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  1. #426
    Thailand Expat harrybarracuda's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by OhOh View Post
    But enjoy your day discussing a useless graph.
    We already established that the graph is useless because it doesn't differentiate between gifts, soft loans and hard loans.

    But we know from previous chinky form that the chinkies don't give anyway anything for free, there is always blackmail or bribery ahead and the consequences for the borrowing country are usually detrimental - with the exception of the "officials" that put their countries in the shit for personal gain.

  2. #427
    Hansum Man! panama hat's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by harrybarracuda View Post
    with the exception of the "officials" that put their countries in the shit for personal gain.
    Even President-for-Life is a billionaire . . . to which WahWah and Loondyke just respond with:
    Quote Originally Posted by harrybarracuda View Post
    Blah Blah Blah I have my fingers in my ears I can't hear you

  3. #428
    Your local I.Q. Monitor
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    It appears Its not all beer and skittles in China after banning Australian coal, according to the below report. I was not able to confirm the whole story through another news service but by all reports it is producing problems for the locals with power cuts and restriction on air conditioning, as well as prolonging higher iron ore prices which are still above the forecast price and predicted to stay there much longer before a price fall.
    Canada has increased its coking coal exports to China in the last quarter of 2020 which helps to fill the gap left by Australian coal. Thank you so much for your help Canada. Solidarity brother!

    China's trade war with Australia backfires as country is plagued my blackouts during cold winter | Daily Mail Online

  4. #429
    Thailand Expat tomcat's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hugh Cow View Post
    Thank you so much for your help Canada. Solidarity brother!
    ...Canada had nothing to do with Australia miring itself in a trade trap with China...Aussie elected government officials should have seen the growing imbalances, trade distortions and possible threats long ago and acted. I suspect they were overcome by the promise of eternal prosperity and the expected avalanche of grateful votes from a newly enriched electorate...the Chinese should be thanked for providing a timely and challenging lesson in realpolitik...
    Majestically enthroned amid the vulgar herd

  5. #430
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hugh Cow View Post
    Thank you so much for your help Canada. Solidarity brother!
    Hang in there, Trudeau will be gone soon. There are a lot of other countries that should have Australia's back in this fight as well though.

  6. #431
    Neo Cameralist Backspin's Avatar
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    Russian coal suppliers could boost their exports to China, as the world’s largest coal buyer is reportedly curbing shipments of the commodity from Australia amid escalating tensions between the two countries.

    The developer of the largest Russian coal deposit, Elga, announced on Tuesday that it created a joint venture with a Chinese shipping company to promote Russian coal on the massive Chinese market. The project between Elgaugol and GH-Shipping is set to satisfy China’s growing demand for high-quality coking coal.



    “The supplies of coking coal from Elga will replace a significant amount of Australian and American coal of similar quality,” Elgaugol Director-General Aleksandr Isaev said.
    Another Russian producer, Mechel, previously said that it was planning to increase exports of coal to China amid Beijing’s restrictions on Australian imports. In November, the shipments rose by 13 percent, and are set to jump by 25-30 percent in December, Mechel CEO Oleg Korzhov said as cited by Russian media.


    Tensions between the two countries have been growing for around three years, after the Australian government began limiting Chinese investments in the country. In 2018, Canberra added fuel to the fire when it banned China’s Huawei and ZTE from its 5G rollout. The most recent escalation occurred when Australia pushed in April for an international inquiry into the origins of the coronavirus outbreak.

  7. #432
    Hansum Man! panama hat's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Backspin View Post
    The most recent escalation occurred when Australia pushed in April for an international inquiry into the origins of the coronavirus outbreak.
    Egads, how dare they!!!!!


    Hang on . . . China has done several 'inquiries' as well . . . and blamed India, Italy, the US etc...

    Bunch of fucking wankers . . . is that why you identify, Skidmark?

  8. #433
    A Cockless Wonder
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    China's power supply is struggling as winter temperatures plunge. Is the ban on Australian coal to blame?

    In China, the prospect of resource scarcity is largely thought to be a thing of the past.
    Key points:

    Millions of people in central and eastern China have had power outages
    Authorities say this is party due to unseasonably cold weather and coal shortages
    This comes as China has significantly restricted Australian coal imports

    But this month, power outages have returned to some parts of the country, conjuring memories of China's old command economy, where resource rationing was a part of daily life.

    Chinese social media has seen tens of thousands of posts complaining about the new electricity restrictions in the country's central and eastern provinces of Hunan and Zhejiang, which have been viewed more than 150 million times on the platform Weibo.

    News of the restrictions comes amid a burgeoning trade spat between Australia and China, in which Australian coal appears to have effectively been barred from Chinese ports.

    By November, more than 60 vessels carrying Australian thermal coal were held up in Chinese waters because they weren't able to offload their cargo, according to Bloomberg shipping analysis data.

    So do China's recent energy woes have anything to do with its sanctions on Australia, or is it just an awkward coincidence?
    What's happened?
    You view a grainy mobile image of a high-rises with no lights at night, with only one light source on the horizon.
    Changsha, in Zhejiang province, suffered blackouts as a result of China's energy crunch this month.(Weibo)

    Residents of Hunan and Zhejiang have been issued notices stipulating the "orderly use of electricity", along with other power restrictions that haven't been seen for a long time, according to local media reports.

    The restrictions have come during a particularly cold Chinese winter, where millions of people have switched on energy-intensive heating to cope with sub-zero temperatures.

    Temperatures in Zhejiang plummet around this time of year, with daily average lows of 3 degrees Celsius in December in January, the mercury usually doesn't rise above 8 degrees.

    According to China's state-owned broadcaster CCTV, lights and lifts in some office buildings were shut off in a several cities across Hunan and Zhejiang.

    The power outages forced some office workers in Hunan's city of Changsha to climb 20 to 30 flights of stairs, according to a report in the local news publication iFeng.

    Social media users in the city of Yiwu in Zhejiang made similar complaints.

    "The office room is freezing cold after the aircon is turned off Now the lift is shut off," one resident wrote on Weibo.

    "[Climbing stairs] almost killed me this morning."

    Changsha residents have also been advised against using energy-intensive appliances such as electric stoves and ovens, and not to set air conditioners above 20 degrees.

    The ABC has also seen an online notice to a middle school in Zhejiang, banning staff and students from turning on heating if temperatures exceeded 3 degrees.
    Do we know what's causing the power pinch?
    You view large transmission power lines with a snowy hill of wind turbines on the horizon on an overcast day.
    A Hunan energy spokesperson says China's freezing temperatures are limiting wind energy production.(Reuters: Jason Lee)

    In Hunan, authorities said the province of more than 67 million people had reached the electricity grid's maximum load, with a predicted gap of 3 million to 4 million kilowatts of energy during winter's peak period, according to local media.

    "This year's situation is quite special. One is that winter comes earlier and the weather is relatively cold," a spokesperson for Changsha's Development and Reform Commission told China's Cover News this week.

    "Then our coal supply in Hunan Province is also insufficient. For various reasons, the power supply is now relatively tight."

    This was again stated by a spokesperson for the Changsha Power Supply Company, who said Hunan's power pinch was partly due to the cold, and partly due to a drop in energy production capacity.

    Wu Donglin said the latter comprised of "the reduction of coal burning, the decline of reservoir water levels, and the inability of wind power to generate electricity" because of freezing temperatures.
    The threat from within

    China has pledged to become carbon-neutral by 2060, responding to the need to drastically bring down its overwhelming share of global carbon emissions. Experts say it's also critical for the communist party's survival.
    Read more

    Mr Wu's comments came after an editorial published in the state-owned Global Times tabloid claimed Beijing was preparing to let power producers import coal from several countries without restrictions, "except for Australia".

    China's coal imports on the whole have been on a downward trajectory according to official Government statistics in other words, it's not just Australian coal that has been having trouble entering China's market.

    "In November, 11.67 million tonnes of coal were imported, a decrease of 2.06 million tonnes from the previous month, and a year-on-year decrease of 43.8 per cent," a statement from the National Bureau of Statistics read on Tuesday.

    "From January to November, 260 million tonnes of coal were imported, a year-on-year decrease of 10.8 per cent."

    While coal makes up the lion's share of China's energy mix, it has been on a minor downward trajectory in recent years as Beijing begins a transition to clean energy.
    So is the ban on Australian coal to blame?

    Shane Oliver, AMP Capital's chief economist, told the ABC it was quite possible that the power cuts had a link to the coal ban, but that it was impossible to know for sure.

    "The disruption to the supply of coal into China as a result of the bans on Australia may also be playing a role in that and causing rationing," he said.

    "It is quite normal to have cold winters at this time of the year in China, so one would assume that's been allowed for."
    Have we hit peak China?
    A windmill in the outback in front of clouds lit up red and orange by a sunset.

    As trade and political tensions simmer, speculation swirls about what's really going on between the two nations and what's next on a Chinese sanctions "hit list".
    Read more

    However he said it was premature to assume China's trade tactics against Australia had backfired.

    "I think all countries which engage in trade wars tend to pay some price for it," Dr Oliver said.

    "Trade wars are not desirable, they do result in both sides losing: obviously one side loses because they don't get the supply and quality of supply that they're used to, the other side loses because they lose an export market."

    Jun Mao, a thermal coal analyst at Jiangsu Jinying Capital Management, told the ABC the power shortages were a sign of supply and demand issues in China.

    "China's thermal coal stocks are insufficient and the price is relatively high. But it hasn't been completely out of control," he said.

    "The Chinese Government is already coordinating, and I think the problem will be resolved soon."
    Coal is loaded onto ships.
    One Chinese media personality said it was "nonsense" to connect the shortages to Beijing's Australia policy.(ABC Newcastle: Anthony Scully)

    Mr Mao said he believed the power shortages had "some connection" to China's ban on Australian thermal coal, but that it was "not the main reason".

    "It is also related to some domestic factors, which have impacted on the shortage of thermal coal," he said.

    Hu Xijin, editor of the Global Times, wrote on social media that it was "nonsense" to link China's power shortage to the ban on Australian coal.

    He said the ban had a "subtle impact" on China's electricity supply, because "the coal imported from Australia is mainly coking coal and China has rich resources of thermal coal".

    "The claim that the Australia policy hurts ourselves is a malicious fabrication by foreign forces and some people in our country," Mr Hu wrote.

    How much energy does China use?
    A shot of an active coal-fired power station near a residential area in China.
    Coal continues to be the mainstay of China's energy mix, despite pledging to become carbon neutral by 2060.(ABC News: Brant Cumming)

    To understand China's energy consumption, you have to understand that it's a paradox.

    While the country is the largest consumer and investor in renewable energy, it is also by far the largest consumer of coal on the planet.

    This makes it the world's largest emitter of greenhouse gases, while also being a renewables superpower committed to being carbon neutral by 2060.

    Australia V China-coal-jpg


    But coal is still largely responsible for keeping the lights on across China, where energy consumption has skyrocketed in recent years.

    Data from the International Energy Agency showed that in 2018, China consumed more than 6,800 terawatt hours of energy, which eclipsed the total energy consumption for all of North America in that year.

    On Wednesday, a spokesperson for China's National Development and Reform Commission said China's year-on-year electricity consumption increased by 9.4 per cent last month.
    How much Australian coal has China sanctioned?

    China isn't dependent on Australian coal for its energy that being said, Australian coal has been a part of China's energy mix for several decades now.

    Australian coal exports comprise two varieties: thermal coal, which is burnt for electricity, and metallurgical coal, which is used for making steel and iron ore.

    Last year, 18 per cent of all Australian thermal coal exports were sent to China, with a value of $4 billion, while total coal exports were worth $13.7 billion.
    A reclaimer places coal in stockpiles at the coal port in Newcastle, Australia
    Coal is one of many Australian exports that have been subject to Chinese sanctions.(Reuters: Daniel Munoz)

    The slowdown in Australian coal exports to China began to emerge in September, with ships carrying Australian coal barred from offloading their cargo at Chinese ports.

    This month, no ships carrying thermal coal from Newcastle Australia's busiest coal port have left for China, and none are scheduled to leave before Christmas.
    Ground to a halt

    Normally one in five coal ships leaving the Port of Newcastle are bound for China. The latest shipping schedule reveals that number is now zero.
    Read more

    As this trade appears to have been effectively cut off by China, it joins an ever-growing list of Chinese sanctions against Australian imports amid a worsening geopolitical stoush.

    Beijing laid some of its issues with Canberra officially in November, delivering a list of 14 "grievances" that noted Australia's "anti-China" government-funded research at the Australian Strategic Policy Institute (ASPI), "interference" in China's internal affairs regarding Hong Kong, Taiwan and Xinjiang, and ban of Huawei from the construction of Australia's 5G network.

    Alongside trade, Australian diplomats and ministers have had their contacts with Chinese officials frozen, and Australian calls for a dialogue with China have been left unanswered.

    https://www.abc. net.au/news/2020-12-18/china-electricity-power-shortage-hunan-zhejiang-australia-coal/12993418

  9. #434
    Thailand Expat tomcat's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Looper View Post
    Alongside trade, Australian diplomats and ministers have had their contacts with Chinese officials frozen, and Australian calls for a dialogue with China have been left unanswered.
    ...good: the ball to unfreeze is in China's court...better to leave things that way rather than give China the satisfaction of seeing Aussie politicians publicly moan and fret about lost business...also better to look for new markets to develop to cushion the loss...bullying should never be met with appeasement...

  10. #435
    Hansum Man! panama hat's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tomcat View Post
    ...good: the ball to unfreeze is in China's court...better to leave things that way rather than give China the satisfaction of seeing Aussie politicians publicly moan and fret about lost business...also better to look for new markets to develop to cushion the loss...bullying should never be met with appeasement...
    Agreed. It's all about 'face'.





    Quote Originally Posted by Looper View Post
    China's power supply is struggling as winter temperatures plunge. Is the ban on Australian coal to blame?
    They'd never admit it though unless by lying through their teeth that bad Australia had raised the price or similar, therefore harming the hard-working and innocent people of China - never again will Chia be subjugated by the nasty western powers etc etc etc etc

  11. #436
    A Cockless Wonder
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    Chinese investment in Australia plummets 61%

    Chinese investment in Australia plummeted 61% in 2020, the lowest number in six years.

    The drop in investment comes amid a growing diplomatic rift between the two countries.

    Australia V China-_117336425_gettyimages-549703525-jpg

    The Australian National University's Chinese Investment in Australia Database (CHIIA) recorded just over $780m (A$1bn ; 550m) in investment.

    Only 20 Chinese investments were recorded in 2020, well below the 2016 peak of 111.

    Last year's decline came on top of a 47% drop from 2019, when Chinese investment totalled $1.57bn.

    Who is the Australian TV anchor detained by China?
    Brits snap up Australian wine not going to China
    Australia to 'call in the umpire' on China trade hit

    Dr Shiro Armstrong, director of the East Asian Bureau of Economic Research, where CHIIA is based, said the decline in Chinese investment in Australia outpaced falling global foreign investment last year.

    "Foreign direct investment fell globally by 42% according to the United Nations (UN)," Dr Armstrong said in a media release. "UN data is measured differently, but the fall in Chinese investment to Australia was much larger."

    Chinese companies have invested across all sectors of Australia's economy in recent years, but last year they only bought into the real estate ($357m), mining ($321m) and manufacturing ($119m) sectors.

    The drop is at least partly due to Australia's investment settings during the Covid-19 pandemic.

    The government announced temporary measures in March that would subject every proposed investment to scrutiny by Australia's Foreign Investment Review Board (FIRB).

    Previously, a review only applied for "non-sensitive" transactions if the investment was worth $930m, or $213m for investors from countries without a free trade agreement with Australia.

    The aim was to prevent a fire sale of distressed Australian assets to foreign owners, but it also delayed investments as the FIRB dealt with a backlog, blowing out the review period from 30 days to six months.

    The Australian government also announced additional reforms to its foreign investment laws in July, which added a national security test and allowed the treasurer to cancel deals retrospectively.

    In August, the Treasurer Josh Frydenberg stopped the $600m sale of Japanese beverage giant Kirin's wholly-owned Australian subsidiary Lion Dairy and Drinks to China Mengniu Dairy.
    Trade tensions

    The latest figures come against a backdrop of increased diplomatic tensions tensions between Australia and China.

    Trade ties have been particularly strained since Australia first called for a rigorous investigation into the origins of the Covid-19 pandemic in April.

    Chinese investment in Australia plummets 61% - BBC News

  12. #437
    A Cockless Wonder
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    Chinese diplomat Wang Xining claims being a friend of China is seen as a 'sin' in Australia, hits out at Australian media reporting

    China's most high-profile diplomat in Australia has declared that those who are friendly to China will be cherished by their grandchildren, while those who "choose to make enemies" with Beijing will be "cast aside by history".

    Australia V China-463d5dca2ef6a937a49cc835cf41c53b-jpg

    Key points:

    Wang Xining portrayed China as a victim of biased Australian media reporting
    Mr Wang is the deputy head of the Chinese embassy in Australia
    In his speech, he also claimed an Australian WHO investigator was misquoted in media reporting

    Deputy Head of Mission Wang Xining's comments were made in a recent speech to the Australia China Business Council in Canberra and were published this week.

    He sought to portray China as a victim of biased Australian media reporting and "ridiculous suspicions" about China being a threat.

    "[If] people are immersed by those negative portraits of China by the major media outlets and brainwashed by the vulgarised and simplified political slogans, how would they understand China?" Mr Wang asked his audience, according to a copy of the speech published on the Chinese embassy's website.

    "It seems that being friendly to China, to be a friend of China, becomes a sin and mistake in Australia.

    "History will prove that it is wise and visionary to be China's friends, and your children and grandchildren would be proud of you."

    Mr Wang went on to tell the audience that those who "deliberately vilify China and sabotage the friendship … out of their sectoral or selfish interest will be cast aside in history".
    Wang Xining in a dining room, framed by other people.
    Wang Xining said it was becoming "really difficult to be China's friend in Australia".(

    ABC News: Nick Haggarty)
    'So pitiful' about WHO investigator

    The speech is the first major address by a Chinese embassy representative in Australia this year and comes after 12 months of deteriorating diplomatic ties.

    "This is sophisticated, albeit thinly veiled, CCP propaganda," Jeffrey Wilson from the USAsia Centre in Perth told the ABC.

    "By arguing there are 'friends' and 'enemies' of China within Australia, the speech deliberately attempts to stoke societal divisions.

    "It's really an extraordinary speech. I cannot think of a PRC diplomat ever giving something so nakedly 'splittist' before, anywhere."

    Mr Wang did not specifically touch on many of the fraught issues with Australia, such as China's trade strikes on at least seven different types of Australian exports or the federal government's blocking of some Chinese investment on national security grounds.

    He also did not mention the prolonged detention of two Australian nationals for state security investigations in Beijing, or specifically raise the Australian government's call for an independent inquiry into the origins of coronavirus, which previously prompted diplomatic anger from Beijing.

    But he did touch on the media coverage of the WHO investigation to Wuhan last month, saying he felt "so pitiful" for Dominic Dwyer, the only Australian member of the international expert term, claiming he was misquoted in media reporting.

    Mr Wang incorrectly claimed a first-hand piece written by Dr Dwyer for The Conversation was only reported in the Guardian — the ABC also published the piece — while he also questioned why "so few people believed" the claims of China-based British-Australian former policeman Jerry Grey.

    Mr Grey has been prominently featured in multiple state media reports for echoing Chinese government talking points and claiming he could not see evidence of mass internment centres for ethnic minority Uyghurs during bicycle rides through the far-western region.

    Despite criticising media coverage, Mr Wang also did not mention the Chinese government's targeting of Australian journalists for national security investigations last year in response to ASIO raids on Chinese state reporters in Sydney.

    https://www.abc .net.au/news/2021-03-02/wang-xining-hits-out-at-australian-media-in-speech/13208232


    Mr Wang looks a bit like a Bond villain.

    He should bring a bowler hat to these conferences and throw it boomerang style at rude Australian journalists that hurt the Chinese national feelings

  13. #438
    In Uranus
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    Quote Originally Posted by Looper View Post
    Chinese investment in Australia plummeted 61% in 2020, the lowest number in six years.
    That is a good thing.

  14. #439
    Thailand Expat harrybarracuda's Avatar
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    Exactly, it usually comes at a price.

  15. #440
    Hansum Man! panama hat's Avatar
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    'Investment' isn't necessarily a good thing as it also includes purchases of farms, factories, mineral rights etc... Industries that are viable and running and - therefore - of interest.

  16. #441
    Chinese spy
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    ^ That's what the Yellow shirts said.


    Chinese Australians discriminated against as Canberra-Beijing tensions boil over: Lowy report


    Almost one in five Chinese Australians say they have been physically threatened or attacked in the past year, with most blaming tensions stemming from the COVID-19 pandemic or hostility between Canberra and Beijing.
    Key points:


    • Many Chinese Australians told Lowy that prior to 2020 they felt Australian society becoming more welcoming
    • Chinese Australians are more trusting positive towards the Chinese government than other Australians
    • Almost half of those polled said they were concerned about the Chinese government's influence on Australian politics


    Around one in three community members also say they have faced verbal abuse or discriminatory treatment.

    But almost 70 per cent of Chinese Australians still say they feel accepted by Australian society, with almost eight in 10 saying Australia is a good place to live.
    The findings are part of a wide-ranging new survey of the Australian Chinese community conducted by the foreign affairs think tank the Lowy Institute.
    One of the authors of the survey, Natasha Kassam,said the survey showed how ordinary Chinese Australians had been hit by mounting political tensions and resentments.
    "As that broader Australian debate around China has shifted over the past year, particularly in relation to foreign interference and economic coercion, it does seem Chinese Australians have borne the brunt," she said.






    The results are particularly stark because many Chinese Australians told Lowy that before 2020, they felt Australian society was gradually become more welcoming to them.
    "They really do attribute this shift over the past year to the bilateral relationship and to the COVID-19 pandemic," Ms Kassam said.

    "Before that the trajectory they report is a positive one."
    Sydney mother Ping Hua, who's lived in Australia for five-and-a-half years, tells a similar story.
    Ms Hua said she feels "lucky" to be in Australia.
    When she had a serious car accident while living in Canberra she was impressed by the care she received in hospital, and from health workers sent to her home.
    She was also delighted by the way her neighbours and other members of her local community rallied to support her while she slowly recovered.




    "They showed me support, they helped me to get involved in local community hobby groups they understood I must have been bored, staying [at home] alone with crutches and a wheelchair," she said.
    "I realised that if this happened back in China in my hometown, I would probably need to hire more people for extra help, or need extra help from other family members."
    But Ms Hua said mounting bilateral hostilities between Australia and China had created tensions within the Chinese diaspora, as well as between Chinese Australians and the broader community.

    "I cannot avoid it anymore. Politics became my daily life. It's like, which side are you on? The Australian government side? The Chinese government side?" she said.

    "I feel even as a stay home at home mom, I have to be careful.
    "And I have no side! Oh my gosh, why do I have to take any side?"



    Australian media reporting on China 'too negative': survey

    The poll of more than 1,000 community members paints a complex picture of the experiences of Chinese Australians and their views towards Australia, China, democracy and contemporary geopolitics.
    In general, Chinese Australians are markedly more trusting positive towards China and the Chinese Government than other Australians.
    But Ms Kassamsaid there were still a wide range of views and stark disagreements within the community.
    For example, the Chinese Australian community is evenly split on the fraught question of foreign interference.



    Forty-six per cent of Chinese Australians were concerned about Beijing's influence, compared to 82 per cent of the Australian population.(ABC News: Jarrod Fankhauser)

    Almost half (46 per cent) of those polled said they were concerned about the Chinese government's influence on Australian politics.
    But an almost identical number of people said Australian media outlets and politicians paid too much attention to foreign interference.
    Half of those surveyed also said that Australian media reporting on China was "too negative."


    Ms Hua said she used to resent media reports criticising China before slowly realising that Australian outlets were also deeply critical of their own government's failings.
    But she still feels like Australian politicians and media organisations have focussed too heavily on aggressive statements from the Chinse government.

    "I do think it is too much recently. I feel like they use it as a weapon too much," she said.

    A complex mix of views towards policy

    The Lowy poll also revealed Chinese Australians have greater trust in China's government than most Australians.
    More than 70 per vent of those surveyed said they had at least some trust that China would "act responsibly in the world".
    In contrast, less than one in four people in the broader Australian community shared that trust.
    The Chinese-Australians polled were also much more open to Australian cooperation with China.




    Half of Chinese Australians polled said they "somewhat" trust China to act responsibly in the world.(ABC News: Jarrod Fankhauser)

    Sixty-five per cent of those surveyed indicated they disagreed with the Federal Government's decision to ban Chinese telco Huawei from the national broadband network, saying Australia should allow Chinese firms to provide technology for critical infrastructure.
    Seventy per cent said Australia should co-operate with China to roll out aid projects in the Asia-Pacific.
    But Ms Kassam said many Chinese Australians also said the federal government should hedge and put some limitson cooperation with Beijing.
    For example, 49 per cent of those polled said the Australian Government should restrict scientific research with China in defence and security fields.
    Sixty-five per cent said Australia should look for other markets to reduce its economic dependence on China, while 67 per cent said the government should sanction Chinese officials responsible for human rights abuses.


    "There is a real complexity of views there. There's more positivity to China on the one hand, but a high level of concern about human rights and economic dependence and coercion on the other," Ms Kassam said.
    Chinese Australians also have far more mixed views on democracy than most other Australians.
    Just over one third of those surveyed said democracy was preferable to any other system of government, compared to around 70 per cent of the broader Australian population.
    Forty-one per cent said that a non-democratic government can be preferable in some circumstances.



    Just over one third of Chinese Australians surveyed said democracy was preferable to any other system of government.(ABC News: Jarrod Fankhauser
    )Ms Kassam said Beijing's track record dealing effectively with the COVID-19 might have cemented that view in parts of the Chinese Australian community.
    Forty-three per cent of those surveyed view China's system of governance more favourably in the wake of the pandemic.

    "The past year has seen a really interesting debate emerge over whether authoritarian or democratic systems are better equipped to handle the pandemic," she said.

    "I think the failures of the United States and democratic backsliding around the world have not helped Australia's cause."
    The survey also confirms that Chinese-Australians remain heavily dependent on WeChat and Chinese media outlets for news.
    Eighty-four per cent of the people surveyed used WeChat for Chinese-language news, while 74 per cent read mainland news outlets, including state media sources like Xinhua.

    Chinese Australians discriminated against as Canberra-Beijing tensions boil over: Lowy report - ABC News

  17. #442
    Hansum Man! panama hat's Avatar
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    Thank you for your OhNo-Klondyle-esque cnp.

    Basically, the article shows that the CCP's heavy-handed approach has turned a few Australians into anti-Chinese bigots.

    No surprise there

    Will your next cnp be about the CCP's embassy staffers threatening those who don't toe the party line, mainly HKers and also PRCers? How the CCP and its representatives threaten educational institutions and their staff about writing or commenting on issues criticising China?

    Its not whatabout-ism like your mates love doing, it's simple cause and effect

  18. #443
    Chinese spy
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    Basically, the article shows that the Murdoch papers heavy-handed and bigoted approach has turned a few Australians into anti-Chinese bigots.
    Ftfy.

    Thank you for your Looper-esque cnp.
    Ditto.


    You really need to address your unhealthy obsession with everything Klondyke, PH. Everything ok?

  19. #444
    Your local I.Q. Monitor
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    Quote Originally Posted by sabang View Post
    Iron ore prices are skyrocketing (the chinks are already squealing), and China is now paying a substantial premium for lesser grade coal from China and Mongolia- having stopped importing higher grade but cheaper aussie coal, for now. We're very good at digging big holes in Australia- be it our big mouthed politicians digging us into a diplomatic hole with China and costing us billions, or our world class miners.

    Like I said earlier, it is a lose/ lose situation. Hopefully economic rationality will prevail going forward.

    Ironically, due to strong demand from China and rocketing iron ore prices, overall Australian exports to China are hardly even impacted YoY. But that is cold comfort to our wine, lobster, barley and coal exporters.
    You appear to suggest from your posts on this issue that Australia is at fault and should just acquiesce to China for the sake of trade. While practically it makes some sort of sense, morally it is a repugnant idea. The government and business has been warned over many years not to be over reliant on exports to China which have been ignored in the greedy pursuit of profit and tax revenue . The Chinese have proven themselves to be totally untrustworthy and have broken the free trade agreement with spurious unproven claims and plain lies.
    To say that Australia's premium priced wine is being dumped in China when there are many countries that export wine at much lower prices to China shows how weak that statement is apart from it being an obvious outright lie with no evidence.
    Maybe we should tell them we are unable to export iron ore without wine, Barley and Timber as it is uneconomical. No more fanciful than the lies from China. We must diversify away from China and in the short term buy only what cannot be sourced elsewhere. This wont hurt China which is proving to be a bad neighbour around South East Asia, but the least reliant we are the better.

  20. #445
    Member Wakey's Avatar
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    The only thing making China powerful is the US and EU trade deficits. Eliminate those and China will be in the red.

    Country / Region Total trade Exports Imports Trade
    balance
    Total 4,107.1 2,263.3 1,843.7 419.6
    1 United States 583.3 429.7 153.9 275.8
    2 European Union 573.08 375.1 197.9 177.1
    3 Japan 303.0 137.2 165.8 -28.6
    4 Hong Kong 286.5 279.2 73.1 206.1
    5 South Korea 280.2 102.7 177.5 -74.8
    6 Taiwan 199.9 43.9 155.9 -112
    7 Australia 136.4 41.4 95.0 -53.6
    8 Vietnam 121.9 71.6 50.3 21.3
    9 Malaysia 96.1 41.7 54.4 -12.7
    10 Brazil 87 28.9 58.8 -29.9

  21. #446
    Hansum Man! panama hat's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sabang View Post
    Ftfy.
    Except that's not how it works as you didn't 'fix' anything, rather avoided discussing the issue


    Quote Originally Posted by Hugh Cow View Post
    This wont hurt China which is proving to be a bad neighbour around South East Asia, but the least reliant we are the better.
    Absolutely . . . but oddly enough exports to China have increased . . . deceitful fuckers

  22. #447
    Chinese spy
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    Australia is not the Dep'ty Sheriff. China and the US are both valuable to us, in different ways. And they both have their problems too- neither seems to me a good role model for modern Australia.

  23. #448
    Hansum Man! panama hat's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sabang View Post
    Australia is not the Dep'ty Sheriff.
    Nor is it trying to be . . . nor is it a dishrag for China

  24. #449
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    Or a toerag for the USA. Australia should pursue it's own policies, and as far as possible maintain friendly relations with both countries.

  25. #450
    Thailand Expat harrybarracuda's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sabang View Post
    Or a toerag for the USA. Australia should pursue it's own policies, and as far as possible maintain friendly relations with both countries.
    "as far as possible", which to you presumably means caving every time the chinkies do something outrageous.

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