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  1. #1076
    Guest Member S Landreth's Avatar
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    Seattle Man Sentenced to 46 Months in Prison for Assaulting Law Enforcement During Capitol Breach

    A Washington State man was sentenced today to 46 months in prison for assaulting law enforcement during the breach of the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6, which disrupted a joint session of the U.S. Congress that was in the process of ascertaining and counting the electoral votes related to the presidential election.

    According to court documents, Devlyn Thompson, 28, of Seattle, was among individuals in a crowd on the Lower West Terrace of the Capitol who were pushing against and assaulting Metropolitan Police Department (MPD) and U.S. Capitol Police (USCP) officers in the tunnel leading into the U.S. Capitol. Thompson and others in the tunnel yelled obscenities at police and encouraged the continued assault. Thompson was part of a group that threw objects and projectiles at the officers, including flag poles, and grabbed and stole the officers’ riot shields to prevent them from defending themselves against the violence.

    At approximately 2:21 p.m., Thompson personally observed police order rioters to stop, physically push the crowd back, and deploy pepper spray in an effort to try to stop the ongoing assault. Later, Thompson entered a tunnel on the West Front Terrace that led to an entrance to the U.S. Capitol, where members of Congress were sheltering in place. Thompson joined rioters in that tunnel and assisted other rioters in their assault of officers by helping them seize and use stolen law enforcement shields for approximately 13 minutes. Thompson also helped throw a large speaker at the front line of officers, and he later picked up a metal baton from the floor of the tunnel and swung it overhead and downward against the police line in an apparent effort to knock a can of pepper spray from an officer’s hand and stop the officer from pepper-spraying the rioters. After more pepper spray was deployed by the rioters and the officers, Thompson retreated from the archway area.

    Thompson pleaded guilty on Aug. 6, in the District of Columbia, to assaulting, resisting or impeding officers while using a dangerous weapon. Thompson was arrested on that same date and has been in custody ever since. Judge Royce C. Lamberth also ordered him today to pay $2,000 in restitution. He also must serve a period of three years of supervised release following completion of his prison term.
    Keep your friends close and your enemies closer.

  2. #1077
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    Quote Originally Posted by S Landreth View Post
    Devlyn Thompson, 28, of Seattle
    That is a bit of a stretch. The trumpanzee is actually from Puyallup, a suburban white trash shithole about an hour and a half from more civilized people in Seattle.

  3. #1078
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    Justice Dept. forms new domestic terrorism unit to address growing threat

    The Justice Department is forming a new domestic terrorism unit to help combat a threat that has intensified dramatically in recent years, a top national security official said Tuesday.


    Matthew G. Olsen, the head of the Justice Department’s National Security Division, announced the unit in his opening remarks before the Senate Judiciary Committee, noting that the number of FBI investigations of suspected domestic violent extremists — those accused of planning or committing crimes in the name of domestic political goals — had more than doubled since the spring of 2020.


    Olsen said the Justice Department previously had counterterrorism attorneys who worked both domestic and international cases, and that the new unit would “augment our existing approach.”


    His testimony comes just a few days after the anniversary of the Jan. 6, 2021, riot at the Capitol, an event that some lawmakers say showed the FBI underestimated the threat posed by domestic extremists and violence-prone members of far-right groups.


    “This group of dedicated attorneys will focus on the domestic terrorism threat, helping to ensure that these cases are handled properly and effectively coordinated across the Department of Justice and across the country,” Olsen said.

    The hearing was convened to assess the threat of domestic terrorism a year after the Jan. 6 attack. It often devolved into partisan bickering over the riot that day, which involved hundreds of Trump supporters who marched to the Capitol after a rally outside the White House, and the violence and looting that erupted at some racial justice protests in 2020.


    Sen. Richard J. Durbin (D-Ill.) opened the hearing with a video showing footage and news coverage from the Jan. 6 riot, taking aim at Republicans for not being fully supportive of congressional efforts to investigate the attacks on police officers, threats against lawmakers and attempts to undo President Biden’s electoral victory.


    “They are normalizing the use of violence to achieve political goals,” Durbin said.


    Sen. Charles E. Grassley (R-Iowa) countered with a video showing unrest in Portland, Ore., and elsewhere. “These anti-police riots rocked our nation for seven full months, just like the Jan. 6 assault on the Capitol rocked the nation,” he said.


    Sen. Ted Cruz (R-Tex.) lambasted Olsen and Jill Sanborn, the head of the FBI’s national security branch, for failing to answer certain questions about Jan. 6-related criminal charges, and whether any FBI informants encouraged or participated in the violence.


    “Your answer to every damn question is ‘I don’t know, I don’t know, I don’t know,’ ” Cruz railed at Olsen. To Sanborn, he suggested that undercover FBI agents or informants may have spurred on the rioters — an assertion for which there is no known evidence but which Sanborn would not categorically rule out.


    “Ms. Sanborn, a lot of Americans are concerned that the federal government deliberately encouraged illegal violent conduct on Jan. 6,” Cruz said, asking her if that was true.


    “Not to my knowledge, sir,” she replied.

    She and Olsen sought to assure lawmakers that the Justice Department is investigating and prosecuting all of those who committed crimes, no matter what motivated them. Olsen said authorities had arrested and charged more than 725 people, including more than 325 facing felony counts, for their roles in the Jan. 6 attack.


    The FBI is seeking to identify and arrest more than 200 additional suspects.


    Sanborn said the bureau had opened more than 800 cases in connection with the riots during the summer of 2020, and arrested more than 250 people.


    The bureau assessed racially or ethnically motivated violent extremism and anti-government violent extremism as being the most “lethal” terrorism threats, Sanborn said. She added that the FBI had recently elevated anti-government violent extremism as a priority, on par with racially motivated violent extremism, homegrown violent extremism and extremism planned or inspired by the Islamic State.


    The breach of the Capitol on Jan. 6, 2021, has spurred new political and policy debates about failures of the FBI and other law enforcement agencies to prevent the attack, and how the government combats domestic terrorism.


    The Justice Department and the bureau have faced criticism in recent years for not focusing as intensely on domestic terrorism as they do internationally inspired threats, though officials have insisted they take both matters seriously.


    Last year, the White House released a national strategy to address the problem, calling for, among other things, new spending at the Justice Department and FBI to hire analysts, investigators and prosecutors.


    Historically, domestic terrorism investigations come with more procedural and legal hurdles than cases involving suspects inspired by groups based outside the United States, such as the Islamic State or al-Qaeda. The charge of material support for a foreign terrorist group, for instance, has no legal equivalent for someone eager to commit violence in the name of domestic political goals.


    As a result, domestic terrorism investigators frequently settle for filing gun or drug charges, and often those are filed in state — not federal — court, which can mask the overall extent of extremist threats.


    Democrats pressed Olsen to explain why prosecutors had not sought tougher sentences in Jan. 6 cases by seeking enhancements for terrorism. Olsen did not answer the question directly, saying each case had to be evaluated on its particular facts. He pointed to recent remarks from Attorney General Merrick Garland, who suggested such enhancements could come as prosecutors win convictions in more serious cases.


    Where precisely to draw lines about who is or who isn’t a domestic terrorist is also a subject of debate. At the hearing, Sanborn said that last year, there were four attacks conducted by domestic violent extremists, resulting in 13 deaths. She did not identify or describe the incidents, and FBI officials did not provide any details in response to questions from The Washington Post in the hours after the hearing.


    Federal law defines domestic terrorism as criminal acts within the United States that are dangerous to human life and which appear to be intended “to intimidate or coerce a civilian population … to influence the policy of a government by intimidation or coercion; or … to affect the conduct of a government by mass destruction, assassination, or kidnapping.”


    After the Jan. 6 attack, Democrats said the Justice Department and FBI did not aggressively pursue domestic terrorism cases during the Trump administration.


    From 2016 to 2019, the number of domestic terrorism suspects arrested per year fell from 229 to 107, before jumping to 180 in 2020. Since 2020, the number of open investigations has grown rapidly. FBI Director Christopher A. Wray has previously said that to handle the caseload, he more than tripled the number of agents and analysts working on domestic terrorism cases.


    At Tuesday’s hearing, conservative lawmakers pushed Olsen and Sanborn to explain and justify a memo Garland wrote last year urging more scrutiny of threats against school officials. Grassley said the memo had “a chilling effect on freedom of speech.”


    Both Olsen and Sanborn said the school-threats issue was a small part of their divisions’ work. Olsen said such matters were largely handled by other Justice Department components — including the Criminal Division and Civil Rights Division — while the national security division played an “advisory role.”


    Sanborn said the issue “is not a particular focus for the counterterrorism division,” adding that the FBI would only get involved if there is an allegation of a violation of federal law. She also sought to downplay the significance of the FBI’s efforts to track such cases by applying a particular record-keeping tag, saying that was “simply an administrative process to be able to better analyze trends.”

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/natio...430_story.html

  4. #1079
    Guest Member S Landreth's Avatar
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    Good to hear the effort to get these domestic terrorists charged is continuing.

    'seditious conspiracy'. I think a first




    Elmer Stewart Rhodes, founder of the far-right militia group the Oath Keepers, has been indicted and arrested over his organization's alleged involvement in planning the Jan. 6 attack.

    Rhodes, 56, is being charged for the first time in connection to events leading up to and on Jan. 6, according to a statement Thursday from the Justice Department. An additional 10 people, including nine others who already face separate charges in connection to the riot, were also indicted.

    Rhodes and the 10 other individuals were charged with "seditious conspiracy and other charges for crimes" related to the breach of the Capitol on Jan. 6, said the DOJ.

    The defendants conspired in a variety of ways, including organizing into teams that were "prepared and willing to use force and to transport firearms and ammunition into Washington, D.C.," the DOJ said, citing the indictment.

    More than 700 people have been charged with federal crimes related to the Capitol riot. As of late December, at least 165 had pleaded guilty.




    https://s3.documentcloud.org/documen...conspiracy.pdf
    Last edited by S Landreth; 14-01-2022 at 04:35 AM.

  5. #1080
    Guest Member S Landreth's Avatar
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    He faces a maximum of 60 years in prison

    First Jan. 6 attacker to go to trial guilty on all five counts

    Guy Reffitt, the first Jan. 6, 2021, Capitol rioter to take his case to trial, was found guilty Tuesday on all five counts against him.

    A jury found the Texas native guilty of attempting to obstruct the certification of the 2020 presidential election, transporting guns from Texas to D.C., bringing a firearm into restricted grounds of the Capitol, interfering with Capitol Police and threatening his son and daughter upon returning from the riot.

    Reffitt, a member of the militia group the Texas Three Percenters, traveled with a fellow member from Texas to Washington, D.C., carrying handguns and rifles.

    Both men brought guns to the Jan. 6 insurrection at the U.S. Capitol, where Reffitt took a video of himself saying “We’re taking the Capitol before the day is over.”

    Reffitt was outfitted in body armor and wearing flexi-cuffs.

    In a later recording, Reffitt said that though he didn’t go inside the Capitol building, “I started the fire.”

    The week-long trial against Reffitt included testimony from his son, Jackson Reffitt, who tipped off the FBI of his father’s plans before Jan. 6.

    Reffitt, who has been detained since his arrest on Jan. 16, 2021, will be sentenced June 8. He faces a maximum of 60 years in prison as well as financial penalties.

    More than 775 Capitol rioters have been arrested to date.

  6. #1081
    Thailand Expat panama hat's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by S Landreth View Post
    Reffitt, who has been detained since his arrest on Jan. 16, 2021, will be sentenced June 8. He faces a maximum of 60 years in prison as well as financial penalties.
    Even half of that will be a deterrent

  7. #1082
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    I hope the judge gives him the max. Pure scum, the lot of them. Treasonous seditionists who are the opposite of a patriot.

  8. #1083
    Guest Member S Landreth's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by panama hat View Post
    Even half of that will be a deterrent
    It would be but........

    Hopefully he remains behind bars until his kids are out of the house and well on their way (as in their 60’s or 70’s)

    His then-18-year-old son, Jackson Reffitt, had liberal political views and was troubled by what his father had done, so he began secretly recording his father. Within days, Guy Reffitt became paranoid about being arrested. Jackson Reffitt testified at the trial that his father told him and his younger teenage sister, "If you turn me in, you're a traitor. And traitors get shot." Jackson Reffitt turned over the recordings he made of his father to the FBI. Five days later, agents arrested Guy Reffitt.
    These kids might have another problem to deal with at home. Another fvckin’ batshit crazy parent

    At one point during the proceedings, he turned to his wife, Nicole Reffitt, who was sitting in the courtroom. They locked eyes, put their hands on their chests and nodded at one another.

    Nicole Reffitt spoke to reporters outside the courthouse soon after. She encouraged other Jan. 6 defendants, whom she referred to as "1/6ers," not to plead guilty.

    "Guy was used as an example to make all the 1/6ers take a plea," she said. "Do not take a plea, 1/6ers. Do not."

    She said that her husband would appeal the ruling and that "this fight has just begun."
    Last edited by S Landreth; 09-03-2022 at 06:18 PM.

  9. #1084
    Guest Member S Landreth's Avatar
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    Guilty : "Cowboys for Trump" founder Couy Griffin convicted in the second January 6 trial

    A federal judge found "Cowboys for Trump" leader Couy Griffin guilty of a misdemeanor charge connected to the Capitol attack, handing the Justice Department a victory in the second trial stemming from the insurrection on January 6, 2021.

    Judge Trevor McFadden handed down the verdict Tuesday after federal prosecutors presented video footage showing Griffin, a New Mexico county commissioner, climbing a bike ramp and ascending a makeshift plywood ramp on his approach to the Capitol.

    Griffin faces up to a year in prison on the misdemeanor charge of trespassing on restricted Capitol grounds. The judge set his sentencing for June 17.

    McFadden acquitted Griffin on a separate disorderly conduct charge, which also carried a maximum sentence of a year in prison.

    Griffin, 48, elected to have a judge — rather than a jury — review the evidence and decide his fate. The so-called bench trial featured testimony on Monday from a videographer who accompanied Griffin to Washington, DC, in early January 2021, along with a Capitol police inspector and Secret Service agent.

    Outside the courthouse, Griffin said he was "halfway pleased" with the verdict, and described the experience of standing trial in federal court as a "real honor."

    "I respect the decision that Judge McFadden made today, even though it wasn't the decision that I was really hoping and praying for. You have to continue to trust in our judges and our system. He found me guilty for crossing into a restricted area, and I was there on that day," Griffin said.

    Griffin stood by his decision to request a bench trial and said other January 6 defendants would have "to pray through it and make that decision as well.

    "If I was anywhere but Washington, DC, I would say go with a jury trial," Griffin said.

    "You're putting all your eggs in one basket, where on a jury trial you've got 12 baskets up there," he added.

    The Justice Department charged Griffin on January 16, 2021 — 10 days after the Capitol attack — with disorderly conduct and trespassing on restricted grounds. On Monday and in the lead-up to trial, Griffin argued that the Justice Department could not prove he was aware on January 6, 2021 that the grounds surrounding the Capitol were restricted.

    His defense lawyer, Nicholas Smith, also pressed an argument that the Capitol grounds were no longer restricted when Griffin entered because then-Vice President Mike Pence had been rushed away to safety amid the mayhem of January 6. Over the Justice Department's objection, McFadden allowed Smith to question a Secret Service agent about Pence's precise location.

    The strategy appeared to backfire against Griffin — and set the stage for a remarkable courtroom moment.

    On Monday, Secret Service inspector Lanelle Hawa confirmed that Pence fled the Senate chamber to a loading dock beneath the Capitol, where the former vice president stayed for several hours.

    The testimony marked the government's first public acknowledgment of Pence's whereabouts as a pro-Trump mob ransacked the Capitol on January 6, with some calling for the sitting president to be hanged. Hawa affirmed that the underground loading dock fell within the Secret Service protected zone around the Capitol on January 6.

    For Griffin, that testimony created a need to show that he was unaware that the area was off-limits when he approached the Capitol. His lawyer, Smith, used the questioning of Capitol Police Inspector John Erickson to show that temporary, plastic "snow fencing" was no longer upright when Griffin advanced toward the inauguration stage, and that the walls he scaled on January 6 lacked signage indicating the area was closed.

    But McFadden pointed to a video Griffin filmed outside the Capitol on January 5, 2021, with the snow fencing and signage behind him. The judge said Griffin saw the west front of the Capitol with "multiple rings" of snow fencing on January 5 and needed help from others, or a jerry-rigged ramp, to cross over "three different walls."

    "All of this would suggest to a normal person that perhaps you should not be entering the area," McFadden said.

    In her closing argument Tuesday morning, prosecutor Janani Iyengar said "any reasonable person" would have known that the area around the Capitol was closed to the public on January 6.

    "The defendant was entering an area knowing that area was restricted to the public, and he entered it anyway," she said.

    Iyengar put Griffin's conduct in the broader context of January 6, saying it jeopardized Pence's safety.

    "The mere presence of people in that restricted area created a security issue for the vice president. That's the reason the vice president had to evacuate," she said.

    At one point, McFadden pressed Iyengar about whether someone could be prosecuted for having to jump over the stone wall — a permanent fixture outside the Capitol – to retrieve a hat blown off their head.

    Iyengar stressed that Griffin didn't jump back over the fence but instead remained on the grounds and advanced toward the Capitol, eventually reaching the inauguration stage. Griffin, she said, used a metal bike rack as a ladder to climb over one of the stone walls outside the Capitol.

    On the disorderly conduct charge, Iyengar conceded that — if Griffin had simply walked through the area— "we would be having a very different conversation."

    "But that's not the scenario we're in with this defendant," Iyengar said, noting that Griffin spoke into a bullhorn, climbed over barricades, and encouraged others to be armed.

    Griffin's conviction came just weeks after a jury found Guy Reffitt, a member of the far-right Three Percenters militia, guilty in the first trial involving charges linked to the January 6 insurrection. The jury returned the verdict after just hours of deliberation, finding Reffitt guilty of all five charges he faced, including carrying a firearm on the Capitol grounds.

    Reffitt's trial featuredemotional testimony from his teenage son and from Capitol police officers who recalled their encounter with him on January 6. For the Justice Department, the conviction marked a significant first trial victory out of the nearly 800 cases that have stemmed from the Capitol attack.
    Last edited by S Landreth; 23-03-2022 at 06:43 AM.

  10. #1085
    Guest Member S Landreth's Avatar
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    Guilty: Jury quickly convicts Capitol rioter who blamed Trump for January 6. A judge ordered him behind bars before sentencing.

    A jury found Capitol rioter Dustin Thompson guilty Thursday on charges he obstructed a congressional proceeding and stole a coat tree from a Senate office on January 6, 2021, rejecting a defense argument that attempted to shift blame for the day's violence onto former President Donald Trump.

    After just a few hours of deliberations, the jury convicted Thompson, 38, on all six charges he faced in connection with January 6, including obstruction of an official proceeding, trespassing on restricted Capitol grounds, and theft of government property. On the obstruction charge alone, he faces a maximum sentence of 20 years in prison, but he's likely to receive a lighter punishment.

    Judge Reggie Walton ordered Thompson detained ahead of his July 20 sentencing, in a decision that appeared to surprise the now-convicted Capitol rioter and his defense lawyer. Walton raised concerns that Thompson posed a flight risk and said that, if released before his sentencing, Americans would wonder, "Why is he still walking free?"

    "The inevitable reality is that whether he does time now or does time later, he's got to do time," the judge said.

    Walton, a George W. Bush appointee to the federal trial court in Washington, DC, said Thompson "gleefully" took part in the Capitol attack and questioned his candor on the witness stand days earlier, calling his testimony "wholly disingenuous."

    "His conduct, in my view, was reprehensible," Walton said.

    As Walton spoke, Thompson put his head in his hands. Once Walton stepped down from the bench, Thompson turned over his belt and tie and was led out of the courtroom in handcuffs by a deputy US marshal.

    The judge also had harsh words for Trump, delivering a scathing condemnation in which he called the former president a "charlatan."

    "You know, I think our democracy is in trouble," Walton said. "Because unfortunately, we have charlatans like our former president, who doesn't in my view really care about democracy, but only about power. And as a result of that, it's tearing this country apart."

    In the 15 months since the January 6 attack, the Justice Department has charged nearly 800 alleged participants in the Capitol attack. The Justice Department won convictions in the two previous jury trials, one against a member of the far-right Three Percenters militia, the other against a former police officer.

    In a bench trial last week, however, a federal judge issued the first full acquittal in a January 6 case, finding New Mexico engineer Matthew Martin not guilty of four misdemeanor charges.

    Thompson's trial tested a defense strategy of connecting the mayhem of January 6 to Trump's incendiary rhetoric at a speech preceding the Capitol attack. During the trial, Thompson's defense lawyer declined to cross-examine several witnesses called by the Justice Department and at times sounded like a prosecutor, calling the Capitol attack "shameful."

    Rather than disputing the Justice Department's version of events, Shamansky asked jurors to consider Thompson's mindset on January 6 after months of unemployment and isolation amid the pandemic. Thompson took the stand in his own defense and testified that he felt he was following "presidential orders" on January 6.

    His wife, Sarah Thompson, also took the stand as part of his defense and recounted how he spent 2020 watching "conspiracy theory-type" videos online and came to believe the 2020 election had been stolen from Trump.

    Before the jury retreated for deliberations, Shamansky played a video of Trump's speech on January 6, in which he told a crowd of supporters: "We fight like hell. And if you don't fight like hell, you're not going to have a country anymore," he said.

    In his closing argument Thursday, Shamansky referred to Trump as a "gangster" who manipulated Thompson into a pawn in an assault on American democracy.

    "You had, frankly, a gangster who was in power," Shamansky said.

    Prosecutors alleged that Thompson traveled from Ohio to Washinton, DC, with a friend in January 6 to attend a Trump rally scheduled for January 6. After listening to Trump's speech, prosecutors said, Thompson and his friend Robert Lyon walked to the Capitol, where they became separated.

    Lyons was also charged in connection with January 6 and pleaded guilty weeks before Thompson's trial. In court, prosecutors displayed text messages between the two, including one from Thompson stating, "I'm taking our country back."

    In another message, Thompson's wife texted the two a screenshot of Trump's address urging the Capitol rioters to go home.

    "I will not post bail," she wrote.

    "Maybe don't send incriminating shit to my phone," Lyons replied, adding that his phone "might get warranted."

    Thompson entered the Capitol and reached the Senate parliamentarian's office, where he stole a coat tree and a bottle of liquor, prosecutors said. While en route to the Capitol, Thompson said he found a tactical vest by a garbage can and put it on.

    Prosecutors pointed to the vest as evidence that Thompson walked to the Capitol expecting violence. And, in the cross-examination of Thompson and closing arguments, prosecutors pushed back against Thompson's attempt to shift blame onto Trump.

    "President Trump did not hold his hand as he went to the Capitol to loot and defile the Senate parliamentarian's office," prosecutor William Dreher said.

  11. #1086
    Im bored AF Backspin's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bsnub View Post
    I hope the judge gives him the max. Pure scum, the lot of them. Treasonous seditionists who are the opposite of a patriot.
    Max would be far more than someone would get in China or Russia for similar transgressions

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    China death penalty crimes include rioting.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Backspin View Post
    Max would be far more than someone would get in China or Russia for similar transgressions
    Quote Originally Posted by Troy View Post
    China death penalty crimes include rioting.
    Backspit gets caught out
    every
    single
    time

    Good grief

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    Im bored AF Backspin's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by panama hat View Post
    Backspit gets caught out
    every
    single
    time

    Good grief
    And you are dumb enough to believe that

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    Right wing left wing
    you're all a bunch of cunts
    HEY!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Backspin View Post
    And you are dumb enough to believe that
    The hypocrisy of you calling anyone dumb is absolutely mind-boggling. You are clearly among the biggest idiots to ever grace this forum. Start a poll and include yourself, as you are guaranteed to win.

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    Thailand Expat panama hat's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Backspin View Post
    Max would be far more than someone would get in China or Russia for similar transgressions
    Quote Originally Posted by Troy View Post
    China death penalty crimes include rioting.
    Quote Originally Posted by panama hat View Post
    Backspit gets caught out
    every
    single
    time

    Good grief
    Quote Originally Posted by Backspin View Post
    And you are dumb enough to believe that

    China sentences three more to death over Xinjiang riots

    https://www.theguardian.com/world/2009/oct/15/china-sentences-death-urumqi-riots
    You're a fucking idiot

  18. #1093
    Hangin' Around cyrille's Avatar
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    Busted yet again, backspit.


  19. #1094
    Guest Member S Landreth's Avatar
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    Florida man gets 18 months in prison for threats to Pelosi, AOC

    A Florida man was sentenced Friday to a year and a half in federal prison for issuing a series of crude and violent threats to House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez.

    Paul Hoeffer, 60, of Palm Beach Gardens, received the sentence at a hearing in Fort Pierce, Fla., after pleading guilty to three felony counts of making interstate threats against Pelosi (D-Calif.), Ocasio-Cortez (D-N.Y.) and a prominent prosecutor in Chicago, Kim Foxx, court records show.

    Prosecutors had asked U.S. District Court Judge Aileen Cannon for a sentence of about 3½ years in prison for Hoeffer. His defense asked for leniency, noting that he was recently diagnosed with an aggressive form of cancer.

    Hoeffer admitted that in March 2019 he left a vulgar voice mail message at Pelosi’s office, threatening to cut her head off “Jihadist style” and warning her to “sleep with one eye open.”

    Hoeffer also conceded that around the same time he left a series of threatening messages for Foxx, who is Black, including a racial slur. “Bullets are going to rattle your fucking brain,” one message said.

    The messages to Pelosi in 2019 led the FBI to visit Hoeffer at his home and warn him not to make such calls to Congress, court papers say. He apologized and promised not to, according to court records.

    However, Hoeffer struck again in November 2020, calling Ocasio-Cortez’s New York office and leaving another threatening message. “I’ll rip your head off ... Keep one eye open when you sleep,” he said, according to court filings.

    U.S. Capitol Police officials have said threats against lawmakers have risen dramatically in recent years. In a report last May, police said threats were up 107 percent from a year earlier. Justice Department officials have also announced a crackdown against threats to public officials at all levels of government.

    ____________

    he was recently diagnosed with an aggressive form of cancer
    But the medical care will be for free (while in jail). Might not be the best,………but it’s free.

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    Guest Member S Landreth's Avatar
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    Jan. 6 rioter convicted after telling jurors he’s an ‘idiot’ who didn’t know Congress met at Capitol

    A New Jersey man with alleged Nazi sympathies who stormed the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6, 2021, tried and failed to convince a jury this week that he didn't know the Capitol building is where Congress meets.

    Timothy Hale-Cusanelli, who was in the U.S. Army Reserves when he stormed the Capitol, was convicted Friday on all five counts he faced, including a felony charge of obstruction of an official proceeding.

    Hale-Cusanelli, who has been in jail since Feb. 2021, did not dispute that he entered the Capitol on Jan. 6, and his defense lawyer explicitly admitted that Hale-Cusanelli engaged in criminal activity that day. Video shows Hale-Cusanelli yelling at cops outside the Capitol, entering the Capitol moments after it was breached, waving other members of the mob into the building, and attempting to grab another rioter away from police.

    But Hale-Cusanelli attempted to defend himself against charges by saying he didn't know that the Capitol was where the House and Senate sit — despite having described himself during the trial as a history buff who closely followed the electoral college certification process. He claimed in testimony on Thursday that he didn't realize that senators and House members were in the Capitol building on Jan. 6.

    "I know this sounds idiotic, but I'm from New Jersey," Hale-Cusanelli told jurors on Thursday. "I feel like an idiot, it sounds idiotic, and it is."

    The first count of Hale-Cusanelli's indictment charges that he "attempted to, and did, corruptly obstruct, influence, and impede an official proceeding, that is, a proceeding before Congress, specifically, Congress's certification of the Electoral College vote." Prosecutors had to convince a jury that Hale-Cusanelli acted "knowingly" and not "through ignorance, mistake, or accident."

    Hale-Cusanelli leaned heavily on the "ignorance" component, telling jurors that — despite his knowledge of the 17th Amendment that provided for direct election of U.S. senators — he had no clue that members of Congress met at the Capitol.

    "I didn't know the Capitol building was the same as the congressional building," Hale-Cusanelli told a federal prosecutor.

    Hale-Cusanelli was the fifth Jan. 6 defendant to face a jury trial. The first four defendants to face a jury — Guy Reffitt, Thomas Robertson, Dustin Thompson, and Thomas Webster — were convicted on every count they faced. Hale-Cusanelli's trial unfolded before Judge Trevor N. McFadden, a Trump-appointed judge who acquitted another Jan. 6 defendant during a non-jury trial.

    McFadden said Friday after the jury's verdict that he was open to giving Hale-Cusanelli a sentencing enhancement because he found the defendant's testimony "highly dubious.” Sentencing is set for Sept. 16.

    McFadden was the judge who ordered Hale-Cusanelli held until trial, in part based on evidence the prosecution provided illustrating racist comments he made. According to prosecutors, at least 34 of Hale-Cusanelli's colleagues told them that he held "extremist or radical views pertaining to the Jewish people, minorities, and women." A Navy petty officer claimed Hale-Cusanelli once said that "Hitler should have finished the job," prosecutors said. Prosecutors also discovered evidence on Hale-Cusanelli's phone they said shows he has Nazi sympathies and white supremacist views.

    And back in 2010, prosecutors said, Hale-Cusanelli was one of four people arrested for using a "potato gun" made out of PVC pipe and "emblazoned with the words ‘WHITE IS RIGHT’ and a drawing of a confederate flag" to shoot frozen corn at houses in Howell, New Jersey.

    Prosecutors also provided photographs where Hale-Cusanelli appeared to be dressed like Hitler. But jurors heard only some evidence of Hale-Cusanelli’s racist comments, including one text that proclaimed that Democrats would steal the election through "n****r rigging."

    They were not shown all of his texts because McFadden had ruled that including such comments would be prejudicial.

  21. #1096
    Thailand Expat panama hat's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by S Landreth View Post
    They were not shown all of his texts because McFadden had ruled that including such comments would be prejudicial.
    Yes, wouldn't want any prejudicial thoughts . . .

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    Minneapolis judge sentences 'Boogaloo' member to 4 years on terrorism charge

    A federal judge in Minneapolis on Wednesday sentenced another member of a far-right extremist group to prison on terrorism charges.

    Benjamin Ryan Teeter, 24, of Hampstead, N.C., got on the FBI's radar after he and Michael Robert Solomon, 32, of New Brighton, Minn., showed up with guns at protests in Minneapolis two years ago that followed the police murder of George Floyd.

    Teeter and Solomon were part of the Boogaloo Bois, a loose-knit organization that hopes to foment civil war in the U.S.

    The men each pleaded guilty to supporting a foreign terrorist organization after trying to sell weapons to a member of Hamas who turned out to be an FBI informant.

    U.S. District Judge Michael Davis sentenced Teeter to four years in prison. The sentence is a year more than he gave Solomon in March. But Davis said he'd consider reducing Teeter's sentence to three years if he follows through on his agreement to cooperate with prosecutors.

    Noting that the 48-month term is far less than other terrorism defendants he sentenced in recent years, Davis told Teeter that he got "one heck of a break."

    In April, Davis sentenced Ivan Harrison Hunter of Boerne, Tex., to 52 months for rioting after Hunter admitted firing 13 rounds from a semiautomatic rifle into the 3rd Precinct police station as the building burned.

    A fourth Boogaloo Bois defendant not charged in connection with the Floyd protests received a two-year sentence in January after pleading guilty to trying to sell machine gun parts to an informant.

    The FBI said Michael Paul Dahlager, 28, of St. Cloud, Minn., conducted surveillance of law enforcement ahead of a pro-Trump rally at the Minnesota Capitol after the 2020 election and had expressed a willingness to kill police.

  23. #1098
    Thailand Expat harrybarracuda's Avatar
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    Looking forward to this arsehole becoming someone's prison bitch



    The former head of the Proud Boys group has been charged with seditious conspiracy - scheming to overthrow the government - following the attack on the US Capitol.
    If convicted he could face a fine, up to 20 years in prison, or both.
    Far-right Proud Boys group's ex-boss faces up to 20 years in jail as he's charged with plotting to overthrow US government | US News | Sky News

  24. #1099
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    Quote Originally Posted by harrybarracuda View Post
    Looking forward to this arsehole becoming someone's prison bitch
    Who's bitch though? The Blacks or the Aryan Nations? A bit of a conundrum there.

  25. #1100
    Thailand Expat harrybarracuda's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by pickel View Post
    Who's bitch though? The Blacks or the Aryan Nations? A bit of a conundrum there.
    Doesn't matter, he's still coming out with an arse like Wookey Hole.

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