, specifically asks for “any raw footage pertaining to discussions of election fraud or election integrity surrounding the November 2020 presidential election.”

    The subpoena was sent last week, as the committee began public hearings that included footage of depositions with Ivanka Trump and Kushner.

    But the committee ended its last hearing with a message to those that have not yet spoken to the panel, asking those who may have information to please step forward. https://thehill.com/policy/national-...-trump-family/

    ___________

    Just for fun.

    • Nebraska Congressman Don Bacon (R) says he will not support former President Donald Trump


    "When it comes to the primary I will not be supporting him. I'll be looking for better candidates. I want to win in our district," Bacon said. "We lost our district by eight points at the presidential level and I ended up winning mine by five, roughly. So I think we should be looking for somebody that can win in the suburban areas." https://www.ketv.com/article/watch-w...ation/40381786 - https://twitter.com/AnaCabrera/statu...32670988292098

    ____________

    Extras

    • Proud Boys leader is 'broke and jobless' — and needs to tell 'his side of' January 6: attorneys


    On Tuesday, CBS News' Scott MacFarlane reported that defense counsel representing Proud Boys leader Enrique Tarrio are trying to garner sympathy for him in a new court filing.

    Tarrio, the filing says, is "locked up, broke, [and] jobless" and ready to "tell his side of the January 6 story."

    Tarrio, who was denied jail release last month, was recently slapped with seditious conspiracy charges for his role in the January 6 attack on the U.S. Capitol. This comes after leaders of the paramilitary group the Oath Keepers were hit with similar charges.

    The Proud Boys are a self-styled "Western Chauvinist" group with links to state and local GOP organizers and ties to white supremacists.

    They played a key role in the effort to storm the Capitol, believing that they could prevent the certification of President Joe Biden's electoral win if they disrupted Congress from counting the electors.

    Documents have revealed the extent of the Proud Boys' plan to invade the Capitol complex, including using a "covert sleeper" to set up an appointment and block traffic to keep police out. https://www.rawstory.com/enrique-tar...ys-2657538264/

    ___________

    • Former lawmaker and Capitol rioter will spend more days in jail than he did in the West Virginia legislature


    Derrick Evans served 40 days as a West Virginia state legislator, but will spend 90 days in jail after being sentenced for his role in the Jan. 6 attack on the U.S. Capitol.

    "Perhaps one of the more prominent defendants charged so far in the Justice Department’s sprawling Capitol riot investigation, Evans faced more serious charges than most other defendants because 'he was a leader in this riot. He was a leader on the ground, he was a leader on social media, and he was a leader in his state,' prosecutor Kathryn Fifield said Wednesday in DC District Court," CNN reported.

    Evans resigned after being arrested two days after the coup attempt.

    "In a video that Evans live-streamed to his public Facebook account and later deleted, he was approximately 20 feet away from the Rotunda Doors before they were breached. He narrated what he saw and heard, making remarks such as 'Here we go! Here we go! Open the doors,' and 'The door’s cracked We’re goin’ in!' Once he made it through the doors, Evans exclaimed, 'We’re in! Derrick Evans is in the Capitol!' Evans entered the Capitol at approximately 2:40 p.m. He walked through the Rotunda and Statuary Hall and left the building approximately 10 minutes later," the Department of Justice said.

    Evans pleaded guilty to a felony charge of civil disorder.

    “I’m not a violent or destructive person. I’m a good person who unfortunately got caught up in the moment," Evans argued at sentencing.: https://www.rawstory.com/derrick-evans-jail-jan-6/

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    Marjorie Trailer Greene says there’s a mass stabbing problem in the UK.



  11. #1136
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    Day 5 - Jan. 6 Committee hearings



    Trump told DOJ officials 'just say it was corrupt, and leave the rest up to me'

    ____________




    1. Pardon revelations

    At least four GOP House members — Reps. Matt Gaetz (Fla.), Mo Brooks (Ala.), Louie Gohmert (Texas) and Andy Biggs (Ariz.) — asked Trump for pardons in the final days of the administration, the select committee revealed Thursday.

    The asks of the Justice Department ranged from bizarre to inappropriate

    2. Rosen said he began fielding calls from Trump even before he officially stepped into his role.

    The Department of Justice was met with a barrage of requests from Trump: that they publicly back his baseless claims of election fraud; that they file lawsuits alongside his campaign; that they announce a special legal counsel to investigate the matter; and, later, that they send letters to states asking them to hold off on certifying their election results while the DOJ investigated alleged fraud.

    3. Trump was increasingly desperate as Jan. 6 approached

    Thursday’s witnesses portrayed Trump as increasingly desperate to reverse the election results as Jan. 6 got closer, ramping up his pressure campaign through a series of conversations that would culminate in an explosive White House meeting on Jan. 3.

    4. DOJ leaders rallied against Clark

    Anticipating that Trump might try to install Clark as acting attorney general in a last-ditch effort, Rosen, Donoghue and Engel said they worked fervently to head off the possibility.

    Donoghue and Engel quickly decided that they would resign should Trump replace Rosen with Clark.

    5. New figure emerges linking Trump’s campaign lawyer to internal DOJ scheme

    Rep. Liz Cheney (R-Wyo.) revealed new details about an attorney at the Department of Justice who helped Clark draft a letter to state officials in Georgia requesting they delay certifying their votes while prosecutors investigated election fraud allegations.

    _____________




    The poll found that 64 percent of respondents believed the attack was planned and 30 percent believed it was spontaneous.

    Democrats were more likely to believe the attack was planned — only 13 percent said it was spontaneous — while Republicans were more divided. Forty-nine percent of Republicans said the attack was planned, compared to 46 percent who said it was spontaneous.

    Nearly 6 in 10 respondents believe former President Trump bears at least some responsibility for the storming of the Capitol, with 41 percent saying he bears a lot of responsibility.

    And…….

    Almost 6 in 10 say they are following Jan. 6 panel’s work closely

    More than half of Americans said they are following the House select committee investigating the Jan 6, 2021, Capitol attack slew of hearings closely, according to a new Quinnipiac University poll.

    The poll, published on Thursday, found that 58 percent of respondents said they are following the committee’s hearings closely, with 26 percent following the hearings “very” closely and 32 percent following the hearings “somewhat” closely.

    Seventeen percent of respondents said in the poll that they are not following the committee’s hearings that closely and 24 percent of those surveyed said they are not following the hearings at all, according to the poll.

    __________




    Federal law enforcement this week searched the home of Jeffrey Clark, the former Department of Justice (DOJ) official accused of trying to use the agency to pursue former President Trump’s election fraud allegations, multiple news outlets reported Thursday.

    According to The New York Times, Clark’s suburban Virginia home was searched on Wednesday, a day before the House committee investigating the Jan. 6, 2021, Capitol attack was set to hear from former DOJ officials about the internal strife in the Trump administration following the 2020 election.

    A spokesman for the U.S. attorney’s office in D.C. did not immediately respond when asked for comment on the reports.

    Clark was central to Trump’s pressure campaign at the DOJ and Trump even weighed installing him as attorney general, according to previously released material.

    The mid-level attorney, who specialized in environmental law and was acting head of the department’s civil division at the time, was one of Trump’s top advocates for forwarding election fraud claims. He pushed the DOJ to send a letter to Georgia asking it to hold off on certifying its election results so the Justice Department could announce an investigation into voter fraud there.

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    That pressure campaign came to a head at a Jan. 3, 2021, meeting in which Trump told his DOJ leadership he was weighing ousting them in favor of Clark, who had for days been pushing Trump allies’ claims about voter fraud.

    Then-acting Attorney General Jeffrey Rosen and his deputy, Richard Donoghue, were surprised to get an email from Clark prior to their White House meeting promoting “various theories that seemed to be derived from the internet,” according to Donoghue.

    That included a theory that the Chinese government may have hacked into Dominion voting machines through a smart thermostat. He followed with a request for an intelligence community briefing on the matter along with the request to send the letter to Georgia elections officials.

    ________________

    Extra….


    • Trailer drops for Trump documentary that had footage subpoenaed by Jan. 6 panel


    Viewers are getting a first glimpse of an upcoming documentary on former President Trump that’s of interest to the Jan. 6 committee.

    In the trailer for the Discovery+ documentary “Unprecedented,” released Wednesday, Trump and his adult children are each seen sitting down for interviews.

    “I think I treat people well, unless they don’t treat me well, in which case you go to war,” Trump tells filmmakers.

    Asked if he would be willing to talk about what happened at last year’s Capitol riot, Trump replies, “Yep.”

    https://twitter.com/discoveryplus/st...05693921951745 - https://thehill.com/blogs/in-the-kno...y-jan-6-panel/

    Filmmaker says Trumps did not have editorial control over documentary: https://thehill.com/blogs/pundits-bl...r-documentary/

    _____________


    • Prosecutors broaden conspiracy indictment of Oath Keepers


    U.S. prosecutors broadened a seditious conspiracy charge against Oath Keepers founder Stewart Rhodes and eight co-defendants, the Washington Post reports.

    Driving the news: The indictment, amended on Thursday, alleges the far-right group coordinated to use force to combat the federal government's authority and oppose the transfer of power to President Joe Biden during the Jan. 6 Capitol attack.

    "Rhodes and certain conspirators ... coordinated travel across the country to enter Washington, D.C., equipped themselves with a variety of weapons, donned combat and tactical gear, and were prepared to answer Rhodes' call to take up arms at Rhodes' direction," prosecutors allege in the indictment.

    Why it matters: The indictment adds a new point that allows prosecutors to ask a jury to find Rhodes and co-conspirators guilty at a trial on Sept. 26, per WashPost.

    Yes, but: The new indictment doesn't allege any new facts or add any new charges but gives the Justice Department an opportunity to prove its case.

    The big picture: Rhodes and his co-defendants were arrested and charged last January in connection with events leading up to and including the Capitol riot.

    The indictment alleges Rhodes "conspired with his co-defendants and others to oppose by force the execution of the laws governing the transfer of presidential power by Jan. 20, 2021."

    The Oath Keepers founder and several other co-accused pleaded not guilty to seditious conspiracy in January.

    Worth noting: Prosecutors asked a judge Wednesday to create an ethics inquiry into whether a Trump-allied lawyer is funding the Oath Keepers' defense, Reuters reports. https://www.axios.com/2022/06/24/pro...f-oath-keepers

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    The House committee investigating the Jan. 6, 2021, attack on the Capitol announced a last-minute hearing for Tuesday after previously saying it would pause its series of meetings until July.

    An advisory sent Monday said they would convene to “present recently obtained evidence” but provided no other details.

    The committee last week said they would pause their hearings for two weeks given a wealth of new evidence.

    “We’ve taken in some additional information that’s going to require additional work. So rather than present hearings that have not been the quality of the hearings in the past, we made a decision to just move into sometime in July,” Chairman Bennie Thompson (D-Miss.) told reporters last Wednesday.

    The shift in schedule comes after what committee member Rep. Jamie Raskin (D-Md.) called “a deluge of new evidence.”

    During its third hearing, the committee flashed its website on the screen behind lawmakers, with Thompson asking “those who might be on the fence about cooperating to reach out to us” through the panel’s tip line.

    The panel’s investigators on Thursday also sat for two hours with British filmmaker Alex Holder, who was subpoenaed and asked to turn over video relating to his documentary about the Trumps, including interviews with former President Trump, his adult children and former Vice President Mike Pence.

    The footage was a significant get for the committee, as it includes an interview with Trump and Pence, with whom the committee has yet to secure an interview.

    The committee was also expecting a new batch of documents from the National Archives. However, a letter from acting Archivist Debra Steidel Wall, sent the same day Thompson announced the delay in hearings, says the new information would be released July 8.

    The previous effort to delay hearings into July came after Thompson suggested the panel may consider adding additional hearings. The panel is still set to review the role extremist groups like the Oath Keepers and Proud Boys played in the attack, with another set to review Trump’s inaction despite scenes of violence at the Capitol.

    ______________




    John Eastman, a Trump campaign lawyer who pushed to overturn the 2020 election results, said in a new court filing on Monday that the FBI seized his iPhone and frisked him outside a restaurant during the execution of a search warrant last week.

    Eastman, who has featured prominently in this month’s public hearings of the Jan. 6 House select committee, filed a motion for the return of his property in the U.S. District Court in New Mexico, arguing the warrant was unlawful because it was overly broad, nonspecific and lacked probable cause, violating his Fourth Amendment rights.

    He also said the warrant execution violated his Fifth Amendment rights because agents compelled him to unlock the iPhone with Face ID, forcing him in effect to “testify.”

    “By its very breadth, the warrant intrudes on significant privacy interests, both of [Eastman] and of others whose communications with him are accessible on the seized cell phone,” his lawyers wrote in the motion.

    The Hill has reached out to the Department of Justice (DOJ) for comment.

    Eastman was a central player in Trump’s efforts to overturn the 2020 election, drafting memos arguing that then-Vice President Mike Pence could reject states’ electors and effectively decide the next president himself.

    The House select committee investigating the Jan. 6, 2021, rioting particularly highlighted Eastman’s role during its third hearing this month.

    The warrant on Eastman was executed the day before the Justice Department conducted a search at the home of Jeffrey Clark, a Justice Department lawyer specializing in environmental law who Trump weighed installing as attorney general because he was willing to forward investigations into his baseless claims of election fraud.

    Eastman, who sought a pardon from Trump after the events of Jan. 6, was ordered by a judge this month to turn over troves of emails and documents related to the House panel’s investigation after he sued to block a congressional subpoena.

    The motion filed by Eastman said his phone contained emails and messages related to Jan. 6 and the House panel’s investigation but argued they were protected by attorney-client privilege.

    According to Eastman’s legal team, FBI agents working with the DOJ’s Office of the Inspector General approached Eastman outside a restaurant on Wednesday to execute the search warrant.

    The agents frisked Eastman and took his iPhone Pro 12 before forcing him to unlock it with facial recognition software.

    Eastman said he did not see a search warrant until after his phone was seized. The warrant allowed for the seizure of “any electronic or digital device” and “all information in such devices,” according to Eastman’s court motion on Monday.

    Just hours after the search at Clark’s home Thursday, the committee revealed there appears to be a connection between the two men.

    Kenneth Klukowski began serving at the DOJ just 36 days before President Biden’s inauguration, joining Clark’s staff on December 15, 2020.

    Jan. 6 panel Vice Chair Liz Cheney (R-Wyo.) said that Klukowski had been working with Eastman prior to joining the department and showed evidence suggesting their relationship continued while Klukowski was working under Clark.

    She presented a Dec. 28 email from Trump ally Ken Blackwell requesting that Pence receive a briefing from Klukowski and Eastman and warning “to make sure we don’t over expose Ken given his new position.”

    “This email suggests that Mr. Klukowski was simultaneously working with Jeffrey Clark to draft the proposed letter to Georgia officials to overturn their certified election and working with Dr. Eastman to help pressure the Vice President to overturn the election,” Cheney said.

    _____________




    The Jan. 6 select committee is set to hear from a onetime top aide to former White House Chief of Staff Mark Meadows on Tuesday, an abruptly scheduled hearing whose announcement riveted Washington.

    Cassidy Hutchinson will testify publicly, according to two people familiar with the committee’s plans, after providing crucial testimony to the panel about significant exchanges among top Donald Trump’s inner circle in the weeks before the Jan. 6 attack on the Capitol. Hutchinson replaced her attorney earlier this month as the select committee’s hearings began; her former attorney was the Trump White House’s chief ethics lawyer, and her new attorney is a longtime ally of former Attorney General Jeff Sessions.

    Earlier Monday the select panel announced a surprise hearing, with about 24 hours’ notice, “to present recently obtained evidence and receive witness testimony.” That statement included no details on the testimony or witnesses — and the sudden schedule change intensified intrigue in Washington, where the panel has mounted a carefully choreographed set of hearings about the former president’s election subversion.

    It’s unclear why the panel expedited Hutchinson’s hearing, or whether she will appear alongside other significant witnesses. Hutchinson was present during meetings between Meadows and multiple House Republicans who aided Trump’s effort to overturn the 2020 election. Snippets of her video deposition supported the committee’s contention that several of those Republicans later sought presidential pardons.

    Hutchinson also provided testimony to the committee that Meadows burned some of his papers after a meeting with Rep. Scott Perry (R-Pa.), who was advocating for Trump to replace the leadership of the Justice Department in service of his effort to remain in power. Lengthy excerpts of Hutchinson’s testimony have already been made public as part of the committee’s litigation against Meadows, who sued to block a subpoena for his own testimony and records.

    Among other revelations Hutchinson helped unearth: that the White House counsel informed members of Trump’s team that it believed a plan to authorize alternative slates of presidential electors was illegal. She also described Meadows’ movements on Jan. 6, as chaos began to unfold at the Capitol.

    “I know that he was on several calls during the rally. And I went over to meet with him at one point, and he had just waved me away, which is out of the ordinary,” Hutchinson recalled.

    She also recalled hearing of Trump’s Jan. 6 movements on a Secret Service radio channel that broadcast his location to West Wing aides. That channel helped her discern that Trump was in the Oval Office dining room after his rally speech that afternoon.

    The select committee’s schedule shift was particularly jarring after the panel had foreshadowed a two-week hiatus to assess and analyze a flood of new evidence. The committee’s chair, Rep. Bennie Thompson (D-Miss.), told reporters last week that investigators were poring over new documentary footage from a British filmmaker who had access to Trump and his family before and after Jan. 6. The panel was also anticipating a new tranche of documents from the National Archives, due to arrive on July 8.

    The committee had been planning at least two additional hearings in mid-July; one would be focused on the nexus between Trump’s orbit and domestic extremists like the Proud Boys and Oath Keepers, with the other zeroing in on Trump’s 187 minutes of inaction as violent supporters ransacked the Capitol and threatened the lives of lawmakers and then-Vice President Mike Pence.

    The panel had originally intended to hold roughly a half-dozen public hearings in June to present its findings, though investigators had cautioned the schedule was subject to change as new evidence emerged. The select panel has maintained its investigative work even as it ramped up its pace of hearings.

    Committee aides and members were tight-lipped about the substance of the hearing but were clear that it was scheduled with extreme urgency, interrupting what many of them had planned to be a quieter-than-usual week. Hutchinson’s identity as a witness on Tuesday was first reported by Punchbowl News.

    Documentary filmmaker Alex Holder, who had extensive access to the Trump family, met with investigators last Thursday morning after getting subpoenaed by the select panel for his recordings and testimony. And the panel also sent a letter to Virginia Thomas, the wife of Supreme Court Justice
    Clarence Thomas also known as Ginni, seeking her testimony after evidence emerged she had exchanged emails with Trump-allied attorney John Eastman.

    A Holder spokesman declined to comment.

    The committee is also battling dozens of active lawsuits from Trump allies and other witnesses, including several with key filing dates in the coming weeks. The House is currently out of session until mid-July, though committees are still meeting this week.

    The select committee, until now, has focused its hearings squarely on Trump. Its first hearing laid out what the panel described as a seven-part effort by the former president to overturn the 2020 election.

    Subsequent hearings have focused on elements of the plot it’s seeking to portray: how the Justice Department and Trump campaign debunked false voter fraud claims even as the then-president kept repeating them; how Trump built a campaign around pressuring Pence to single-handedly overturn the 2020 election on Jan. 6; how Trump leaned on state and local election officials to appoint alternative electors; and how Trump pressured his DOJ to legitimize the effort.

    ______________




    Republican Off-Duty Cop Who Was Running for Office Charged with Punching His Democratic Opponent at Pro-Choice Protest

    As seen on video, a man struck a woman during a pro-choice protest outside of the Rhode Island State House in Providence on Friday night. Jennifer Rourke, the Rhode Island Political Cooperative Chairwoman and a Democratic candidate for the state Senate, says she is the woman in that footage. Her attacker was her Republican opponent Jeann Lugo, she said.

    Lugo, an officer for the Providence Police Department, has announced that he dropped out of the race for Senate District 29. He was off-duty at the time of the incident, officials said. Lugo now faces charges and is on paid administrative leave from the department.

    “I’m a reproductive rights organizer & State Senate candidate,” Rourke tweeted on Saturday. “Last night, after speaking at our Roe rally, my Republican opponent – a police officer – violently attacked me. This is what it is to be a Black woman running for office. I won’t give up.”
    Last edited by S Landreth; 28-06-2022 at 05:28 PM.

  13. #1138
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    Fmr. Senate Sgt-At-Arms Michael Stenger Dies Ahead Of Last-Minute J6 Hearing


    Stenger suggested that the alleged role of "professional agitators" needed to be investigated.


  14. #1139
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    WATCH LIVE: Jan. 6 Committee hearings - Day 6


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    ^^ OMG! Tyler Turden says it’s a conspiracy!



    Michael Stenger's Death Before Jan. 6 Hearing Sparks Conspiracy Theories

    Unsubstantiated speculation and conspiracy theories have been spread online following reports that Michael Stenger, the former Senate sergeant-at-arms who oversaw security on January 6, 2021, has died.


    Details on the circumstances around Stenger's death aged 71 are still unknown. Reports that Stenger had died on Monday were revealed by Politico's correspondent Katherine Tully-McManus and Fox News' Chad Pergram.


    "Fox confirms that Michael Stenger, the Senate Sergeant at Arms who was in charge of Senate security the day of the Capitol riot, has died," Pergram tweeted.

    McManus tweeted: "Former Senate Sergeant-at-Arms Michael Stenger died this morning. He joined the SAA team in 2011 after a career with the Secret Service and was appointed SAA in 2018."

    Stenger, along with Paul Irving, the then House sergeant-of-arms, and Capitol Police Chief Steven Sund all resigned from their roles in the wake of the January 6 attack following criticism over the lack of preparation ahead of the riot.

    The New York Times previously reported that Irving and Stenger had both rejected a request from Capitol Police to have the National Guard on standby ahead of January 6.


    The same day as Stenger's reported death, the January 6 committee announced there would be a surprise hearing on Tuesday in order to present "recently obtained evidence and receive witness testimony."

    A number of social media users have attempted to suggest there is a link between Stenger's death and the panel presenting new evidence on Tuesday.

    Tech entrepreneur William LeGate shared a picture of Pergram's tweet about Stenger's death and another tweet detailing Tuesday's surprise January 6 hearing, along with the caption: "Coincidence?"


    Georgia congresswoman Marjorie Taylor Greene, who has spread far-right conspiracy theories in the past, also appeared to suggest there is something suspicious about Stenger's death.


    In a tweet saying how Stenger was found dead, Greene shared a video of Stenger's testimony to a Senate committee in February 2021 regarding the Capitol riot in which he suggested that the alleged role of "professional agitators" needed to be investigated.

    "There is an opportunity to learn lessons from the events of January 6th," Stenger said.


    "Investigations should be considered as to funding and travel of what appears to be professional agitators. First Amendment rights should always be considered in conjunction with professional investigations."


    Conspiracy theorists have long attempted to argue that the January 6 attack was a "false flag" operation orchestrated by Antifa activists or the FBI, with both claims being widely debunked.

    Greene's post sharing Stenger's testimony was also widely shared by a number of popular QAnon accounts on Telegram.


    "Stenger testified that there was paid professional agitators on January 6th. Is that what they didn't want out? I smell desperation," one QAnon telegram account with nearly 200,000 followers wrote.


    Another QAnon account with more than 68,000 followers said: "Do you believe in coincidences??? What was Michael going to talk about at the J6 committee meeting tomorrow? Whatever it was...He had to either silence himself, or BE silenced."

    Other Twitter users have claimed that Stenger was shot outside his apartment while citing unreliable online sources.


    However, as noted by conspiracy theorist expert Mike Rosthchild, there is nothing to suggest that Stenger was due to testify to the January 6 panel on Tuesday, and reports that a man named Michael Stenger was shot appear to have stemmed from a separate incident in Oakland, California, nine years ago.


    "Tons of conspiracy theories about recently deceased Senate Sergeant at Arms on January 6th, Michael Stenger," Rothschild tweeted. "There's no indication he was due to testify, and reports about him shot from a moving car seem to be mixed up with another Michael Stenger, shot in 2013."

    Cassidy Hutchinson, a former top aide to former White House Chief of Staff Mark Meadows, is believed to be the key witness who will give live testimony to the January 6 committee's latest hearing on Tuesday.


    Hutchinson, whose recorded depositions have already revealed a number of explosive allegations during the January 6 hearings, is reported to discuss Meadows' plot to overturn the 2020 election results.


    Capitol Police and the U.S. Senate have been contacted for comment.

    Michael Stenger's Death Before Jan. 6 Hearing Sparks Conspiracy Theories

  16. #1141
    Guest Member S Landreth's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by misskit View Post
    Cassidy Hutchinson...
    was fuckin' great!

    ____________




    Ex-White House aide Cassidy Hutchinson on Tuesday testified that former President Trump and his former chief of staff Mark Meadows were both told attendees at the Jan. 6, 2021, Ellipse rally had weapons and that Trump was frustrated that security measures were keeping those with weapons from joining the rally crowd.

    Hutchinson, a former top aide to Meadows, told the House committee investigating the Jan. 6 Capitol riot that Trump was “furious” that the Ellipse near the White House had not filled up to capacity for a rally on the morning of the Electoral College certification.

    “I was in the vicinity of a conversation where I overheard the president say something to the effect of, ‘I don’t f—— care that they have weapons. They’re not here to hurt me. Take the f—— mags away,’” Hutchinson testified.

    Hutchinson was referring to the magnetometers used by Secret Service to scan for weapons.

    Her deposition about Trump’s frustration and calls to overrule Secret Service was prefaced with testimony that former deputy chief of staff Tony Ornato had informed both Meadows and Trump that some of the attendees at the rally on Jan. 6 were carrying weapons.

    Hutchinson said Meadows did not look up from his phone as he was informed about the security situation at the rally.

    Rep. Liz Cheney (R-Wyo.), the vice chair of House Jan. 6 committee, also introduced audio of radio transmissions from law enforcement ahead of the rally at the Ellipse. Officers can be heard relaying reports of attendees carrying AR-15 rifles and Glock pistols. The committee learned some attendees had brass knuckles, knives, stun guns and other weapons confiscated after passing through the magnetometers.

    “President Trump was aware that a number of the individuals in the crowd had weapons and were wearing body armor. And here’s what President Trump instructed the crowd to do,” Cheney said, prefacing a clip of Trump telling the crowd on Jan. 6, “We’re going to walk down to the Capitol.”

    ____________




    Cassidy Hutchinson, a top aide to former White House Chief of Staff Mark Meadows, delivered the most damning testimony to date in the Jan. 6 hearings, tying former President Trump directly to the attack and providing potential evidence if criminal charges are pursued.

    The big picture: She described multiple incidents of Trump's rage, including reportedly trying to seize the wheel and lunge at his former security detail when the Secret Service would not drive him to join protesters at the Capitol.


    • She detailed Trump's unwillingness to call off the crowds despite knowing some were armed and violence was expected.
    • She also testified that Meadows sought a pardon after the attack on the Capitol and that then-White House Counsel Pat Cipollone warned that Trump and aides could be charged with "every crime imaginable" if Trump joined protesters at the Capitol.


    Why it matters: Hutchinson was a trusted aide to Meadows. Her proximity to the chief of staff and access to the inner workings of the West Wing allowed her to share her extraordinary view into the events leading up to and on Jan. 6, including closed-door conversations and paper trails.

    At the Ellipse on Jan. 6

    Trump was aware his supporters had weapons and wore body armor when he directed them to march to the Capitol following his "Save America" rally, Hutchinson said.


    • "I was in the vicinity of a conversation where I overheard the president say something to the effect of 'I don't f---ing care that they have weapons. They're not here to hurt me. Take the mags [metal detectors] away. Let the people in, they can March the Capitol from here,'" she testified.


    Hutchinson testified that Tony Ornato, Trump's then-deputy chief of staff and Secret Service agent, recounted how the former president lunged at his chief of security, Bobby Engel, while in the presidential limo, "The Beast," when Engel refused to drive him to the Capitol.


    • "The president said something to the effect of, I'm the f---ing president, take me up to the Capitol now," Hutchinson said. When Engel refused, telling him it wasn't safe, Trump "reached up toward the front of the vehicle to grab at the steering wheel," Hutchinson said.
    • "Mr. Trump then used his free hand to lunge towards Bobby Engel, and when Mr. Ornato had recounted the story to me, he had motioned towards his clavicles," Hutchinson said.
    • Engel was in the room and didn't refute Ornato's version of the story, Hutchinson added.


    Inside the White House’s prior knowledge of Jan. 6 attack


    • Hutchinson testified that on the evening of Jan. 2, 2021, following a meeting with Trump's attorney Rudy Giuliani and Meadows, Giuliani asked her: “Cass, are you excited for the 6th? It’s going to be a great day.”
    • He then told her: "we're going to the Capitol" on Jan. 6.
    • "It's going to be great. The president is going to be there. He's going to look powerful. He's going to be with the members. He's going to be with the senators," he said
    • Hutchinson said she later asked Meadows about what Giuliani meant, and Meadows told her: "Things might get real, real bad on January 6."


    Warnings from top national security officials

    National Security Adviser Robert O'Brien called Meadows on Jan. 4 to warn him about potential violence on the Hill on Jan. 6, Hutchinson testified.


    • Meadows later met with Ornato, who mentioned the potential of protestors bringing weapons to the “Save America” rally on the Ellipse, and later, to the Capitol.
    • Ornato mentioned knives, guns, tear gas and spears, among other weapons, Hutchinson said.


    Former Director of National Intelligence John Ratcliffe made clear he worried Trump’s post-election claims of fraud “could spiral out of control and potentially be dangerous either for our democracy or, with the way that things were going, for the 6th,” Hutchinson said.

    White House counsel worried about criminal activity

    The White House counsel repeatedly warned the president and his team he was concerned they would be charged with "every crime imaginable" if they directed Trump's supporters to the Capitol following his Jan. 6 speech on the Ellipse.


    • "On January 3rd, Mr. Cipollone approached me knowing that [Meadows] had raised the prospect of going up to the Capitol on January 6th," Hutchinson testified.
    • Cipollone told her, per Hutchinson: "We need to make sure that this doesn't happen. This would be legally a terrible idea for us."
    • On Jan. 6, before Trump and his top aides — including Hutchinson — walked out to the Ellipse for his speech, Cipollone "said something to the effect of 'Please make sure we don't go up to the Capitol. Keep in touch with me. We're going to get charged with every crime imaginable if we make that movement happen,'" Hutchinson recounted.


    During the attack

    On Jan. 6, immediately after rioters breached the Capitol, Hutchinson said Cipollone marched to Meadows' office and told him: "'We need to go down and see the president now.'"


    • "And Mark looked up at him and said, 'He doesn't want to do anything, Pat,'" Hutchinson recounted.


    In a previous, taped deposition, Hutchinson detailed another exchange between Cipollone and Meadows, in which Cipollone told Trump's then-chief: "We need to do something more — they’re literally calling for the Vice President to be f---ing hung.”


    • According to Hutchinson, Meadows replied: “You heard [Trump], he thinks Mike deserves it. He doesn’t think they're doing anything wrong.”


    After the attack

    Former Secretary of State Mike Pompeo reached out to Meadows following the Capitol attack and informed him that Trump's cabinet secretaries were discussing invoking the 25th Amendment to remove the president from office.


    • "From what I understand, it was more of this is what I'm hearing, I want you to be aware of it," Hutchinson said.
    • Hutchinson also testified that both Meadows and Giuliani sought pardons related to Jan. 6.


    Pressure from Trumpworld

    Committee Vice Chair Liz Cheney (R-Wyo.) shared statements from witnesses suggesting that some within Trump's inner circle tried to intimidate them and pressure them to remain loyal to the former president before participating in the panel's investigation.

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    President Donald Trump threw his lunch against the wall in the White House because he was angry that Attorney General Bill Barr said there wasn't evidence of widespread election fraud sufficient to change the outcome of the 2020 election, former White House aide Cassidy Hutchinson testified on Tuesday.




    Hutchinson walked down the hall and found the White House valet in the dining room, changing the tablecloth. He pointed to the front of the room near the fireplace mantel and television.
    "I first noticed there was ketchup dripping down the wall and there was a shattered porcelain plate on the floor," she said. "The valet had articulated that the president was extremely angry at the Attorney General's AP interview and had thrown his lunch against the wall."



    “Ketchup dripping down the wall “
    You know his “lunch“ was a big Mac, and a large order of fries. I guarantee that fat fuck scraped it off the floor and ate it after everyone left the dining room.

  18. #1143
    Days Work Done! Norton's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by S Landreth View Post
    Cassidy Hutchinson
    A brave young lady who just delivered Trump's political obituary at the risk of her life.

  19. #1144
    Thailand Expat panama hat's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Norton View Post
    A brave young lady who just delivered Trump's political obituary at the risk of her life.
    Hardly. He has been shown to have done far worse over many years and . . . nothing. The population that adores him will continue to do so irrespective of what comes out . . . if it's a video, then it's a fake. If it's testimony then it's a lie. If it's a tape then it's a conspiracy.

  20. #1145
    Guest Member S Landreth's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Norton View Post
    A brave young lady who just delivered Trump's political obituary at the risk of her life.
    The John Dean of the January 6th Capitol Riot.

    At 26 years of age, she has met her goal……..

    She once told her alma mater: “I have set a personal goal to pursue a path of civic significance.”

    ___________

    Trump 'set us up' : Capitol cop 'shocked' former president knew he was endangering police officers

    Metro Police Officer Daniel Hodges has been among those sitting in the audience at the public hearings for the House Select Committee investigating the Jan. 6 attacks. Hodges is most well-known for the footage of him bleeding from the mouth and the doors being used to smash his body on that fateful day.

    After the sixth hearing, one official from the committee went over to him to talk about their gratitude toward the officers for their efforts that day. He told the officer that he was just glad that what he did gave members the time necessary to get to safety.

    Officer Hodges told Raw Story that he doesn't have any insider knowledge, and each time he hears the witnesses, it is new information for him.

    "Most of what I hear is shocking to me," he told reporters outside the committee hearing room on Tuesday. "I mean, hearing that he essentially set us up, yeah, that's shocking."

    He went on to say that he hopes the public understands that the witnesses are professional political people who are all Republicans.

    "They're all about the truth," Hodges continued. "They can't help the fact that the truth is hurtful to or critical of one party."

    He cited Trump's comment that the crowd wasn't there to hurt him, "implying that they were there to hurt someone and he knows who and then he said, yeah, they can march on the Capitol. So, he set us up."

    Hodges went on to say that "the only person Trump cares about is himself. So, I know that he doesn't really care about officers' safety or the safety of Congress as long as he gets what he wants."

    _________

    Seven Capitol Police officers
    sue Trump and his allies over January 6 riot

    Three more law enforcement officers, two Metropolitan Police officers and one Capitol Police officer are suing former President Trump


  21. #1146
    Days Work Done! Norton's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by panama hat View Post
    Hardly. He has been shown to have done far worse over many years and . . . nothing. The population that adores him will continue to do so irrespective of what comes out . . . if it's a video, then it's a fake. If it's testimony then it's a lie. If it's a tape then it's a conspiracy.
    Nah he's done. Wait and watch. More to come.

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    Thailand Expat panama hat's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Norton View Post
    Nah he's done. Wait and watch. More to come.
    You word in God's ear . . . (from the famous Latin phrase 'Aurus populi, Aurus Dei' . . . favoured by Asterix)

  23. #1148
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    Washington Examiner: Hutchinson testimony shows Trump should not hold office ‘ever again’

    The editorial board of the Washington Examiner, a right-leaning publication read widely by supporters of former President Trump, is arguing congressional testimony given by a top White House aide this week disqualifies Trump from ever holding office again.

    Former White House aide Cassidy Hutchinson’s testimony before the select House committee investigating the Jan. 6, 2021, attack on the U.S. Capitol on Tuesday “ought to ring the death knell” for Trump’s political career, the Examiner wrote in an editorial published on Wednesday.

    “What Hutchinson relayed was disturbing,” the publication wrote. “She gave believable accounts of White House awareness that the planned Jan. 6 rally could turn violent. She repeated testimony that Trump not only knew that then-Vice President Mike Pence’s life had been credibly threatened that day but also that he was somewhere between uncaring and actually approving of Pence’s danger.”

    And, the Examiner noted, Hutchinson “told, in detail, that Trump repeatedly insisted that he himself should join his supporters at the Capitol — even after being informed the crowd contained armed elements and that it was breaching the perimeter against an undermanned U.S. Capitol Police force.”

    All of the scenes the former top White House aide conveyed what the outlet said was “a damning portrayal of Trump as unstable, unmoored, and absolutely heedless of his sworn duty to effectuate a peaceful transition of presidential power.”

    The Examiner editorial flies in the face of the punditry across other conservative media about Hutchinson’s testimony, much of which has dismissed her as not credible or relying on hearsay.

    “Trump is a disgrace,” the Examiner asserted. “Republicans have far better options to lead the party in 2024. No one should think otherwise, much less support him, ever again.”

    _____________

    In other news…..

    Fox News flips on Donald Trump during Jan. 6 hearings

  24. #1149
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    Quote Originally Posted by panama hat View Post
    You word in God's ear . . . (from the famous Latin phrase 'Aurus populi, Aurus Dei' . . . favoured by Asterix)
    Yep sometimes a whisper in the right ears helps achieve results.

  25. #1150
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    Quote Originally Posted by S Landreth View Post
    Washington Examiner: Hutchinson testimony shows Trump should not hold office ‘ever again’

    The editorial board of the Washington Examiner, a right-leaning publication read widely by supporters of former President Trump, is arguing congressional testimony given by a top White House aide this week disqualifies Trump from ever holding office again.
    Now that is quite significant. They are normally rabid in their support.

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