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  1. #1
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    3 Georges Dam collaps Simulation

    So what happens if they cant keep the water back? The valley is a major crop producing area, China has a drought in the north and a locust infestation as well. In my opinion i think we will see China having to import a lot of grain soon, unless they managed to remove the stockpiles in the flood areas before the flooding came, but even if so they will be a season of crop behind.
    So my conspiracy theary is that rice prices, pork prices, grain prices are going up soon.
    No problem for me cause i live on a rice valley owned by the wife's family, and pork farms too.
    But if i was a cheap charlie in Pattaya or Phuket id be saving up some cash for higher food prices.
    Who KNOWS. But not much about it on the mainstream news.

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    In fact pork prices already rose after China lost a third of its pigs to swine flu last year and ramped up imports. I believe the US has been very successful selling pigs to China.
    Just to be really jolly about things, there is a new strain of swine flu in China known as G4. Many people who work with pigs have been infected, a zoonotic virus that can cross the species barrier. So far there are no known cases of human to human transmission.
    So far ....

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    Hansum Man! panama hat's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by deeks View Post
    So my conspiracy theary is that rice prices, pork prices, grain prices are going up soon.
    You're probably spot on there - China had to subsidise pork prices recently and it will only get worse and that's not good for a totalitarian regime . . . an unhappy population . . . of 1.3 billion

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    Thailand Expat tomcat's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by deeks View Post
    3 Georges Dam collaps Simulation
    ...which 3 Georges did you have in mind?...

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    The three Brians perhaps.

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    Water projects stand test of strongest floods in 20 years

    By HOU LIQIANG in Beijing and LIU KUN in Wuhan | CHINA DAILY | Updated: 2020-07-28 06:55

    3 Georges Dam collaps Simulation-5f1f5b52a3108348fce0a288-jpeg

    The Three Gorges Dam in Yichang, Hubei province, discharges excess floodwater on Monday. The dam has played a key role in flood relief efforts in the middle and lower reaches of the Yangtze River.

    "Chen Jionghong, who helps divert floodwaters to storage areas in the Yangtze River Basin, has become used to late nights at the office, cold food and instant noodles as the strongest floods in more than two decades hit the region.
    Since June, when the Yangtze basin entered its main rainy season, he hardly ever has time to go to the work canteen, even though it's only a five-minute walk from his office in Wuhan, Hubei province.

    The canteen staff sends lunch and supper to his office, but the food is often cold by the time he can eat it. For other times, there are instant noodles, said Chen, deputy director of the water conservancy project operation division at the Changjiang Water Resources Commission's Flood and Drought Prevention Bureau.

    As the strongest floods since 1998 rage through many areas along Asia's longest river, Chen is just one of thousands of commission employees devoted to flood control.

    Based on information from over 30,000 hydrological and rain-monitoring stations, the commission holds joint conferences twice a day. More than 30 of Chen's colleagues take part, including leaders of the commission, a body of the Ministry of Water Resources.

    "Based on real time hydrological and rainfall information and forecasts, we discuss the operational plan-which water conservancy projects we are going to mobilize to help store floodwater," he said.

    Aside from the conferences, which usually last two to three hours but occasionally run longer, Chen and his colleagues have a lot of other work to grapple with, and treacherous weather can make them even busier.

    "Some rainfall doesn't fall as forecast. Some downpours may be heavier than predicted. This could result in a flood control situation different from our expectations. In such cases, we have to adjust the operation plans accordingly and in a timely manner," he said.

    Once rain falls in the Yangtze basin, the team is informed. Based on water levels and flow rates at hydrological stations and weather forecasts, they determine how to help those downstream avoid inundation.

    Over 20 flood control experts regularly work with Chen's department, and they often work late into the night. Amid the complications and difficulties, he often knocks off at around 1 am, but sometimes works until 3 am.

    The commission says there are 101 key water conservancy projects facilitating flood control efforts in the Yangtze basin this year, including 41 reservoirs, 46 flood detention areas, 10 pump stations and four water diversion projects.

    The reservoirs can store 57.4 billion cubic meters of water and the flood detention areas another 59.1 billion cubic meters, it said.
    Chen's department also must call all the water conservancy projects involved in the dynamic operational plans and ensure their implementation. "Communication needs to be done repeatedly," he said.

    A lot of work has to be done at night. Though his home is only a half-hour drive away, Chen and his colleagues sleep in the office at times to be available when needed. They have to work without a day off during flood season.

    "It's not easy for my two children to see me during flood season," he said. "Once they hear the doorbell, they know it's me. They are so excited that they rush to the door."

    There are over 52,000 reservoirs in the Yangtze basin, and many discharge water before the rainy season to help accommodate floodwaters.

    Operation proves effective
    T
    he hard work of Chen and his colleagues has paid off. The operation of reservoirs in the upper and middle reaches of the Yangtze have played an important role in avoiding the large-scale evacuation of people near Dongting Lake, the second-largest freshwater lake in China, when the Yangtze was hit by the year's first flood early this month.

    Chen Jionghong and Chen Guiya, the commission's deputy chief engineer, rebutted a recent report by Reuters that cast doubt on the effectiveness of the flood mitigation role of the Three Gorges Dam.

    Before the Yangtze's first flood of the year arrived at the dam on July 2, the commission drafted a plan to mobilize the Three Gorges reservoir and other major reservoirs in the middle and lower reaches of the Yangtze to help keep the water level at Chenglingji hydrological station below 34.4 meters, which is the maximum design level for dikes in the section.

    Chenglingji is where the Yangtze meets Dongting Lake.

    "The target was met. The highest water level at the station during the time only reached 34.34 meters," Chen Jionghong said, adding that a rough calculation by the commission showed that the water level could have exceeded 35.1 meters without the reservoirs' help.

    If the water level at the station had exceeded the maximum level for dikes and kept rising, nearby flood detention areas would have had to be used. That would have necessitated the evacuation of a large number of people from areas to be inundated, he said.

    "Our work is people-centered. That is to say, we have to guarantee the safety of people's lives and property," Chen Jionghong said.
    Record high water levels at some hydrological stations at Poyang Lake, the country's largest freshwater lake, were cited by Reuters to support the claim that the Three Gorges Dam had failed to play its role in mitigating floods.

    But Chen Guiya said that while the Hukou hydrological station, where the Yangtze meets Poyang Lake, is far from the Three Gorges Dam, calculations by the commission showed that the reservoirs in the upper and middle reaches of Yangtze had helped reduce the water level there by 0.2 meters during the first flood of the year.

    That helped keep the highest water level at the Hukou station to 22.49 meters, 1 centimeter lower than the maximum design level for dike safety and 10 centimeters lower than the record high, even as some stations at the lake hit historic highs. Without the help of those reservoirs, the pressure on flood control around Poyang Lake would have been massive, he said.

    "The Three Gorges Dam played a marked role," Chen Guiya said.

    He said the help the Three Gorges Dam provided to Poyang Lake was not as notable as that to Dongting Lake because more water entered the mainstream of the Yangtze from its tributaries as the river flowed eastward. Meanwhile, Poyang Lake also got a lot of water from rivers in its own basin. On July 11, for example, over 45,000 cubic meters of water entered the lake each second.

    Since June, the Yangtze basin has been hit by six episodes of torrential rain with hardly a break. The precipitation in the mainstream of the Yangtze's middle reach and the northern parts of the Poyang Lake basin was more than double the annual average, said Hu Xiangyang, director-general of the commission's Flood and Drought Prevention Bureau.

    The rain has gotten heavier this month, with precipitation in the Poyang basin early this month three times the annual average, he said at a news conference on July 20.
    The National Meteorological Center said that from June 1 to July 9, the average precipitation in the Yangtze basin reached 369.9 millimeters, the highest in the same period since 1961, and 54.8 mm more than the same period in 1998.
    Despite historic precipitation, Chen Jionghong said he is confident the commission is capable of tackling the situation through key reservoirs.
    As of July 21, reservoirs in the upper and middle reaches of the Yangtze had helped store 24 billion cubic meters of floodwater, with half of that amount held back by the Three Gorges Dam.

    The available floodwater storage capacity of all the key reservoirs stands at about 33 billion cubic meters, Chen Jionghong said.

    "We still have capacity large enough to prevent major floods," he said. "The public don't need to worry. We are capable of coping with the situation this year."

    3 Georges Dam collaps Simulation-5f1f5b52a3108348fce0a29a-jpg


    Water projects stand test of strongest floods in 20 years - Chinadaily.com.Chinese

    Chinese people and systems working as trained and designed, to reduce loss of Chinese citizen's lives, homes and jobs, in times of dangerous natural events.

    On the same topic a similar article, although more local efforts.

    China to enhance dike patrols for flood control - Chinadaily.com.cn
    Last edited by OhOh; 31-07-2020 at 02:48 PM.
    A tray full of GOLD is not worth a moment in time.

  7. #7
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    Science Shows Chinese Dams Are Devastating the Mekong


    New data demonstrates a devastating effect on downstream water supplies that feed millions of people.

    Chinese Dams Are Wrecking the Mekong River

  8. #8
    Thailand Expat harrybarracuda's Avatar
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    The chinkies can now use water to blackmail every country downstream.

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    Have seen some reports that they are seeing distortion in the dam automated measurement system. Government denies it but that sucker is full up!

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by harrybarracuda View Post
    The chinkies can now use water to blackmail every country downstream.
    They can fill up their own dams, and then?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Latindancer View Post
    devastating effect on downstream water supplies that feed millions of people.
    Don't worry there are ample supplies of Oats, so your weaponised porridge will not be hard to find.

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    Quote Originally Posted by OhOh View Post
    Don't worry there are ample supplies of Oats, so your weaponised porridge will not be hard to find.
    That's how you address potential starvation? You really are five shades of stupid - but if you can deflect China's immeasurably shit attitudes in many issues . . .

  13. #13
    Thailand Expat harrybarracuda's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by lom View Post
    They can fill up their own dams, and then?
    They control when and how fast water is released.

    Amid pressure from local and international environmental groups, Cambodia took the initiative in March to announce a ten-year moratorium on new dam projects in an effort to protect downstream areas like Tonle Sap. But the problems with Tonle Sap’s fisheries begin much further upstream with hydropower dams in China and the way those facilities manage the storage and release of water.
    Mekong dams destroy Tonle Sap Lake |The Third Pole

  14. #14
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    ...a similar problem in northeast Africa with Ethiopia beginning to fill its (Chinese-financed) Blue Nile dam...Egypt, of course, depends on the Nile for its existence...

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    Quote Originally Posted by harrybarracuda View Post
    They control when and how fast water is released.
    Yes but once filled up they can't do much else than release the same amount that arrives in the next monsoon rain.

  16. #16
    Thailand Expat tomcat's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by lom View Post
    Yes but once filled up they can't do much else than release the same amount that arrives in the next monsoon rain.
    ...the problem, of course, is if the monsoon fails...

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    And in between the fields dry up - which makes OhOh happy

  18. #18
    Thailand Expat harrybarracuda's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by lom View Post
    Yes but once filled up they can't do much else than release the same amount that arrives in the next monsoon rain.
    How often do you think they "fill up"?

    Have you seen the state of the lower Mekong recently?

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    The Chinese again,jeez to think of all the other water conflicts around the globe, and yep the Chinese are to blame for all.

    beggars belief how some of you, are so controlled by the media.

  20. #20
    Thailand Expat harrybarracuda's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chico View Post
    The Chinese again,jeez to think of all the other water conflicts around the globe, and yep the Chinese are to blame for all.

    beggars belief how some of you, are so controlled by the media.
    By all means elucidate on how many "water conflicts around the globe" have the scale of this one.

    Your starting point is the 243 million people in the lower Mekong countries.

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by tomcat View Post
    ...a similar problem in northeast Africa with Ethiopia beginning to fill its (Chinese-financed) Blue Nile dam...Egypt, of course, depends on the Nile for its existence...
    Grand Ethiopian Renaissance Dam

    Cost and financing

    "The Ethiopian government has stated that it intends to fund the entire cost of the dam by itself in order to prevent relying on foreign countries who may be brought under pressure by Egypt to withdraw their support. Ethiopia has issued a bond targeted at Ethiopians in the country and abroad to that end.[18] The turbines and associated electrical equipment of the hydropower plants costing about US$1.8 billion are reportedly financed by Chinese banks. This would leave US$3 billion to be financed by the Ethiopian government through other means.[31] The estimated US$4.8 billion construction cost, apparently excluding the cost of power transmission lines, corresponds to about 5% of Ethiopia's gross domestic product of US$87 billion in 2017. "

    Design


    The design changed several times between 2011 and 2017. This affected both the electrical parameters and the storage parameters.
    Originally, in 2011, the hydropower plant was to receive 15 generating units with 350 MW nameplate capacity each, resulting in a total installed capacity of 5,250 MW with an expected power generation of 15,128 GWh per annum.[32] However, due to the upgrading of the power plant and the housing facilities, its generation capacity was uplifted to 6,000 MW from 5,250 MW, with a power generation of 15,692 GWh per annum through 16 generating units with 375 MW nameplate capacity each. In 2017, the design was again changed to add another 450 MW, with a power generation of 16,153 GWh per annum.[4][33] That was achieved by upgrading 14 of the 16 generating units from 375 MW to 400 MW without changing the nameplate capacity.[34]

    Benefits

    A major benefit of the dam will be hydropower production. All the energy generated by GERD will be going into the national grid of Ethiopia to fully support the development of the whole country, both in rural and urban areas. The role of GERD will be to act as a stabilizing backbone of the Ethiopian national grid. There will be exports, but only if there is a total surplus of energy generated in Ethiopia. This is mainly expected to happen during rainy seasons, when there is plenty of water for hydropower generation.[3]

    The eventual surplus electricity of GERD which does not fit the demand inside Ethiopia, is then to be sold and exported to neighboring countries including Sudan and possibly Egypt, but also Djibouti.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grand_Ethiopian_Renaissance_Dam

    It appears that the largest portion 62.8%, has been offered to the public utilising Government bonds.

    More background:


    The Grand Ethiopian Renaissance Dam (GERD) is a Pan-African Project



    https://ecadforum.com/2020/06/26/the...rican-project/


    THE CROCODILE TEAR OF EGYPT AND THE GRAND ETHIOPIAN RENAISSANCE DAM (GERD)


    https://www.zehabesha.com/the-crocod...ance-dam-gerd/
    Last edited by OhOh; 01-08-2020 at 11:11 PM.

  22. #22
    Thailand Expat lom's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by harrybarracuda View Post
    Have you seen the state of the lower Mekong recently?
    Caused by El Nino, a couple of hot years in a row with much less than normal of rain.

    The hydro power dams in China and Laos can delay the water flow while they are filling up, they borrow water for a while but they don't steal it.

  23. #23
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    This dam collapse story is just a ruse dreamed up by the regime change swine in the US.

    Oh man , the dam is gonna collapse , then China is gonna collapse. Then they will want democracy and F-16's.

  24. #24
    Thailand Expat harrybarracuda's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by lom View Post
    Caused by El Nino, a couple of hot years in a row with much less than normal of rain.

    The hydro power dams in China and Laos can delay the water flow while they are filling up, they borrow water for a while but they don't steal it.
    Don't be silly, El Nino is a regular event and yet Tonle Sap has never been this badly affected. And while it was drying, the chinkies were holding back huge amounts of water, as evidenced by satellite photos.

    You sound like another chinky apologist.
    Last edited by harrybarracuda; 02-08-2020 at 01:58 PM.

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by OhOh View Post
    THE GRAND ETHIOPIAN RENAISSANCE DAM (GERD)
    An appropriate acronym.

    GERD is also Gastro Esophageal Reflux Disease and as the Chinese are involved, the effects of both will be similar : a big pain in the gut.

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