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  1. #1101
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    Quote Originally Posted by pickel View Post
    The Blacks or the Aryan Nations?
    Don't leave out the Mexicans. They want a piece of that ass, too.

  2. #1102
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    Quote Originally Posted by bsnub View Post
    Don't leave out the Mexicans. They want a piece of that ass, too.
    His name is Enrique, so it's a conundrum for them too.

  3. #1103
    Guest Member S Landreth's Avatar
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    Live – 8:00 pm EST

    What to expect from tonight's prime-time Jan. 6 hearing

    The Jan. 6 committee’s prime-time public hearing debut will feature never-before-seen recordings and documentation from closed-door depositions with key Trump officials and members of the former president’s family, committee aides tell reporters.

    The big picture: Tonight's televised 90-minute hearing, and sessions next week, will show that the Jan. 6, 2021, attack on the Capitol "was a result of a coordinated, multi-step effort to overturn the results of the 2020 election and stop the transfer of power from Donald Trump to Joe Biden," one committee aide said.


    • "And indeed, that President Donald Trump was at the center of that effort.”
    • "The select committee is also going to lay out a clear indication of ongoing threats to American democracy," said an aide who briefed reporters on condition of anonymity.


    What to watch: Chairman Bennie Thompson (D-Miss.) and Vice Chair Liz Cheney (R-Wyo.) will do most of the talking.


    • The two will deliver opening statements, ask questions of witnesses and present the mountain of evidence they've compiled — including through multimedia presentations.
    • Thompson will "place Jan. 6 in a broader historical context" and talk about it an an "aberration" in the history of American democracy, a committee aide said.


    Depositions: Committee members will detail a "small, but meaningful" portion of the interviews they've conducted with senior officials from the Trump White House, administration and campaign, as well as members of Trump's family.


    • These are said to include previously unseen or unreported details and video and audio as well as documents.


    The witnesses: The public will hear from British documentary filmmaker Nick Quested — who embedded with the far-right Proud Boys, including during the group's private meetings ahead of the insurrection — and Capitol Police officer Caroline Edwards, the first law enforcement officer injured on Jan. 6.


    • Both plan to recount their experiences from the day of the attack, "particularly what they saw and heard from the rioters" a committee aide said.
    Keep your friends close and your enemies closer.

  4. #1104
    Guest Member S Landreth's Avatar
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    If you were unable to watch,...........some highlights.

    The five most dramatic moments from the Jan. 6 hearing

    The Jan. 6 committee's plan to prove Trump’s culpability

    January 6th Hearing: Attack on the Capitol


  5. #1105
    Guest Member S Landreth's Avatar
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    The FBI arrested Michigan GOP gubernatorial candidate Ryan Kelley on Thursday in connection with the Jan. 6, 2021, Capitol riot and searched his Allendale home.

    Kelley was allegedly seen outside the Capitol on Jan. 6 and faces four misdemeanor charges stemming from the riot. The U.S. Attorney’s Office for D.C. confirmed his arrest and said Kelley is set to appear in court later on Thursday.

    In supporting documents released by the attorney’s office, the FBI said it had received multiple tips of Kelley’s presence at the Capitol in the days following the riot.

    The FBI found no evidence that Kelley had entered the Capitol building but alleged he was among the crowd on Capitol grounds for roughly two hours.

    The Hill has reached out to Kelley’s campaign for comment.

    The FBI alleged Kelley was part of the crowd that was attacking and pushing past Capitol Police officers as Congress was in the process of certifying the 2020 election results. At times, he allegedly filmed crowds attacking the officers.

    The agency’s investigators also said Kelley consistently waved his hand to instruct the crowd to move closer to the building, climbing scaffolding set up for President Biden’s inauguration. At one point, Kelley allegedly pulled a covering off a temporary structure, according to the documents.

    He is charged with knowingly entering a restricted area without lawful authority, disorderly conduct, knowingly engaging in physical violence in a restricted area and willfully injuring or committing depredation against federal government property.

    Kelley also spoke at a “Stop the Steal” rally at the Michigan state capitol in November 2020, telling attendees to “stand and fight” for then-President Trump, according to the documents.

    Kelley is slated to face off against four other candidates in the Republican primary on Aug. 2, with the winner taking on Gov. Gretchen Whitmer (D) in November.

    A group of five other Republican candidates were dropped from the primary ballot after the Board of State Canvassers denied their petitions, saying they found thousands of fraudulent signatures.

    At least one candidate has filed a lawsuit to be reinstated on the ballot, but a state appeals court judge rejected that request earlier this month

  6. #1106
    Guest Member S Landreth's Avatar
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    Pretty good start and hope the same will tune it when it continues next week.

    Nearly 20M watched Jan. 6 hearing: Nielsen

    Nearly 20 million people watched Thursday night’s first hearing of the House select committee investigating the Jan. 6, 2021, attack on the U.S. Capitol across broadcast and cable news, according to preliminary ratings figures from Nielsen.

    Each of the major broadcast television news networks preempted their regularly scheduled programming on Thursday to show continuous live coverage of the two-hour hearings.

    ABC took the largest haul of viewers, earning 4.8 million of them, while NBC and CBS carried 3.5 million and 3.3 million, respectively.

    On cable, MSNBC pulled in a whopping 4.1 million viewers during the hearings, nearly four times what the network averages on a typical weeknight.

    Usually dominant Fox News Channel came in second place on cable on Thursday night, averaging 3 million viewers from 8 to 10 p.m. CNN came in third place with 2.6 million.

    Fox took criticism this week for its decision not to air continuous live coverage of the hearings on its main cable channel. The network did not preempt its regularly scheduled opinion shows, featuring hosts Tucker Carlson, Sean Hannity and Laura Ingraham.

    Instead, Fox relegated live coverage of the hearings to Fox Business Network, which ratings figures show pulled in 223,000 viewers from 8 to 10 p.m. Fox also provided its live coverage on various streaming platforms and made it available to its affiliate stations across the country.

    Friday’s preliminary figures are likely to grow and do not include viewers who watched the hearing via streaming service online through YouTubeTV or other platforms.

    The total of nearly 20 million is smaller than other large prime-time political events like President Biden’s State of the Union Address in March, which pulled in 38 million viewers, but is much larger than the audience for a typical congressional hearing.

    A reported 9 million people watched former President Trump’s impeachment trial in 2020 on a typical day during those proceedings on Capitol Hill.

  7. #1107
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    ^It presented a very compelling case. The format was interesting too and not the usual drab dark room with leather chairs. Barr's video was to the point!

  8. #1108
    Guest Member S Landreth's Avatar
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    ^I thought the first showing was well done also and might change the minds of the very few who are/were his supporters but had some doubts about the election results.

    The road ahead for Jan. 6 panel

    What to expect moving forward: Here’s what Cheney said the panel’s subsequent hearings will focus on:


    • During the panel’s second hearing, which is Monday, the panel will argue that Trump knew his claims of widespread voter fraud were baseless.
    • In the third hearing, the committee will make the case that Trump planned to replace Attorney General Jeffrey Rosen so that the Justice Department would spread his election fraud claims.
    • The fourth hearing will focus on Trump’s efforts to pressure former Vice President Mike Pence to overturn the results of the 2020 election.
    • The fifth hearing will focus on Trump’s efforts to pressure state legislators into challenging election results.
    • The final two hearings will focus on how Trump “summoned a violent mob and directed them, illegally, to march on the U.S. Capitol,” Cheney said.


    Upcoming witnesses: Former acting Attorney General Jeffrey Rosen will testify before the committee alongside his deputy Richard Donoghue and Steven Engle, then the head of the Office of Legal Counsel.

    The committee previewed that Justice Department officials would be front and center in its Wednesday review of Trump’s attempt to topple his own leadership and install a mid-level attorney who would forward his claims of election fraud.

    In addition, former Fox News editor Christ Stirewalt said on NewsNation’s “Morning in America” that he will testify next week. Stirewalt was part of the Fox New team that made the decision to call Arizona for Joe Biden on election night. He was later ousted from the network following the 2020 election.

    Last month, Stirewalt was hired by NewsNation, which is owned by The Hill’s parent company, Nexstar Media Group.
    Last edited by S Landreth; 12-06-2022 at 03:05 AM.

  9. #1109
    Im bored AF Backspin's Avatar
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    Right wing domestic terra bro

  10. #1110
    Guest Member S Landreth's Avatar
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    Fox News – Promoting Right-wing domestic terrorists

    Check My Ads - @CheckMyAdsHQ
    Fox News is more fragile than you think. Together we can pressure the ad industry to drop Fox News because of their support of the Jan. 6 insurrection.

    And we have proof that it works.

    Join us:
    Fox

    https://twitter.com/CheckMyAdsHQ/sta...81319783628801


  11. #1111
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    In Jan. 6 cases, 1 judge stands out as the toughest punisher

    An Ohio couple climbed through a broken window of the U.S. Capitol and livestreamed a video of themselves inside. A Texas mortgage broker posed for a selfie in front of rioters breaching the building. An Indiana hair salon owner celebrated on Facebook a day after she joined the pro-Donald Trump mob.

    Federal prosecutors did not seek prison time for any of them after they pleaded guilty to petty offenses for their actions on Jan. 6, 2021.

    The judge had other ideas.

    U.S. District Judge Tanya Chutkan put them all behind bars, describing it as the appropriate punishment for their participation in the riot that halted the certification of President Joe Biden’s victory, sent lawmakers running for their lives and left dozens of police officers beaten and bloodied.

    As the number of people sentenced for crimes in the insurrection nears 200, an Associated Press analysis of sentencing data shows that some judges are divided over how to punish the rioters, particularly for the low-level misdemeanors arising from the attack.

    “We’re asking judges to do what they think is right, and they don’t agree on what’s right,” said Greg Hunter, a lawyer defending several Jan. 6 defendants.

    A House committee that held it first public hearing on Thursday cast a wide net in its investigation of the insurrection, examining how President Trump and his allies tried to undermine the election results. So far, the Justice Department’s criminal investigation has focused primarily on the hundreds of Trump supporters who broke through police barricades, shattered windows, attacked officers and stormed into the Capitol.

    Chutkan, a former assistant public defender who was nominated to the bench by President Barack Obama, has consistently taken the hardest line against Jan. 6 defendants of any judge serving on Washington’s federal trial court, which is handling the more than 800 cases brought so far in the largest prosecution in Justice Department history.

    Chutkan has handed out tougher sentences than the department was seeking in seven cases, matched its requests in four others and sent all 11 riot defendants who have come before her behind bars. In the four cases in which prosecutors did not seek jail time, Chutkan gave terms ranging from 14 days to 45 days.

    Overall, the 20 judges who have sentenced riot defendants have given lighter sentences than prosecutors were seeking in nearly three-fourths of the cases. The judges have exceeded prosecutors’ recommendation for about only 10% of the defendants, according to AP’s analysis.

    Most judges — appointed by presidents of both political parties — have gone easier on defendants than prosecutors wanted in most or all of their cases so far. While some judges have sentenced few Jan. 6 defendants, no other judge besides Chutkan has exceeded prosecutors’ recommended punishment in most of the cases assigned to them.

    “Depending on the judge you get, the same facts could get you anything from probation to months in jail,” said Hunter, the defense lawyer. “When you can literally look at who the judge is, who has been assigned to a case, and know that every defendant is going to get more time or less time because of the judge they drew ... that doesn’t promote respect for the law,” he added.

    In one case, two friends from Indiana, Dona Sue Bissey and Anna Morgan-Lloyd, both pleaded guilty to the same misdemeanor offense for engaging in essentially the same conduct inside the Capitol. Prosecutors did not seek jail time for either, noting their lack of a criminal record.

    Chutkan sentenced Bissey to 14 days in jail. A different judge sentenced Bissey’s friend to probation.

    While Judge Royce Lamberth did not send Morgan-Lloyd to jail, he has also been among the toughest judges on defendants. In one case, Lamberth, who was nominated by President Ronald Reagan, gave a Pennsylvania man two months behind bars for a misdemeanor when prosecutors were seeking only two weeks.

    More than 300 people have pleaded guilty in connection with the insurrection to crimes ranging from misdemeanors to felony seditious conspiracy. Five others have been convicted at trial. A judge decided two other cases without a jury, acquitting one defendant and partially acquitting the other.

    The Jan. 6 cases pose a unique challenge for judges in that even though the riot was unlike anything the country has seen before, hundreds of people were charged only with misdemeanors such as illegal entry that typically do not land first-time offenders behind bars.

    Some judges have criticized prosecutors for what they see as disparities in prosecutors’ charging decisions across the cases and their recommendations for punishment. Chief Judge Beryl Howell, an Obama nominee, has sharply questioned whether prosecutors are letting some rioters off too easy with misdemeanor plea deals even as they describe the insurrection as an attack on democracy.

    To be sure, every case and defendant is different. Also, judges must weigh a slew of factors, including the seriousness of the crime, the person’s criminal history, whether the defendant admitted guilt and showed remorse and what sentences similarly situated defendants have received in order to avoid unwarranted disparities.

    In the case of a Maryland man who sprayed a fire extinguisher at officers defending the Capitol, prosecutors sought more than four years in prison.

    But Judge Randolph Moss sentenced Matthew Ryan Miller to less than three years, noting that the man was just 22 years old on Jan. 6, 2021, was intoxicated when he stormed the Capitol and has shown remorse.

    Before handing down the punishment, Moss said he believes judges have done a good job at ensuring the punishments are consistent while also weighing the individual factors of each case.

    “When one looks at these sentencing decisions that have been made by this court across many judges, it’s remarkable how consistent sentencing has been,” said Moss, an Obama nominee. “When I see differences, I’m able to go back through the record and look at it and understand the basis for those differences.”

    In case after case, Chutkan has expressed her belief that prison can be a powerful deterrent against the threat of another insurrection.

    “Every day we’re hearing about reports of anti-democratic factions of people plotting violence, the potential threat of violence, in 2024,” she said before sentencing a Florida man who attacked police officers to more than five years behind bars — the longest sentence so far in the attack.

    “It has to be made clear that trying to violently overthrow the government, trying to stop the peaceful transition of power and assaulting law enforcement officers in that effort is going to be met with absolutely certain punishment,” she said.

    Of the more than 190 defendants sentenced so far, about 20 admitted to felony charges, including nine who assaulted police officers. The rest pleaded guilty to misdemeanors punishable by no more than one year imprisonment. Prosecutors recommended prison terms in more than 70% of the cases. Judges have agreed to prison in about 45% of them, with terms ranging from nine days to more than five years.

    In one case, prosecutors sought a month in prison for California bartender Kevin Cordon, who pleaded guilty to a misdemeanor. Judge Trevor McFadden, who was nominated by Trump, said jail time was not appropriate given his lack of criminal record.

    “In my experience as a judge and former prosecutor, it’s almost unheard of for someone who is essentially a first-time offender to get jail time for a nonviolent misdemeanor,” McFadden said. “I think it’s important that I’m consistent in sentencing, not only compared with other judges in Jan. 6 cases but also with an eye to how misdemeanors are handled more generally outside of this politically fraught event.”

    McFadden has condemned the Jan. 6 riot as a “national embarrassment,” while also suggesting that the Justice Department was being too hard on those who broke into the Capitol compared with the people arrested during racial injustice protests following George Floyd’s 2020 murder.

    Without naming her colleague, Chutkan slammed McFadden’s suggestion days later.

    “People gathered all over the country last year to protest the violent murder by the police of an unarmed man. Some of those protesters became violent,” Chutkan said during an October hearing.

    “But to compare the actions of people protesting, mostly peacefully, for civil rights, to those of a violent mob seeking to overthrow the lawfully elected government is a false equivalency and ignores a very real danger that the Jan. 6 riot posed to the foundation of our democracy.”

    There have been 826 people charged with offenses related to the attack on the U.S. Capitol.


  12. #1112
    Thailand Expat panama hat's Avatar
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    Nicely done . . .

    Here come da judge, here come da judge . . .



  13. #1113
    Thailand Expat tomcat's Avatar
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    Right-wing domestic terrorists-fvfrraixoaaethl-jpg
    Right-wing domestic terrorists-fvfrrxbwuaqhcjf-jpg
    ...and here's what they look like: recently apprehended anti-gay, anti-Jew neo-Nazi thugs when they aren't hiding behind their masks and bully weapons...ready to attack a Pride parade in northern Idaho...no wonder they hide so well among us...

  14. #1114
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    Right-wing domestic terrorists-homo_neanderthalensis_adult_male_reconstruction-jpeg

    Interesting resemblance.

  15. #1115
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    “We’re asking judges to do what they think is right, and they don’t agree on what’s right,” said Greg Hunter, a lawyer defending several Jan. 6 defendants.
    I think he means they don't agree with him what's right.

    Which is frankly fucking hilarious.

  16. #1116
    Thailand Expat panama hat's Avatar
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    . . . bunch o' mooslims . . . umm . . . A-rabs!! Oh . . . Messicans!!!! Hmm . . .

  17. #1117
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    Quote Originally Posted by tomcat View Post
    and here's what they look like: recently apprehended anti-gay, anti-Jew neo-Nazi thugs when they aren't hiding behind their masks and bully weapons...ready to attack a Pride parade in northern Idaho...no wonder they hide so well among us...
    Buddies of skiddy?

  18. #1118
    Guest Member S Landreth's Avatar
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    Continued hearing starts at 10:00am EST today

    Quote Originally Posted by S Landreth View Post
    ____________




    The documentary filmmaker who testified last week about the Jan. 6, 2021 attack on the U.S. Capitol said on Sunday that he and his crew were aware they had filmed “multiple crimes” when they followed the far-right militia Proud Boys during the rioting for a documentary about division in America.

    Nick Quested told NBC’s “Meet the Press” host Chuck Todd that he saw crimes “on the steps of the Capitol” and “inside the Capitol.”

    After filming the events of Jan. 6, when a pro-Trump mob stormed the U.S. Capitol in an attempt to overturn certification of the 2020 election, Quested decided to cooperate with law enforcement.

    “So I called a friend of mine, who’s a U.S. attorney,” the filmmaker said on NBC. “And he referred me to the criminal department of the D.C. police, who then referred me to the FBI.”

    Quested, who also filmed a secret meeting between Proud Boys leader Enrique Tarrio and Oath Keepers leader Stewart Rhodes in a parking garage ahead of the Jan. 6 rioting, said he “instantaneously” realized they were filming dangerous material throughout the process.

    “We thought it was just an optically bad thing to do when we were shooting it,” Quested said on Sunday.

    Quested testified in front of the House panel investigating the Jan. 6 attempted insurrection last week. He also turned in evidence and video material to the Department of Justice and the select committee.

    Both Tarrio and Rhodes have been charged with seditious conspiracy, a rarely used charge that accuses them of attempting to overthrow the U.S. government. Quested on Sunday said he has not spoken with Tarrio in person since February.

    The documentary filmmaker said he still plans to complete his film, which will detail polarization and divisiveness in America and will “parallel” the committee’s investigation.

    Quested, who comes from England but now lives in the U.S., said he and his crew had to take some time to process what they recorded on Jan. 6.

    “I’m used to covering conflicts abroad and I can process that and I can separate that from my life. But to see it from the country I live in was particularly problematic,” he said on NBC. “I think America has become so divided, I don’t know if there is commonality anymore.”

    __________




    Rep. Elaine Luria (D-Va.) on Sunday said the upcoming hearings from the House select committee investigating the Jan. 6 rioting will focus on former President Trump’s “dereliction of duty” and his attempts to overturn the results of the 2020 election.

    Luria, a member of the panel, told NBC’s “Meet the Press” moderator Chuck Todd the House panel will show in detailed evidence throughout the hearings a comprehensive picture of how Trump attempted to pressure local, state and the federal government to overturn the election, which he continues to claim without evidence was stolen.

    “I frequently say if there weren’t some people in the right places at the right time, this could have turned out very differently,” Luria said of Trump’s efforts.

    The House panel investigating the Jan. 6 rioting held its first June public hearing on Thursday, with plans for three more to be held this coming week on Monday, Wednesday and Thursday.

    Luria said the hearings will “lay out” Trump’s efforts ahead of Jan. 6, which she described as “intense” to witness.

    “We’ve pieced together a very comprehensive tick-tock timeline of what he did,” she said.

    Luria also said Trump is culpable for the rioting on Jan. 6, when a pro-Trump mob stormed the U.S. Capitol in a bid to overturn certification of the 2020 election.

    “This man had the microphone, he could speak to the whole country,” Luria said on Sunday. “His duty was to stand up and say something and try to stop this. So we’ll talk about that, what I see to be his dereliction of duty.”

    ____________




    Arkansas Gov. Asa Hutchinson (R) on Sunday said former President Trump is “politically, morally responsible” for the Jan. 6 riot last year and called for Republicans to do some “soul-searching” after the attack on the U.S. Capitol.

    Hutchinson told “Fox News Sunday” guest host Bret Baier that while he did not believe Trump was criminally responsible for Jan. 6, he does think the former president shares blame for the insurrection.

    “Trump is politically, morally responsible for much of what has happened, but in terms of criminal liability, I think the committee has a long way to go to establish that,” the governor said of the House select panel investigating Jan. 6.

    The panel held its first June public hearing last week with a plan to hold three more this week. Taken together, lawmakers on the committee say the hearings will show Trump was at the center of the Jan. 6 uprising and culpable for the storming of the U.S. Capitol to overturn certification of the 2020 election.

    Republicans who have spoken out against Trump in opposition to election fraud in 2020 or against Jan. 6 have so far drawn his ire, including Rep. Liz Cheney (R-Wyo.) who is the vice chair of the committee. She was stripped of her congressional leadership post as a result.

    The Arkansas governor said Jan. 6 was a “costly error” for democracy and called for the Republican Party to try and understand what happened that day and learn from it.

    “Republicans need to do a lot of soul searching as to what is the right thing here and what is the right thing for our democracy in the future,” Hutchinson said, “and not simply adhere to the basic instincts of some of our base.”

    _____________




    The second of the Jan. 6 committee’s public hearings will convene at 10 a.m. Monday for another day of testimony from key witnesses regarding the events around the Capitol riot.

    The hearing will be focused on Trump's 'Big Lie' — his declaring victory in the 2020 presidential election after being told he didn't have the numbers to win, committee aides said.

    What to watch: Among those testifying Monday will be former Trump campaign manager Bill Stepien and Byung J. "BJay" Pak, the Trump-appointed former U.S. attorney in Atlanta who abruptly resigned the day before the Capitol riot amid pressure from Trump on Georgia officials to overturn election results in their state.


    • A source familiar with Stepien’s thinking told Axios that Stepien "got subpoenaed — not sure he is a ‘friendly’ witness.'”
    • Committee aides declined to say what they expect to hear from Stepien.


    • Former Fox News editor Chris Stirewalt will also be among those testifying. Stirewalt confirmed during an appearance on NewsNation on Friday that he had been "called to testify before the committee."
    • Also appearing Monday will be election attorney Benjamin Ginsberg and former Philadelphia City Commissioner Al Schmidt.
    • Committee Chair Bennie Thompson (D-Miss.) will lead the hearing and Rep. Zoe Lofgren (D-Calif.) is expected to play a key role in the presentation of findings.


    The big picture: The public hearings are intended to lay out the case that former President Trump was responsible for the Capitol riot.


    • On Monday, the committee will walk through Election Day and election night 2020 and how the origin of false election fraud claims unfolded in the weeks that followed, including the hundreds of millions of dollars raised between Election Day and Jan 6.
    • Last week's hearing included explosive revelations about House Republicans who sought pardons for their roles in seeking to overturn the 2020 presidential election, as well as recorded testimony from former Attorney General Bill Barr and Ivanka Trump.
    • Eyewitnesses viscerally recounted what they saw and experienced over the course of the Capitol riot.

  19. #1119
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    Right-wing domestic terrorists-yqmsrj8-png

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    Jan. 6 Committee hearings - Day 2

    Starts at about 48:00 into the video.



    ____________




    Former President Trump, advised by Rudy Giuliani, agreed to falsely declare victory in the 2020 election when it "was far too early to be making any calls like that," Trump advisers testified during the second public hearing into the Jan. 6 insurrection.

    Driving the news: "The mayor was definitely intoxicated," Jason Miller, Trump’s former spokesperson, said of Giuliani.

    ____________




    Former attorney general Bill Barr said he worried in the aftermath of the 2020 election that then-President Trump had become “detached from reality” as Trump made repeated claims about voting fraud.

    Barr told the House select committee investigating the Jan. 6, 2021, Capitol riots in recorded testimony that Trump was making increasingly outlandish claims about rigged voting machines and fraudulent vote dumps that the former president claimed were swinging the 2020 election against him.


    “And the statements were made very conclusory, like, ‘These machines were designed to engage in fraud,’ or something to that effect. But I didn’t see any supporting information for it,” Barr said in testimony aired Monday during a public committee hearing.

    ______________



    Top Trump administration and campaign officials privately tried to convince Trump he lost the 2020 election, but he continued to push the "Big Lie" anyway according to witnesses and taped depositions featured during the second public hearing of the Jan. 6 committee.

    Why it matters: The committee's Day 2 goal was to reveal how deliberately the former president peddled election conspiracies and contradicted facts that were clearly presented to him.


    • They did so by having those closest to Trump in the aftermath of the election present the evidence themselves.


    Between the lines: Those in the former president's inner circle — including Trump's family members, campaign advisers, Justice Department appointees, and his hand-picked attorney general — shared in taped depositions how they repeatedly told Trump his claims the election were stolen were false, but he refused to listen.

  21. #1121
    Guest Member S Landreth's Avatar
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    Jan. 6 committee postpones Wednesday hearing

    The House committee investigating the Jan. 6, 2021 attack on the U.S. Capitol has postponed its Wednesday hearing slated to review former President Trump’s efforts to pressure the Justice Department to investigate his unfounded claims of election fraud.

    In an advisory, the committee said its scheduled hearing on Thursday would still take place but provided no other details.

    Former acting Attorney General Jeffrey Rosen, his deputy Richard Donoghue and Steven Engle, then the head of the Office of Legal Counsel, were all expected to appear before the committee on Wednesday.

    Rosen and Donoghue were some of the committee’s earliest witnesses to voluntarily testify before the panel’s investigators and also spoke with the Senate Judiciary Committee for a report it released in October.

    “In our third hearing, you will see that President Trump corruptly planned to replace the Attorney General so the U.S. Justice Department would spread his false stolen election claims,” Vice Chair Liz Cheney (R-Wyo.) said during the committee’s first prime-time hearing last Thursday to preview its coming work.

    “In the days before Jan. 6 President Trump told his top Justice Department officials: ‘Just say the election was corrupt and leave the rest to me and the Republican congressmen.’”

    Trump’s pressure campaign at the Justice Department was reported just days after President Biden took office in a New York Times report detailing a remarkable meeting during which Trump said he would install a mid-level lawyer as his attorney general in order to forward an investigation into election fraud claims in Georgia and other states.

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    The House committee investigating the attack on Jan. 6, 2021, has released footage tied to a tour Rep. Barry Loudermilk (R-Ga.) gave the day before, showing a man taking photos of hallways in the Capitol complex before ultimately attending the rally itself.

    Loudermilk has acknowledged showing a small group of constituents around House office buildings the day before the attack, but claimed those participants “immediately turned back” once they saw the “chaos” developing at the rally.

    But video shared by the committee claims one of the men was at the riot, showing clips of the unnamed man marching toward the Capitol the morning of Jan. 6

    “There’s no escape Pelosi, Schumer, Nadler. We’re coming for you. We’re coming in like white on rice, for Pelosi, Nadler, Schumer, even you AOC. We’re coming to take you out, and pull you out by your hairs,” the man says, referring to several Democratic leaders and lawmakers: Speaker Nancy Pelosi (Calif.), Senate Majority Leader Charles Schumer (N.Y.), Rep. Jerry Nadler (N.Y.) and Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (N.Y.).

    Surveillance footage shows a tour led by Loudermilk to areas in the House Office Buildings, as well as the entrances to Capitol tunnels.




    Much better video here: https://twitter.com/January6thCmte/s...75019918065666

    He relied on that statement again on Wednesday, saying police “already put this false accusation to bed.”

    “This false narrative that the Committee and Democrats continue to push, that Republicans, including myself, led reconnaissance tours is verifiably false. No where that I went with the visitors in the House Office Buildings on Jan. 5 were breached on Jan. 6; and, to my knowledge, no one in that group was criminally charged in relation to January 6th,” he said.

    But his office on Monday shared a letter from the Capitol Police chief saying of its own review of the footage: “We do not consider any of the activities we observed as suspicious.”

    In some respects, the footage affirms Loudermilk’s description. The video shows him leading a handful of people through different tunnels underneath the Capitol, but they never reach the main building.

    The man can be seen taking photos throughout the tour. It’s that move that alarmed some Democrats after the events of Jan. 6 who feared some lawmakers may have lead “reconnaissance tours” through the Capitol, allowing rally participants to better understand the different passageways that lead into the building.

    “Public reporting and witness accounts indicate some individuals and groups engaged in efforts to gather information about the layout of the U.S. Capitol, as well as the House and Senate office buildings, in advance of Jan. 6, 2021,” Chair Bennie Thompson (D-Miss.) wrote to Loudermilk.

    But the footage is a departure from how Loudermilk described the actions of the group he gave a tour too.

    In an interview given on Jan. 6 as the attack was unfolding, Loudermilk referenced that he had “about a dozen people up here” when asked if he had a chance to talk to any of those involved in the rally.

    “They definitely were peaceful people, people that we met at church. They were supporters of the president, they just wanted to be up here as if it was another rally. We’ve actually checked on them to make sure they are safe,” Loudermilk said in an interview with Georgia-based WBHF.

    “They saw what it was turning into and they immediately turned back down the mall to get away from the crowds here,” he added, noting that some rallygoers came with the intention of creating “chaos.”

    Loudermilk is seen giving the group a tour while wearing an American flag mask. The man seen at the Capitol is shown on footage taking photos throughout the tour.

    “The behavior of these individuals during the Jan. 5, 2021 tour raises concerns about their activity and intent while inside the Capitol complex,” Thompson wrote to Loudermilk.

    The tours the day before the rally drew particular attention as the Capitol complex was still closed to the public due to COVID-19, leading some Democrats to call for an investigation into why some groups that “appeared to be associated with the rally at the White House: were shown through the tunnel system that connects House office buildings to the main Capitol building.”

    Thompson said the “review of surveillance footage showing the above-described tour is consistent with those observations.”

    “The foregoing information raises questions the Select Committee must answer,” he said.

    “While we had hoped to show you the video evidence when you met with us, and since you have thus far declined, the Select Committee provides the video in question for your review,” Thompson wrote.

    The release of the footage comes after Republicans on the House Committee on Administration threatened to release it themselves — a process that would require an outlay of some $200,000 on an external harddrive large enough to store hours upon hours of surveillance footage.

    Capitol Police had likewise refused to release the footage. Still, the House Administration Committee on Monday released a letter detailing its own description of the footage, including that Loudermilk separated from the group at around 1 p.m. that day.

    “The group continued in the Cannon without Representative Loudermilk. At no time did the group appear in any tunnels that would have led them to the U.S. Capitol. In addition, the tunnels leading to the U.S. Capitol were posted with USCP officers and admittance to the U.S. Capitol without a Member of Congress was not permitted on January 5, 2021,” Capitol Police Chief Thomas Manger wrote in the letter.

    “We train our officers on being alert for people conducting surveillance or reconnaissance, and we do not consider any of the activities we observed as suspicious,” he added.

    ______________




    Senior staffers said Trump rejected their advice and listened to a drunk Rudy Giuliani instead.

    Former Fox News political editor: Trump claimed victory based on a “red mirage.”

    William Barr: Claims about defective voting machines were “complete nonsense.”

    Bill Stepien: Trump ran a “structurally and fiscally deficient” reelection campaign.

    Trump’s mind was “made up” on mail-in ballots, regardless of the evidence, Stepien said.

    Investigators said the “Big Lie” was a big windfall for Trump.

    The Justice Department looked into Giuliani and Trump’s fraud allegations in swing states and found nothing.

    _____________





    The Trump era drew many eyeballs around a slew of high-drama political hearings, but last week's Jan. 6 hearing has nearly topped them all.

    The big picture: The Jan. 6 committee tried hard to grab America's fleeting attention by holding the hearing in primetime and by enlisting a former network news exec in the production.

    Be smart: The Jan. 6 committee has a much higher degree of control about what gets presented than in other high-profile hearings: It can selectively choose who speaks and when information gets presented for maximum impact.

    • But that impact may have been undercut by leaks of some of the committee's most explosive material.

    By the numbers: The hearing last week nearly doubled the TV audience of the first three games of the ongoing NBA Finals, which averaged nearly 12 million viewers on ABC, per Nielsen.

    • Major Trump-era hearings also drew high engagement compared to other national TV events. The final games of the 2021 World Series and the NBA finals drew 11.7 million and 9.91 million viewers, respectively, while the Brett Kavanaugh and James Comey hearings drew around 20 million viewers each.
    • The Academy Awards, Grammys, Emmys and Golden Globes all drew fewer than 10 million viewers in 2021. Even the Olympics opening ceremonies drew just 15.1 and 14 million viewers in 2020 and 2021, respectively.

    The latest: Most major news and broadcast networks took Monday's hearing live on Monday morning, including Fox News, which didn't carry them live last week. (It instead carried them live on its sister network Fox Business.)

    • Still, it's unlikely those broadcasts drew the same level of engagement as the highly anticipated primetime event last week. Ratings for Monday's hearing are due out later on Tuesday.

    Extra: Ratings slump for second Jan. 6 hearing as around 10 million tune in
    Last edited by S Landreth; 16-06-2022 at 06:54 AM.

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    Confederate flag-toting man, son convicted in Capitol riot

    A federal judge on Wednesday convicted a Confederate flag-toting man and his son of charges that they stormed the U.S. Capitol together to obstruct Congress from certifying President Joe Biden’s 2020 electoral victory.

    U.S. District Judge Trevor McFadden delivered the verdict from the bench after hearing two days of testimony without a jury for the trial of Delaware residents Kevin Seefried and his adult son, Hunter.

    McFadden convicted both Kevin and Hunter Seefried of a felony count: obstruction of an official proceeding, the joint session of Congress for certifying the Electoral College vote on Jan. 6, 2021.

    The judge also convicted both men of misdemeanor charges that they engaged in disorderly conduct and illegally demonstrated inside the building. But he acquitted Hunter Seefried of other misdemeanor charges for clearing a shard of glass from a broken window at the Capitol.

    Both men will remain free pending separate sentencing hearings in September.

    McFadden, whom President Donald Trump nominated in 2017, presided over two previous bench trials for Capitol riot defendants. He acquitted one of all charges and partially acquitted another.

    Widely published photographs showed Kevin Seefried carrying a Confederate battle flag inside the Capitol after he and Hunter Seefried, then 22, entered the building through a broken window.

    McFadden rejected the defense argument that Kevin Seefried never intended to interfere with the congressional proceedings.

    “I find that he knew what he was doing,” McFadden said.

    The judge described Kevin Seefreid as the “prime mover” in their decision to go to Washington on Jan. 6. McFadden said Hunter Seefried’s guilty on the obstruction charge was a “closer question,” but the judge ultimately concluded that the son engaged in “aggravated conduct” that supported a conviction.

    “Hunter Seefried showed a pattern of deception and minimization of his actions” when an FBI agent interviewed him after the riot, McFadden said.

    FBI agents said they didn’t find any evidence linking Kevin Seefried or his son to any far-right extremist groups. Kevin Seefried told an agent that he didn’t view the Confederate flag as a symbol of racist hate.

    The Seefrieds’ trial included the first public testimony of Capitol Police officer Eugene Goodman, who has been lauded for his bravery during the Jan. 6, 2021, attack by a mob of Trump supporters. Goodman led a group of rioters away from the Senate chamber as senators and then-Vice President Mike Pence were being evacuated. He also directed Sen. Mitt Romney, R-Utah, to turn around and head away from the mob.

    Goodman encountered Kevin Seefried before the mob chased the officer up a set of stairs, a harrowing episode captured on video. The officer said the elder Seefried cursed at him and jabbed at him with the base end of his flagpole three or four times without making contact with him.

    Another Capitol police officer who confronted the mob near the Senate chamber recalled that Kevin Seefried asked, “Why are you protecting them?”

    “I assumed he was talking about Congress,” Officer Brian Morgan testified.

    The Seefrieds weren’t charged with assaulting any officers.

    Neither defendant testified at their trial.

    The father and son traveled to Washington from their home in Laurel, Delaware, to hear Trump’s speech at the “Stop the Steal” rally on Jan. 6. They were among the first rioters to approach the building near the Senate Wing Door, according to prosecutors.

    After watching other rioters use a police shield and a wooden plank to break a window, Hunter Seefried used a gloved fist to clear a shard of glass in one of the broken windowpanes, prosecutors said. But the judge found that two other rioters had destroyed the window before Seefried cleared the shard.

    McFadden convicted the Seefrieds of four misdemeanor charges: entering or remaining in a restricted building or grounds, disorderly or disruptive conduct in a restricted building or grounds, disorderly or disruptive conduct in a Capitol building or grounds, and parading, demonstrating or picketing in a Capitol building.

    The judge acquitted Hunter Seefried of three other misdemeanor counts: destruction of government property, entering and remaining in a restricted building or grounds with physical violence against property, and acts of physical violence in the Capitol grounds or building.

    The Seefrieds, who waived their right to jury trial, were the first Capitol riot defendants to get a bench trial on a felony charge.

    In April, McFadden acquitted New Mexico resident Matthew Martin of misdemeanor charges that he illegally entered the Capitol and engaged in disorderly conduct after he walked into the building.

    In March, McFadden acquitted a New Mexico elected official, Couy Griffin, of engaging in disorderly conduct but convicted him of illegally entering restricted Capitol grounds.

    McFadden has criticized prosecutors’ handling of Capitol riot cases. He suggested that the Justice Department has been unjustly tougher on Capitol riot defendants compared with people arrested at protests against police brutality and racial injustice after George Floyd’s 2020 murder by a Minneapolis police officer.

    More than 800 people have been charged with federal crimes related to the Jan. 6 attack. Juries have unanimously convicted five Capitol riot defendants of all charges. More than 300 other defendants have pleaded guilty to riot offenses, mostly misdemeanors. Approximately 100 others have trial dates in 2022 or 2023.

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