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  1. #51
    Thailand Expat misskit's Avatar
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    Top Republican torches LinkedIn for censoring Americans at the request of China

    EXCLUSIVE — A top Republican has become the first member of Congress to call out LinkedIn, the only major American social media platform that operates in China, for censoring American users on behalf of the ruling Communist Party.


    Rep. Jim Banks, chairman of the conservative Republican Study Committee in Congress, sent a letter Friday to Microsoft-owned LinkedIn, criticizing them for bowing down to the Chinese government by blocking the profiles of Americans who refer to the Asian superpower in a critical fashion.


    There are at least 100 Americans whose LinkedIn profiles have anecdotally been found to have been banned by China in the past few months for allegedly anti-China content in the "Education" or "Experience" sections of their LinkedIn profiles.

    MORE Top Republican torches LinkedIn for censoring Americans at the request of China

  2. #52
    Thailand Expat misskit's Avatar
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    China clamps down on pop culture in bid to ‘control’ youth

    BEIJING: From reality TV to online gaming and even pop fandom, China’s leadership has launched a crackdown on youth culture in what experts say is a bid to ramp up “ideological control”.

    In a series of sweeping measures, Beijing has moved to check what it considers the excesses of modern entertainment, and urged social media platforms to promote patriotic content.


    Authorities say they are targeting unhealthy values and “abnormal aesthetics”, but the moves are a bid to check outside influences and snuff any resistance to the Communist Party, analysts say.


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    The changes represent a “very concerted effort at ramping up of ideological control,” Cara Wallis, a scholar of media studies at Texas A&M University, told AFP.


    Colourful and often outlandish entertainment formats have mushroomed in China over the past decade, including boot camp-style talent TV shows inspired by Japanese and Korean pop culture and celebrity gossip.


    Along the way, it has also become the largest video games market in the world.


    Regulators - alarmed by what they see as decadence and degenerate morals - want to rein in the entertainment and gaming industries.


    They have made an example out of movie stars that allegedly stepped out of line, banned reality talent shows and ordered broadcasters to stop featuring “sissy” men and “vulgar influencers”.


    They have also imposed daily limits on the time children spend on video games.


    Authorities are threatened by the allure of entertainment obsessions that “allow an alternative to exist to the (Communist) Party providing spiritual or ideological guidance” for Chinese youth, Steve Tsang, director of the SOAS China Institute, told AFP.


    ‘Spineless cowards’


    As tensions have mounted with the West, China has also pushed a nationalist and militaristic narrative at home, including a vision of tough masculinity as seen in blockbuster action films such as “Wolf Warrior”.


    President Xi Jinping warned young Communist Party officials this month that they should “never be spineless cowards”.


    Regulators and state media have expressed anxiety about what they see as unsavoury foreign influences on young Chinese men.


    The party-run Global Times tabloid last week suggested the East Asian trend of “effeminate” male celebrities has roots in a CIA plot to weaken Japanese men after World War II.


    “There is fear for the future prosperity of the nation, which is associated with the quality of the younger generation,” said Altman Peng, a researcher of media and gender at Newcastle University.


    And as Beijing encourages more births to battle a looming population crisis, Peng told AFP these measures are also an effort to show prospective parents that it is “safe for them to raise their children” in China.




    The quality of youth, the Party has determined, is being threatened by the entertainment and culture consumed by China’s youth.


    Controlling what China’s youth see, hear and read has long been the policy, with strict internet censorship and crackdowns in recent years on men wearing earrings, tattoos or “vulgar” hip hop lyrics.


    Now, this control is being expanded to what young Chinese play too.


    Regulators have ordered China’s top gaming firms to rein in “unhealthy tendencies”, and hundreds of firms have vowed as a result not to publish content that promotes “money worship” or is “politically harmful”.


    The Party is pushing a very different role model for children - President Xi himself, whose political thought was introduced this term to primary school students.


    ‘My own ability to judge’


    Analysts said Beijing’s actions are also driven by a desire to rein in what it perceives as problematic social trends emerging from decades of runaway economic growth and rampant consumerism.


    Tech firms were forced in August to limit children’s online gaming time to just three hours a week during school terms as concerns grew about the youth spending too long hunched over screens.


    Pop superfans - or stans - have become the latest target in the crackdown.


    China’s cyberspace authority in June blamed fan groups for “adversely affecting the physical and mental health of minors”, pointing to the extravagant spending by fans in support of their idols.


    Those hit by these measures include Chinese fans of South Korean superstars BTS, after one group crowdfunded special livery on a passenger jet to mark the birthday of a band member.


    But young Chinese are getting around the new rules, including buying adults’ gaming accounts to skirt curfews.


    And some, such as 21-year-old celebrity reality show fan Su, see the rules as excessive.


    “I’m already an adult and have my own ability to judge,” she said, giving only her surname.


    “This kind of one-size-fits-all regulation isn’t conducive to the development of diversity.”

    China clamps down on pop culture in bid to ‘control’ youth

  3. #53
    Thailand Expat misskit's Avatar
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    Actress Gong Li renouncing Singapore citizenship amid China's 'blacklist'

    TAIPEI (Taiwan News) — Actress Gong Li (鞏俐) appears to be in the process of renouncing her Singaporean citizenship amid a blacklist designed to punish Chinese celebrities who obtained a foreign passport.


    In late August, the name and likeness of Chinese actress Zhao Wei (趙薇, Vicky Zhao) were suddenly scrubbed from Chinese online streaming sites and social media pages. In early September, rumors began to swirl on Chinese social media that seven famous Chinese actors with foreign citizenship had been placed on a “reorganization list” by the National Radio and Television Administration.


    The list allegedly at first included Nicholas Tse (謝霆鋒), Jet Li (李連傑), Zhang Tielin (張鐵林), Crystal Liu Yifei (劉亦菲), Will Pan (潘瑋柏), Wang Lee Hom (王力宏), and Mark Chao (趙又廷). Li has Singaporean citizenship; Zhang is a British citizen; Liu, Pan, and Wang have American citizenship; and Chao and Tse have Canadian citizenship.


    On Friday, SET News reported that Gong too is said to be renouncing her Singapore citizenship after her name was added to the rumored blacklist. Rumors that a "nationality restriction order" has been handed down to Chinese celebrities spread rapidly on Chinese social media.


    Some Chinese netizens cynically felt that she was only changing her citizenship due to pressure from the government, with comments such as "You used to ignore it, but now you can't afford it" and "You obtained foreign citizenship to enter Hollywood, now that you're washed up, you come back."


    Many others on China's heavily censored social media platforms praised her for being "patriotic" and asked her to "just come home." Singaporeans chastised Gong for simply using the country as a "stepping stone" while contributing nothing to the nation, according to The Straits Times.


    In 1996, Gong married Singaporean tycoon Ooi Hoe Seong (黃和祥) and obtained citizenship in 2008. At the time, she faced scathing criticism from Chinese fans for "forgetting her ancestors."


    Gong responded by saying, "It is natural to change one's citizenship because of family relations. I didn't think much about it. We are all descendants of the Yellow Emperor."


    However, she divorced Ooi one year later, did not try to reapply for Chinese citizenship and has reportedly used her Singaporean passport since. She was later quoted as saying that the renunciation of Chinese citizenship was a personal choice and at the time she "did not understand anything, let alone what 'nationality' means" and emphasized that there was "no need to explain too much to others," per Mirror Media.


    The same year that she divorced Ooi, she married French electronic musician Jean-Michel Jarre and moved to France, where she continues to reside. Gong is best known for her roles in "Red Sorghum," "Raise the Red Lantern," "Farewell My Concubine," and "To Live."

    Actress Gong Li renouncing Singapore citizenship amid China's 'blacklist' | Taiwan News | 2021-10-25 1800

  4. #54
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    I don't blame her or Jackie Chan that much for it. It is a huge fan base. I guess in the end it is up to their conscience.

    I have thought that the ban against effeminate men in the entertainment industry is silly. Beijing Opera has always used men to play women. I wonder what the motivation is behind it. It is like some sort of weird conservatism. I have never heard the basis for the crackdown. Is it to be anti LGBTQ+? Is it so that China seems more masculine? To be truly conservative would be to let happen because it is part of the traditional culture.

  5. #55
    Thailand Expat harrybarracuda's Avatar
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    Warning: Be cautious if you are a fragile pink


    a “reorganization list”


    They love these silly fucking names, don't they?


  6. #56
    Chinese spy sabang's Avatar
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    In spite of Uncle Xi's remonstrations, femmales are still alive and well in Shanghai


  7. #57
    Thailand Expat panama hat's Avatar
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    Warning: Be cautious if you are a fragile pink (*tm Harry)



    Quote Originally Posted by TTraveler View Post
    Is it so that China seems more masculine?
    This seems most likely . . . but no, no reasons given that I remember

  8. #58
    still dealing with idioms
    Hugh Cow's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Latindancer View Post
    Attachment 75596

    He was a WEIGHT CHALLENGED but active PERSON WITH LEARNNG CHALLENGES, a mass of ALTERNATIVE enthusiasms -- one of those completely unquestioning, WITH NON SPECIFIC WORK ETHIC on whom, more even than on the WOKE Police, the stability of the Party depended.

    George Orwell...Nineteen Eighty Four
    Updated to 21st century engsoc new speak.

  9. #59
    Thailand Expat misskit's Avatar
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    China LGBT rights group shuts down in tightening environment

    A LGBT advocacy group in China that has spearheaded many of the country’s legal cases pushing for greater rights is halting its work for the foreseeable future.


    LGBT Rights Advocacy China announced it was ceasing all activities and shutting down its social media accounts in an announcement on social media Thursday.


    “We are deeply regretful to tell everyone, Queer Advocacy Online will stop all of our work indefinitely,” the group said on WeChat, using the name of its social media account. It closed its accounts on WeChat and Weibo, two widely used platforms in China.

    A member confirmed that all the group’s activities have been shut down. The member, who spoke to The Associated Press on condition of anonymity because of safety concerns, declined to say why. Group founder Peng Yanzi did not respond to a request for comment.


    LGBT Rights Advocacy China did work across the country, pushing for the rights of gay people and raising awareness about the community. It advocated for same-sex marriage and fought workplace discrimination by helping individuals sue their former employers.


    The group helped a young woman sue textbook publishers for writing that homosexuality was a disorder. She lost the case in February, after years of litigation.


    Homosexuality is not a crime in China, and in bigger cities, there’s a vibrant social scene where LGBT individuals can socialize without much fear or discrimination. However, it appears that restrictions on advocacy groups and online censorship has grown, those in the LGBT community say.


    In July, WeChat shut down dozens of accounts run by university students and non-profit groups on LGBT topics.


    One LGBT blogger, who declined to be named out of fear of retribution, said it’s getting increasingly difficult to run an LGBT group in the current environment, noting that WeChat and other social media platforms are deleting related content.


    Shanghai Pride canceled its annual event in 2020 and said it would no longer hold it without explanation after 11 years of operation.


    “The future may bring more uncertainties, we await the day when we can lift the clouds and see the daylight,” the group said in a post.

    China LGBT rights group shuts down in tightening environment | Taiwan News | 2021-11-05 17:53:00

  10. #60
    Thailand Expat misskit's Avatar
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    China bars celebrities from showing off wealth and 'extravagant pleasure' on social media, saying pop stars must comply with 'core socialist values'

    Celebrities in China can no longer "show off wealth" or "extravagant pleasure" on social media, the Cyberspace Administration of China announced Tuesday.


    Both celebrity and fan-club accounts must "follow public order and good customs, adhere to correct public opinion orientation and value orientation, promote socialist core values, and maintain a healthy style and taste," China's internet-regulation agency said in a statement.


    The announcement follows the Chinese Communist Party's crackdown on the country's growing entertainment industry as officials push back against celebrity scandals and online fan groups it says cause social disorder.

    Tuesday's notice also prohibits celebrities from spreading rumors, publishing false or private information, provoking fan groups to "verbally attack each other," and encouraging fans to partake in "illegal fundraising or irrational investment."


    On the same day, the China Association of Performing Arts barred 88 people from livestreaming, including the Chinese Canadian pop star Kris Wu, who was recently accused of sexual assault.


    The group said the list was designed to "strengthen industry self-discipline" and "prevent illegal and unethical artists" from reentering the industry.


    In August, China's entertainment regulator deleted the presence of Zhao Wei, one of the country's most popular actresses, from all social-media and streaming platforms. While officials did not provide a reason behind Zhao's removal, state-backed media cited "various scandals over the years," such as a $7.45 million investor lawsuit.


    To enforce the new rules, Chinese social networks must monitor and report "suspected illegal and criminal acts of exposed stars, and group conflicts involving fans" to the authorities, while moderating content that may prompt social disorder, the notice said.


    Access to global apps such as Twitter, Facebook, and YouTube is blocked in China, so users rely on domestic sites subject to censorship, such as Weibo, Renren, and Youku.


    China recently faced scrutiny after the tennis star Peng Shuai accused a former senior member of the Chinese Communist Party of sexual assault in a post on Weibo, which was later removed. She remained unseen for nearly a month until Sunday, when she talked to the International Olympic Committee over a video call.


    "Peng Shuai, and all women, deserve to be heard, not censored. Her accusation about the conduct of a former Chinese leader involving a sexual assault must be treated with the utmost seriousness," Women's Tennis Association Chairman and CEO Steve Simon said in a statement. "We expect this issue to be handled properly, meaning the allegations must be investigated fully, fairly, transparently and without censorship."

    China Bars Celebs From Showing Off Wealth on Social Media

  11. #61
    Thailand Expat harrybarracuda's Avatar
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    "We expect this issue to be handled properly, meaning the allegations must be investigated fully, fairly, transparently and without censorship."
    You have to wonder why the chinkies wouldn't do that.

    Although not for too long.

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