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  1. #1
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    Why dont whites riot?

    Stumbled on this video and i liked the guys perspective, easy goin and pretty well down to earth matter of fact, for those of us born before the 90's anyway.

  2. #2
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    Cronulla riots in 2005 ring a bell?

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    Thailand Expat misskit's Avatar
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    Who says they don’t?


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    Thailand Expat harrybarracuda's Avatar
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    Why is deeks a trolling cock?

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    White people riot when their favorite sports team loses.

  6. #6
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    Indeed, some of the best are football riots.


    England away was good

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by pickel View Post
    White people riot when their favorite sports team loses.
    Just who do you think comprises most of the rioters in London?, they are doing a great job of it - every time there's a righteous cause the twats come out. There's even more now they are getting paid not to work. Still they are doing a great job with Covid...one can only hope Khan get its too.

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    Quote Originally Posted by harrybarracuda View Post
    Why is deeks a trolling cock?

  9. #9
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  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by happynz View Post
    Cronulla riots in 2005 ring a bell?
    Kids.

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    I agree with him because im probably around the same age, and ive paid me taxes already so they cant take any more off me, and if they decide they want to,then i'll just sell my assets up and move my money out of the country. So these rioters are fucked, they will not get a cent from me.

  12. #12
    Hangin' Around cyrille's Avatar
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    Looks like another thread title from a poster who thinks he’s commenting on the world but is actually commenting solely on the U.S.

    It’s unfortunate when people get these mixed up.

  13. #13
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    ^ ever been on a march Syb? we know you think bodies of men together like the forces are a bunch of losers in your mind, so have you got together with the Alt Left and shouted your rage against the machine.

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    .................

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by cyrille View Post
    commenting on the world but is actually commenting solely on the U.S.
    what have you got to say to these officers families Syb?

    George Floyd: London anti-racism protests leave 27 officers hurt


    George Floyd: London anti-racism protests leave 27 officers hurt - BBC News

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by NamPikToot View Post
    what have you got to say to these officers families Syb?

    George Floyd: London anti-racism protests leave 27 officers hurt


    George Floyd: London anti-racism protests leave 27 officers hurt - BBC News
    Im a bit miffed. I cant remember any coppers being injured when Tommy Robinson protests were happening, you know the far right violent extremists,caugh,

  17. #17
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    ^
    Birds of a feather and all that.

  18. #18
    The Dentist English Noodles's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by deeks View Post
    Why dont whites riot?
    Too busy working.

  19. #19
    disturbance in the Turnip baldrick's Avatar
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    why are tattoos black ?

  20. #20
    ความรู้ลึกลับ HuangLao's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by baldrick View Post
    why are tattoos black ?
    To throw ya off kilter -

  21. #21
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    Peasant's Revolt 1381...now that was a decent, all white, riot.

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by deeks View Post
    Stumbled on this video and i liked the guys perspective, easy goin and pretty well down to earth matter of fact, for those of us born before the 90's anyway.
    The reason white guys don't riot is it's a white mans world. Got nothing to riot about.

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by deeks View Post
    I agree with him because im probably around the same age, and ive paid me taxes already so they cant take any more off me, and if they decide they want to,then i'll just sell my assets up and move my money out of the country. So these rioters are fucked, they will not get a cent from me.
    The Floyd/BLM rioters want money from you?

  24. #24
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    ^ Not in the Loy Toy world mate!

  25. #25
    Isle of Discombobulation
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    Quote Originally Posted by Troy View Post
    Peasant's Revolt 1381...now that was a decent, all white, riot.
    I beg to differ Troy..

    Modern histories of the English civil war of the 1640s tend to focus upon set-piece battles and major sieges. This is understandable, as they were not only the biggest war-time military operations but also those which are most fully recorded in surviving sources and so most accessible to historians. However, they were not the commonest form of fighting, certainly not in England and Wales during the main civil war of 1642-46. Far more typical were much smaller and more limited engagements, ranging from skirmishes and raids to beating-up quarters and opportunist strikes. Each involved modest numbers of soldiers and resulted in equally modest casualties, although cumulatively they probably accounted for the majority of those killed and seriously wounded in action in England and Wales. Historians can never recover a complete picture of such small-scale operations, for they were only occasionally recorded in the weekly newspapers of the war years and in other contemporary accounts. Evidently, very many minor clashes of this ilk passed by entirely unrecorded. But where surviving sources do provide reasonably detailed accounts of this level of fighting, they can give an insight into the war at a local level and a flavour of the sort of operations which were typical of the local experience of the fighting.

    The classic surviving account of a skirmish is that recalled and recorded many years later by the Shropshire antiquarian Richard Gough as the only significant fighting to have occurred during the war in his home village of Myddle in northern Shropshire. ‘There was one Cornet Collins, an Irishman, who was a garrison soldier for the king at Shrawardine Castle. This Collins made his excursions very often into this parish, and took away cattle, provision and bedding and what he pleased. On the day before this conflict, he had been at Myddle taking away bedding and when Margaret, the wife of the Allen Chaloner, the smith, had brought out and showed him her best bed, he thinking it too coarse, cast it into the lake before the door and trod it under his horse[’s] feet’. Collins and seven royalist colleagues from Shrawardine halted in the village the next day, so that Collins could have his horse reshod at the smithy, but they stumbled into a party of eight parliamentarian troops from Morton Corbet garrison, commanded by Richard Maning. They had come to the village not in the hope of finding royalists but rather to search for and to pursue a grudge against a particular individual. ‘This Maning and his companions…came into Myddle at the gate by Mr Gittin’s house, at what time the cornet’s horse was a-shoeing. The cornet hearing the gate clap looked by the end of the shop and saw the soldiers coming and thereupon he and his men mounted their horses; and as the cornet came at the end of the shop, a brisk young fellow shot him through the body with a carbine shot, and he fell down in the lake at Allen Chaloner’s door. His men fled, two were taken, and as Maning was pursuing them in Myddle Wood Field,…Maning having the best horse overtook them while his partners were far behind, but one of the cornet’s men shot Maning’s horse which fell down dead under him, and Maning had been taken prisoner had not some of his men came to rescue him…The horse was killed on a bank near the further side of Myddle Field, where the widow Mansell has now a piece enclosed. The cornet was carried into Allen Chaloner’s house and laid on the floor; he desired to have a bed laid under him, but Margaret told him she had none but that which he saw yesterday; he prayed her to forgive him and lay that under him, which she did’. Gough certainly recalled the aftermath, despite the passage of the years. ‘Mr Roderick [the minister] was sent to pray with him [Collins]. I went with him and saw the cornet lying on the bed and much blood running along the floor. In the night following a troop of horses came from Shrawardine and pressed a team in Myddle and so took the cornet to Shrawardine, where he died the next day’. This had been an accidental, unplanned and wholly unexpected encounter between two small groups of eight or so mounted troops based in rival garrisons in Shropshire occurring in the no-man’s land between them, a clash in a village which otherwise saw no fighting but which nonetheless left a man shot and slowly bleeding to death, a horse killed and two men prisoners, who were executed by hanging shortly afterwards.

    Another example of a limited and opportunist operation was related by the secretary of the parliamentarian John Birch in his later biography of his master. He provided a colourful account of how one evening at the end of October 1644, shortly after the indecisive second battle of Newbury in Berkshire, they had been riding outside the town when they quickly drew aside on hearing the approach of coaches. Shielding their faces so as not to be identified in the moonlight as enemies, they were able to watch unmolested as a royalist mounted party comprising nearly 100 troopers, three coaches, waggons and unmounted horses, rattled past through the night. Holding up a straggler at pistol point, they discovered that it was the royalist lord general, Lord Forth, together with his wife and female relatives, his goods and a mounted guard, travelling through the night from Donnington Castle, where he had remained after being wounded in the battle, in order to rejoin the king and the main royalist army. Determined to capture such a rich prize, Birch returned to the parliamentarian HQ in Newbury, but he was unable to interest a sleepy Earl of Manchester City in the operation. Nonetheless, rousing some soldiers, Birch quickly managed to gather together a party of around 50 parliamentarian cavalrymen who were interested in the venture and the potential prize. They pursued Forth’s party through the dark night, Birch several times feeling for the fresh coach tracks to guide them. Having travelled sixteen miles and with dawn approaching, they bumped into a small royalist party by a gate which Forth had cautiously left behind as a rear-guard. Birch approached a sentry pretending to be a traveller who had lost his way and was seeking directions, and not until too late did the man realise what was happening; he attempted to draw his sword, but Birch had his at the ready under his cloak and ‘made such a hole in his skin as brought a groan from him’. Birch’s colleagues then helped him overcome the remainder of the twelve-strong royalist rear-guard, who ‘were quickly dispatched’. But the main royalist party, who had halted in the village beyond, saw or heard what was afoot and attempted quickly to turn out, whereupon Birch’s party immediately attacked, as they did so attempting to unnerve their opponents by pretending that they were merely the advanced unit of a much bigger force, arranging for several trumpets to sound behind them and crying ‘aloud “Gentlemen, let’s not stay for the body of horse but fall on them instantly”, which at a high trot was done and they presently routed’. Two bodies of royalist horse were attacked and put to flight, though this gave Forth and his party sufficient time to move off, some on horseback, others in the coaches. Birch and his men pursued the coaches for a further four or five miles, until they entered another village, where a substantial body of royalist lifeguards were stationed. Again, Birch bluffed that he had a much larger parliamentarian army just behind him by shouting out as if giving orders, ‘Gentlemen, lay out quarters in this town presently for my Lord Manchester’ Citys regiment of horse’ and ‘in the next village let Sir William Waller’s regiment quarter’, accompanied by some of his party sounding trumpets behind him. Even though Birch’s men were in fact outnumbered by three to one, the royalist lifeguards fell back and without further opposition Birch captured the coaches and waggons, including female members of Forth’s family, horses and various prisoners, though Forth himself had escaped on horseback. Although now a good twenty miles from their base and deep in royalist territory, Birch and his party managed to get their prizes safely back to Newbury.


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