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  1. #1
    Thailand Expat David48atTD's Avatar
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    Electric or hydrogen — which will win the clean car race?



    Clean transport is a hot topic, and as we move towards a low-emissions economy and international manufacturers phase out conventional vehicles, both electric and hydrogen are vying for a place.

    Key points:
    • Electric vehicles are coming down in price but local availability needs to improve
    • A national refuelling network is required to make hydrogen vehicles a viable option
    • A mix of technologies will help make the transition to clean vehicles


    And with good reason. At the moment, transport contributes almost a fifth of Australia's greenhouse gas emissions — with passenger cars and road freight together emitting more than three-quarters of the transport sector's share.

    Overall transport emissions have grown 1.3 per cent since last year, as motorists switch from petrol to diesel vehicles and freight activity rises.
    But the need to reduce emissions isn't the only driver for a transition to cleaner transport.

    Concerns over the security of our petrol and diesel supply, shifts in international car manufacturing trends and the health impacts of exhaust fumes are piquing interest in greener options.


    https://tinyurl.com/vb5cfgs

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    “Someone is sitting in the shade today because someone planted a tree a long time ago”

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  2. #2
    Thailand Expat David48atTD's Avatar
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    ^ Following on

    What challenges still face electric vehicles?

    Mr Kennedy says that while electric vehicles are technically ready for the Australian market, price is an issue for many potential buyers.
    The upfront cost of new vehicles ranges from just under $60,000 for the Holden Volt to $100,000 for the Tesla Model S.
    But this is likely to change in the near future, with scaled-up production of electric vehicles and cheaper lithium-ion batteries driving costs down.




    Bloomberg New Energy Finance predicts that electric vehicles could be more cost effective than conventional cars by 2022 in terms of purchase price and running costs, and Dr Christopher Munnings from CSIRO says electric vehicles are already cost-competitive in the luxury SUV market.

    Motorists wanting to buy more than one electric vehicle may also run into challenges as home grid connections don't have the capacity to charge multiple vehicles at once, especially on hot days.

    But CSIRO is working with Nissan Australia and Delta Electronics to develop a smart charger which can replenish up to four electric vehicles from home battery storage connected to rooftop solar.
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  3. #3
    Thailand Expat David48atTD's Avatar
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    ^ ^^

    What about hydrogen?



    For hydrogen-fuelled vehicles, the biggest obstacle is the lack of refuelling stations.

    Fiona Simon, CEO of the Australian Hydrogen Council, says this is key to widespread adoption of the technology, and this can be achieved if industry and government work together.
    "Overseas, governments and industry have collaborated to establish the supporting infrastructure," she says.


    Chief scientist Dr Alan Finkel is leading the development of a National Hydrogen Strategy, which is due to be completed at the end of the year.
    If the plan mandates a national hydrogen refuelling network, this could very quickly lead to HFCEVs becoming viable in the local market.
    Dr Munnings is a strong advocate for a mix of hydrogen and electric vehicles.

    He explains that hydrogen may be better suited to long distance, back-to-base transport such as buses and long-haul trucks, while electric vehicles are a good solution for the light passenger vehicle market.


    "If we want to get to the point where we have clean air in our cities we need both," Dr Munnings says.
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  4. #4
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    harrybarracuda's Avatar
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    I would have thought electric.

    Think of the infrastructure costs of storing and transporting a liquified flammable gas like Hydrogen?

  5. #5
    Thailand Expat AntRobertson's Avatar
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    Just saw this earlier today coincidentally enough:



  6. #6
    Thailand Expat David48atTD's Avatar
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    ^ Good find

  7. #7
    Thailand Expat VocalNeal's Avatar
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    The battery boys need to agree on a standard plug/socket system. Currently it is like VHS vs Betamax.

  8. #8
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    Troy's Avatar
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    Neither beats a diesel...

    Hydrogen will provide some explosive action and electric will produce some unwanted combustion and silent murders.

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