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  1. #7451
    Thailand Expat harrybarracuda's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sabang View Post
    How touching, but Voltaire networks HQ is in Orleans, France.
    About Voltaire Network
    The author, Guy Mettan, is a Swiss MP and journalist-
    Guy Mettan - Wikipedia

    Tres exotique, but where did you get the Lebanese connection from?
    Christ what a gormless fucking twat.

    Absolutely clueless.


  2. #7452
    Chinese spy sabang's Avatar
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    That's not a nice thing to say about a new poster, just because he got his facts wrong. Grow up.

  3. #7453
    Im bored AF Backspin's Avatar
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  4. #7454
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    Quote Originally Posted by russellsimpson View Post
    you gentlemen start thinking about how this fucking thing will end.
    Two opinions of a possible outcomes, plus one review of their results, so far:

    How to Lose Big in Ukraine

    By Michael Brendan Dougherty

    June 24, 2022 6:30 AM

    Are we going to lose a second U.S.-funded army in two years?

    "Back in 2015 at the Munich Security Conference, Senator Lindsey Graham argued for aggressively arming Ukraine in what was perhaps the least inspiring fashion imaginable. “I don’t know how this will end if you give [Ukraine] defensive capability,” he explained, “but I know this: I will feel better because when my nation was needed to stand up to the garbage and to stand by freedom, I stood by freedom. . . . They [the Ukrainians] may die, they may lose, but I’ll tell you what . . . if somebody doesn’t push back better, we’re all gonna lose.”

    For nearly eight years now, I’ve made one simple argument over and over and over and over again:

    We should not get too involved in Ukraine, because in the end Russia will expend more political will, take more risks, and suffer more consequences to determine the final outcome there. In short, Ukraine is peripheral to us, and dear to them. So, in the meantime, our politicians and policy-makers should not put their own, and their nation’s, credibility on the line there. These high-flown promises were, I wrote, “the credit-default swaps of national security, a moral hazard that jeopardizes more than our retirement plans.”"

    " the foreign-policy blob fantasized that, with further investments from the United States and Europe, Putin would not only be defeated entirely in Ukraine, but NATO was reinvigorated, and that, ultimately, Putin would lose power in Russia.

    When we started sending arms, Ukraine was said to have just 6,000 combat-ready troops. By the time the war started, Robert Zubrin marveled at Ukraine for having the largest armed forces in Europe, 450,000 active-duty servicemen."

    And in three months Russia has done in Ukraine what the Pentagon could not do in Afghanistan over two decades: settle on a reasonable set of goals and develop an effective strategy for annihilating its opponents.

    Even after Western powers unveiled the mother of all sanctions, Vladimir Putin is giving major public addresses confidently predicting that Russia will get through it, and announcing that the sanctions, like most Western sanctions, were failing to achieve their political objective of humbling Russia, while at the same time they were extracting a significant price for Westerners themselves. And by the way, revenues to the Russian state were surging because of high oil prices.
    Meanwhile, according to a report at the Washington Post, the White House and foreign-policy blob has no idea how to extricate itself from this conflict with its honor or credibility intact.

    We are going to face a global recession and see food shortages throughout the third world, in part because it would be awkward to tell the Ukrainians that we aren’t going to support them to the point where they could recapture not just the Donbas but Crimea as well.

    Here’s a telling excerpt:

    Ivo Daalder, a former U.S. ambassador to NATO who now heads the Chicago Council on Global Affairs, said the battlefield impasse leaves the United States with a stark choice: either continue to help Ukraine sustain a potentially bloody status quo, with the devastating global consequences that entails; or halt support and permit Moscow to prevail.


    “That would mean feeding Ukraine to the wolves,” Daalder said, referring to a withdrawal of support. “And no one is prepared to do that.”

    A senior State Department official, who spoke on the condition of anonymity to describe ongoing international deliberations, said Biden administration officials had discussed the possibility of a protracted conflict with global spillover effects even before February, as U.S. intelligence suggested Putin was preparing to invade.

    The Biden administration hopes that the new weaponry, in addition to successive waves of sanctions and Russia’s diplomatic isolation, will make a difference in an eventual negotiated conclusion to the war, potentially diminishing Putin’s willingness to keep up the fight, the official said.

    This mismatch is quite clear. Consistent with the theory that Russia ultimately cares more about this conflict, it is acting vigorously to achieve an acceptable end. Meanwhile, the United States, unable to rally the deep passions of the American people to take significant risks in this conflict, must satisfy itself with hoping that more of the same failed strategy will yield a marginally less humiliating outcome.

    Our policy-makers in the executive branch and across the blob of NGOs are cut off from the people whom the Constitution authorizes to declare war through their elected representatives. Cut off this way, these policy elites have involved American honor, treasure, and credibility in a conflict the American people are unwilling to take charge of themselves and end victoriously.

    One risk of making your rivals’ wars more costly is that you just might make their eventual victory even larger.

    If the Ukrainian army fails to make a crucial strategic retreat, and is broken in the cauldrons of the Donbas, the United States will have made Russia’s victory much costlier, but also much more significant than it otherwise would have been.

    Putin will be able to claim he defeated not just the nationalists in Ukraine, but the Western powers that funded and trained their army from 6,000 to nearly half a million men.

    After the humiliation in Afghanistan, it would be the second massive U.S.-funded and trained army to be defeated in the space of two years.

    That is the real risk we are taking. And it’s not one that is going to leave NATO “reinvigorated” in the end. More like panicked and on the run. That is what I meant by becoming “pot-committed” in Ukraine. By so proudly and loudly raising the stakes, Western policy influencers such as Ivo Daalder now face impossible choices that “no one is prepared” to make.

    Is it a good thing for NATO to have two American-funded, NATO-supported armies destroyed in two years?


    In the end, the policy-makers will try to blame the American people for the policy failures they authored because they were incapable of thinking more than two steps ahead. They’ve already started. Skeptics like me were slimed as people who ultimately sympathized with Putin and who saw strongmen as vigorous and democracies as weak. This was a lie. I believe nothing is so fearful as a democracy that has truly gone to war.

    But our people have not gone to war. Only a policy elite has done that, using money they borrowed from us.

    In fact it is worse than a lie — it’s projection. It is the foolish hawks who have said that this “is a contest not just of armies but of societal wills” between democracies and authoritarianism. And now they are retreating into decadent fantasy.

    Casey Michel now writes that to “avoid more senseless bloodshed” (the bloodshed his last idea failed to avoid), the West must “decolonize Russia” — that is, break up the Russian federation into perhaps more than a dozen different ethnically divided republics.

    Do we really think the American people are anxious to study up on, fund, or bleed for the Tuvan People’s Republic? Has Adam Kingzinger started rehearsing the line, “We are all Mordovians now”? Will we blow trumpets for Komi sovereignty over Syktyvkar?

    Well, our policy elite is hoping to save its failure of deterrence in Ukraine by casting us in such fantasies.
    At least these dreams make Lindsey Graham feel better. "

    https://www.nationalreview.com/2022/...tm_term=second

    A similar opinion here:

    Avoiding a Russian Quagmire, the Improbable Ukrainian Peace, and the Risk of Direct Russo-NATO War


    by Gordon M. HahnJune 30, 2022

    https://gordonhahn.com/2022/06/30/av...usso-nato-war/

    Then there is the Russian review of it's current military progress.

    Meeting with Defence Minister Sergei Shoigu

    July 4, 2022 13:30
    The Kremlin, Moscow

    Meeting with Defence Minister Sergei Shoigu.

    "Defence Minister Sergei Shoigu:

    "Comrade Supreme Commander-in-Chief,

    Since June 19, formations and units of the Centre Group under the command of Colonel General Alexander Lapin, in co-operation with units of the Second People's Militia Corps of the Lugansk People's Republic and supported by the southern group of forces led by Army General Sergei Surovikin, have successfully carried out an offensive operation to liberate the Lugansk People's Republic.

    Within two weeks, they encircled and destroyed the groups in the Gorskoye cauldron, around Lisichansk and Severodonetsk. Twenty-five localities have been taken under control, the largest of which are Severodonetsk, Zolotoye, Gorskoye and Volcheyarovka. The operation ended yesterday with the liberation of Lisichansk, one of the largest towns in the Lugansk People's Republic. A total of 670 square kilometres of territory were taken under control during the active offensive.

    The total losses of the Ukrainian armed forces amounted to 5,469 personnel, including 2,218 killed and 3,251 wounded; 196 tanks and other armoured vehicles, 12 aircraft, one helicopter, 69 drones, six long-range surface-to-air missile systems, 97 multiple rocket launchers, 166 field and mortar artillery pieces and 216 vehicles of various purposes.

    When retreating from Lisichansk, the enemy abandoned 39 tanks and other armoured vehicles, 11 guns and mortars, 48 Javelins and NLAW anti-tank missile systems, 18 Stinger systems, and three unmanned aerial vehicles.

    Today the demining of the city of Lisichansk and its environs is underway, as is the delivery of humanitarian cargo, as well as the provision of medical assistance to civilians.

    The Russian Armed Forces are continuing the special military operation.

    President of Russia Vladimir Putin:

    Good. Thank you.

    As you know, Colonel General Alexander Lapin and Army General Sergei Surovikin also reported to me today on the progress in fulfilling their tasks and presented their proposals for the development of offensive operations. Both the Defence Ministry and the General Staff are considering the proposals of the field commanders.

    The units that took part in active combat operations and achieved success and victories in the Lugansk direction, of course, should rest and build up their combat capabilities. Other military formations, including the East Group and the West Group, must carry out their tasks according to the previously approved plans, according to the single scheme, and I hope that everything will happen in their directions in the same way as it has happened in Lugansk.

    I agree with your proposal to award Commander of the Centre Group Colonel General Lapin and Deputy Commander of the 8th Army of the Southern Military District Major General Abachev the title of Hero of Russia. The corresponding Presidential Executive Order will be signed today.

    I would also ask you to recommend for state decorations all military personnel who distinguished themselves in the course of these combat operations. Based on your daily reports, I know that the Russian army has many such brave, professional soldiers, daring – in a good way – warriors, and they should all be honoured with corresponding state decorations of their Motherland.

    My congratulations and words of gratitude also go to the soldiers of the 2nd Army Corps of the LPR People's Militia. I know that they worked actively and competently, too, and showed courage and heroism in the truest sense of the word, when liberating their native land.

    I congratulate all of you and wish you further success."

    http://en.kremlin.ru/events/president/news/68815
    Last edited by OhOh; 05-07-2022 at 05:38 PM.
    A tray full of GOLD is not worth a moment in time.

  5. #7455
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    Clearly, you missed the article I posted above. I will link it again...

    https://teakdoor.com/world-news/2093...ml#post4409322 (Russia launches Ukraine invasion)

    You like sab are just posting the same crap over and over. There are some big surprises for you stooges in the coming days and weeks.

  6. #7456
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    HIMARS are a true precision weapon, unlike the crap Russian "cruise" missiles. Some drunk, inept Russian officer got smashed in his bed...



  7. #7457
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    Quote Originally Posted by bsnub View Post
    Clearly, you missed the article I posted above
    Your article you suggest I read, I did.

    Unfortunately, as your article which demands, one recognises a "bad Russia against poor little Ukraine" event. It fails to include NATO and the EU's involvement. Both of which one could suggest are super-powers. NaGaStan militarily and both manufacturing.

    Whereas, my post above indicates that some do accept factually that NATO and the EU have decided to provide a non-NATO and a non EU country with endless support since 2014.

    I accept that the latter is obvious to most. Not you and your article. I suspect Mr. Henry Kissinger has more knowledge and experience in this area, than you or your article's author.

    Thus, your article is of no use in understanding the current Russian SMO.

    Quote Originally Posted by Norton View Post
    That's nice. Makes invasion justified.
    Ask those, NATO that split Yugoslavia.

    The two Ukraine areas legally ceded themselves from Ukraine early this year as determined by their citizens. After NATO and two EU countries failed to deliver the MINSK agreement, as agreed in a UNSC resolution. As many parts of other countries have done historically, some recognised by many countries, others by a small number.

    Russia acknowledged their sovereignty, which has occurred previously in other countries.

    The two new countries requested assistance, which Russia agreed to and continues to provide.

    Currently, Russia and the two sovereign countries are consolidating their borders with Ukraine to protect their sovereign land from military attack from Ukraine, NATO and mercenaries from afar. The extent of the two current sovereign countries and possible further portions of Ukraine are yet to be determined.

  8. #7458
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    Who’s winning now on planet Bsnub?

  9. #7459
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    double post
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Ukraine war mega thread-ukrmap20220621-jpg   Ukraine war mega thread-ukrmap20220705-jpg  
    Last edited by OhOh; 05-07-2022 at 09:28 PM.

  10. #7460
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    Some maps and opiions indicating Russia and allies progress in their SMO:

    'Western' Media Spread Copium To Prolong The War In Ukraine


    'June 21 map of the Lysichansk cauldron as it was developing.

    The frontline extended over 125+ kilometers (78 miles).


    Ukraine war mega thread-ukrmap20220621-jpg



    Fourteen days later, July 4th, and the map looks like this:


    Ukraine war mega thread-ukrmap20220705-jpg


    The frontline has been shortened to 25 kilometer (15 miles).

    On Sunday the Russia Defense Ministry announced that it troops had 'liberated' 184 square kilometer over the last 24 hours.

    When I was in the military my tank battalion was expected to operate on a generally five kilometer (3 miles) wide frontline. That was of course just a rule of thumb depending on the terrain and other circumstances. But we can expect that a Russian Battalion Tactical Group (BTC) has similar abilities of frontline coverage.

    Russia needed some 25 BTCs to cover the frontline on June 21. It now needs only 5 BTC to cover the current line. There were and now are of course additional reserve troops and some BTC are rotated out as rested ones come in just as Russia's president has ordered them to do.

    It's much better to capitulate now instead of waiting for the Chechen leader Ramsan Kadyrov to come to Kiev and make him do so."


    A twitter video link:

    https://twitter.com/i/status/1544122725173760002

    MoA - 'Western' Media Spread Copium To Prolong The War In Ukraine

  11. #7461
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    Quote Originally Posted by Iceman123 View Post
    Who’s winning now on planet Bsnub?
    Unfortunately, his planet is being bombarded with Russian asteroids.

    NaGaStan

    Attachment 89087

















    having cancelled all coms, expected reconnection is scheduled for June 2033, according to yesterdays announcement from his whitehouse spokeperxxx.

  12. #7462
    Thailand Expat misskit's Avatar
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    Russians Fear Commanders Are Selling Their Own Troops’ Locations for Cash

    A Russian colonel was accused of selling information on the whereabouts of his own men to foreign intelligence agencies by concerned Russians, according to Ukrainian authorities.


    An audio recording of what the Ukrainian Defense Ministry’s Main Intelligence Directorate says is an intercepted phone call appears to suggest the colonel was not the first who was accused of selling out his own troops. The call, released Monday, includes a conversation between a man identified as a Russian soldier and a female acquaintance. No details were provided on where the soldier was based in Ukraine, but he can be heard in the recording complaining of constant shelling.


    The conversation then takes an interesting turn when the unnamed woman notes that a squadron of the “31st Brigade” was given up by their own Russian colonel, apparently referring to the 31st Guards Air Assault Brigade.


    “The airborne troops taken captive?” the man asks.


    “Yes, yes, 76 people were taken,” she says, adding that “they were sold out by their own” and naming a “Colonel Matkovsky” for the betrayal.


    “There have already been many such instances,” the man responds, noting that “they leak information” about the troops.


    “It’s true, it’s true. I later spoke with a FSBishnik [an agent of Russia’s Federal Security Service] … and he said yes, it’s all true. They found 17 million in his account,” she said.

    The woman went on to say she hadn’t asked for clarification on what currency the money was found in, before appearing to suggest the Russian colonel had been paid by American intelligence agencies.


    “It’s understandable, the stinking U.S. is suffering. They have hunger, cold,” she said.


    Ukrainian intelligence did not say when the phone call was said to have taken place, or provide any further information on the fate of the Russian colonel or troops mentioned in the conversation.


    But the 31st Guards Air Assault Brigade, one of Russia’s most elite airborne units, suffered heavy losses in a Russian offensive outside Kyiv in late February and early March, and several Russian troops were said to have been captured at that time.


    The General Staff of the Armed Forces of Ukraine also said in early April that 25 members of the brigade had refused to fight any further in Ukraine.


    U.S. intelligence has not publicly confirmed that any Russian commanders have handed over intel on troop movements in Ukraine, but the CIA did launch a very public campaign in May to solicit information from Russians regarding the war.


    The agency published Russian-language instructions on social media urging wannabe informants to make “virtual contact” using the Tor Internet browser. Those who make contact are then vetted to determine if they truly have “information of interest” to U.S. spies.

    Russians Fear Commanders Are Selling Their Own Troops’ Locations for Cash

  13. #7463
    Thailand Expat misskit's Avatar
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    Wagner Group Is Sending Russian Inmates to Fight in Ukraine, Report Says


    More than 130 days into Vladimir Putin’s “special military operation” against Ukraine, Russia’s Defense Ministry is apparently counting on prison inmates and shipyard workers to serve as fresh cannon fodder.

    The desperate new recruiting drive has been reported in St. Petersburg, where the families of inmates at two prisons say the Wagner Group—a private Russian military force that has been tied to the Kremlin—is offering prisoners money and a get-out-of-jail-free card to go “search for Nazis” in Ukraine, according to the independent Russian news outlet iStories.


    “They told my relative, ‘It’s very hard to find the Nazis there, and they are very well-prepared. You will be at the forefront in helping to detect Nazis, so not everyone will return.’ At first they said about 20 percent would come back. Then that ‘almost nobody will return.’ Those who survive are promised 200,000 rubles and amnesty. And if someone dies, they promise to pay their family 5 million rubles. This is all only in words, nothing is fixed on paper,” an unnamed relative of one of the inmates told the outlet.


    At least 40 inmates signed up to join the war at that prison, the relative said. The inmates, after being urged to “defend the motherland,” were reportedly told it would look like they were being transferred but they’d be dropped off at the border with Ukraine.


    “Wagner is recruiting people. No one is hiding that, the [prison foremen] are saying that directly,” the inmate’s relative said.

    Family members of another inmate who agreed to join the war told iStories he’d done so because he genuinely believed he’d have his conviction expunged and be free upon his return. But it seems the recruiters aren’t really expecting any of the inmates to make it back alive: Relatives of an inmate at a separate prison said the men were told they’d be sent into the war without any identification documents.


    Workers at two St. Petersburg shipyards managed by the state-owned United Shipbuilding Corporation and sanctioned oligarch Alisher Usmanov’s Metalloinvest have also reportedly been targeted as part of a recruiting drive by Russia’s Defense Ministry.


    The Moscow Times’ Russian service reported Tuesday that workers at the Admiralty and the Baltic shipyards were offered contracts with monthly salaries of 300,000 rubles ($5,300) to go fight in Ukraine.


    “They offered it to those with good experience, age has nothing to do with it. For example, they gave a call-up notice to one older employee who went through the Second Chechen War,” one of the employees told the Times.


    Workers at Lebedinsky mining and processing works in Belgorod, owned by Usmanov’s Metalloinvest, described similar efforts, though the company has denied that.

    MSN

  14. #7464
    Thailand Expat russellsimpson's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by misskit View Post
    is offering prisoners money and a get-out-of-jail-free card to go “search for Nazis” in Ukraine, according to the independent Russian news outlet iStories.
    Hilarious if it wasn't so damn sad.

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    All stories highly suspect.


  16. #7466
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    Quote Originally Posted by misskit View Post
    More than 130 days into Vladimir Putin’s “special military operation” against Ukraine, Russia’s Defense Ministry is apparently counting on prison inmates and shipyard workers to serve as fresh cannon fodder.
    I guess its fair to say that low life's fight this war and only "LOW LIFE'S" cheer for Putler.

  17. #7467
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    Russian Ruble Drops 17% Amid Falling Exports, Rumored Intervention


    The Russian ruble extended a recent slump Thursday, declining 17% against the U.S. dollar in 48 hours to reach its lowest level since late May.


    The ruble hit 64.5 against the greenback during morning trading on the Moscow Exchange as the Russian authorities apparently intervened in currency markets to stop the ruble from strengthening and energy exports to Europe declined.


    “They are coordinating to buy currencies of ‘more friendly countries’ such as [Chinese] yuan to artificially depress the exchange rate,” analyst Nick Trickett told The Moscow Times.


    After a currency collapse when the Kremlin ordered troops into Ukraine in February, the ruble strengthened dramatically as a result of falling imports and a raft of currency controls imposed by the authorities. But officials have been warning that the strength of the ruble — which neared 50 against the U.S. dollar last week — could be harmful to the Russian economy as it dents Russia’s income from selling commodities abroad.

    Finance Minister Anton Siluanov said last week that the government was considering intervention on the currency markets to ease upside pressure on the ruble.


    Falling volumes of Russian energy exports are also believed to be pushing the ruble to weaken. “[Lower gas sales to Europe] would mean a decrease in export earnings and, as a result, a decrease in foreign currency sales on the market,” the chief economist at Alfa Bank, Natalia Orlova, told independent media outlet The Bell on Tuesday.


    Exports are expected to fall even further next week amid a planned 10-day closure of the Nord Stream gas pipeline.


    While the strengthening of the ruble since the invasion — making it the world’s best-performing currency — was touted by some Russian officials as a sign that the economy had shrugged off Western sanctions, the exchange rate was beginning to cause problems.


    A one-ruble growth in the value of the Russian currency equates to the loss of up to 200 billion rubles ($3 billion) in government revenue, Siluanov told a meeting of Russia’s Union of Industrialists and Entrepreneurs last week.


    “That means a 10 ruble change in the currency exchange rate equates to more than 3 trillion rubles [in losses]. That’s quite a volume,” RBC business daily cited Siluanov as saying.


    In addition to boosting revenue, the government also apparently hopes a weaker ruble will stimulate manufacturers to produce substitutes for imported goods no longer available because of Western sanctions and the exit of Western companies from the Russian market.


    “When the currency is strong — at least on paper — it means imports are cheap. To increase domestic production, [the government] would prefer a weak ruble,” Trickett said.


    But economists are divided over whether the ruble will continue declining — the direction apparently favored by the government.

    “I can see it settling back in a range more akin to what it was prior to the invasion or maybe a little bit higher, between mid 70 to low 80 [against the U.S. dollar],” said Trickett.

    Russian Ruble Drops 17% Amid Falling Exports, Rumored Intervention
    - The Moscow Times

  18. #7468
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    Quote Originally Posted by misskit View Post
    “The Moscow Times’ Russian service reported Tuesday that workers at the Admiralty and the Baltic shipyards were offered contracts with monthly salaries of 300,000 rubles ($5,300) to go fight in Ukraine.

    They offered it to those with good experience, age has nothing to do with it. For example, they gave a call-up notice to one older employee who went through the Second Chechen War,

    Workers at two St. Petersburg shipyards managed by the state-owned United Shipbuilding Corporation and sanctioned oligarch Alisher Usmanov’s Metalloinvest have also reportedly been targeted as part of a recruiting drive by Russia’s Defense Ministry.”
    Experienced soldiers, who have a better chance of surviving, are choosing themselves, to go or not.

    Rather than untrained, inexperienced, teenage males and females, which Ukraine is forcing to fight.

    Quote Originally Posted by misskit View Post
    Russian Ruble Drops 17%
    Due to:

    Quote Originally Posted by misskit View Post
    Russian authorities apparently intervened in currency markets to stop the ruble from strengthening and energy exports to Europe declined.
    The Russian Central Bank female boss has delivered better than the NaGaStan and vassals financial gurus, so far.


  19. #7469
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    Quote Originally Posted by misskit View Post
    what the Ukrainian Defense Ministry’s Main Intelligence Directorate says is an intercepted phone call
    Quote Originally Posted by misskit View Post
    Russians Fear Commanders Are Selling Their Own Troops’ Locations for Cash
    Quote Originally Posted by misskit View Post
    U.S. intelligence has not publicly confirmed that any Russian commanders have handed over intel on troop movements in Ukraine, but the CIA did launch a very public campaign in May to solicit information from Russians regarding the war.

    The agency published Russian-language instructions on social media urging wannabe informants to make “virtual contact” using the Tor Internet browser. Those who make contact are then vetted to determine if they truly have “information of interest” to U.S. spies.
    Rather short on any evidence, don't you think?

  20. #7470
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    Quote Originally Posted by OhOh View Post
    Rather short on any evidence, don't you think?

    Says the bloke for whom "evidence" is the witless opinions of the idiots that write the blogs he slavishly follows.

  21. #7471
    Thailand Expat harrybarracuda's Avatar
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    For Assad, you forgot "Wouldn't have lasted a month if Putin hadn't bombed the shit out of the country for him and started his list of war crimes".

    And

    KYIV, July 7 (Reuters) - Two U.S. senators seeking to pass a law designating Russia as a "state sponsor of terrorism" visited Ukraine’s capital on Thursday to discuss the bill with President Volodymyr Zelenskiy.
    Republican Lindsey Graham told Reuters in a joint interview with Democrat Richard Blumenthal that the bill would put Russia in "the category of Iran, Syria and North Korea."
    You cheerlead all those c u n t s anyway so it won't matter to you.
    Last edited by harrybarracuda; 08-07-2022 at 02:13 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by harrybarracuda View Post
    For Assad, you forgot "Wouldn't have lasted a month if Putin hadn't bombed the shit out of the country for him and started his list of war crimes".
    Assad also did not battle NATO what a crock of shit. The entire pic is just more of his utter horseshit. Three Stooges being morons as usual.

  23. #7473
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    Ka-Boom!


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    Ukraine forces finally seeing impact of western arms

    Ukrainian forces are finally seeing the impact of western weapons on the frontlines of the war with Russia, Volodymyr Zelenskiy has said.

    Experts say while western equipment has been crucial for pushing back Russian forces, the west will need to scale up its supplies, and even mobilise its own defence industries, if it wants to avoid a war of attrition that Ukraine could lose.

    During his nightly TV address, Zelenskiy said that thanks to western supplies, Ukrainian forces were advancing in two directions in the Kherson and Zaporizhzhia regions on Ukraine’s southern front and dealing blows to Russia by hitting some of its logistics warehouses.

    “Finally, [Ukraine] feels that western artillery is working very powerfully,” he said, adding that it had “inflicted very noticeable blows on warehouses and other points that are important for [Russia’s] logistics.” He said the Ukrainian strikes had “significantly reduced the offensive potential of the Russian army”.

    Vladimir Putin hit back, saying that if the west wanted to defeat Russia on the battlefield, it was welcome to try.

    In televised remarks to parliamentary leaders, the Russian president said: “Today we hear that they want to defeat us on the battlefield. What can you say, let them try. We have heard many times that the west wants to fight us to the last Ukrainian. This is a tragedy for the Ukrainian people, but it seems that everything is heading towards this.”

    Ukrainian forces published a video of what they said was a successful strike on a Russian ammunition warehouse in occupied eastern Ukraine. They did not reveal the exact location.

    “The first type of equipment that the west supplied to Ukraine was the equipment that did not have complex supply-chain issues,” said Jack Watling, a senior research fellow at the Royal United Services Institute, referring to equipment Ukrainians would not need training on or need spare parts for.

    He said that since the initial emergency supplies, Ukraine had asked its allies for any equipment they were willing to give. Western governments then provided equipment “piecemeal”, he said, “what they have available and what they think [they] can hand over without denuding their own forces too much”.

    The result is that Ukraine has a wide range of equipment pieces that require their own ammunition, spare parts and training processes, said Watling. This has created some short-term problems for Ukraine’s command and, along with the logistics of getting the equipment to Ukraine’s front, has caused delays and low availability.

    “What we’ve seen in the past few weeks is a recognition from countries that there needs to be more systemic support, so we’ve seen countries deliver more of systems that they’ve previously delivered as well as Himars,” said Watling, referring to US-supplied rocket launchers.

    “And this is making a tactical difference, but Ukraine still has to manage multiple supply chains, relatively small fleets of a lot of different systems, and the ammunition available is very limited.”

    Watling said Nato’s limited ammunition stocks meant the west would have to mobilise its own defence industry if it wanted to continue to support Ukraine’s military and avoid a protracted war of attrition.

    Serhiy Kuzan, the chair of the Ukrainian Security and Cooperation Center in Kyiv, said Ukraine had noticed a difference on the front from the moment the Himars and howitzers arrived. “It allows us to participate in what is an artillery duel,” he said. “And with the longer-range rockets we have destroyed over 20 warehouses of Russian artillery and it has slowed Russia’s offensive. They are having to be more careful.”

    Kuzan said that so far western supplies had not given Ukraine a watershed moment in the war, as Russia still had more artillery pieces and ammunition than Ukraine. “But now we are not just trying to survive their bombs and rockets but hit their warehouses. Russia uses so much artillery ammunition they need large supplies bases, so this has now become our main aim.”

    Ivan Sechin, a military expert and former Ukrainian and Soviet military intelligence official, said western weapons’ blows against Russian bases had worked to demoralise the Russian forces as much as destroy their logistics.

    In several videos published by the Ukrainian armed forces, Russian soldiers can be seen running from burning bases, which Sechin says would have shaken their conception of where they are safe.

    “It’s clear that it is having an effect because they are continuing to attack but not at the same rate as before,” said Sechin. “But with current supplies, Ukraine can only hold them and doesn’t have the ability to launch significant counteroffensives. The west are still worried about provoking Russia but they must see that the Russian army is not as powerful as we once thought. They are presenting their small wins [in the east] as a great victory.”

    Russian forces killed at least seven civilians and injured others in the last 24 hours throughout battle-scarred Donetsk, said the region’s governor, Pavlo Kyrylenko. Kramatorsk, Ukraine’s de-facto administrative centre in Donetsk, was struck by Russia on Thursday, Agence France-Presse said, killing at least one civilian and injuring several others.

    Though shelling continues in eastern Ukraine, the Institute for the Study of War, a Washington-based thinktank, said Moscow may be taking an “operational pause”.

    “Russian forces will likely confine themselves to relatively small-scale offensive actions as they attempt to set conditions for more significant offensive operations and rebuild the combat power needed to attempt those more ambitious undertakings,” the institute said.

    Russia’s defence ministry seemed to confirm that assessment in a statement on Thursday, saying its units were being given time to rest in order to “recover their combat capabilities”.

    https://www.theguardian.com/world/20...arms-zelenskiy

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    Good watch this...


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