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  1. #426
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    Yet another “opinion”. If only Simon Jenkins were running the country. He is ideally qualified by his hatred of the Conservative Party in general, and the current PM in particular. This is why successive governments have always supported freedom of speech and a free press.

    With these opinions, I’m sure he would enjoy telling Russia or North Korea, exactly what they are doing wrong.

    Sorry Cyrille. Nice try but are still a socialist hypocrite. Still unable to form an opinion of your own, unless you read it in the Guardian first.

  2. #427
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    I wouldn't be surprised if the pathetic scrote resigns in the autumn, citing a need to fully recover from his illness.

    He's plainly only interested in the job as one big game, and the mindless diversion he provides is simply not what the country is looking for anymore.

    The culprit for the entire exams shambles was, in his words, a 'mutant algorithm', and that wording is typical Boris. Superficially it's just a jolly jape, but underneath...it's a suggestion of something that acted malevolently through no fault of any human being.

    It's typical of the way he tries to shrug off responsibility, like a more erudite Trump.

    Meanwhile his popularity is hemorrhaging away, and KS becomes stronger.

  3. #428
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    Quote Originally Posted by cyrille View Post
    I wouldn't be surprised if the pathetic scrote resigns in the autumn, citing a need to fully recover from his illness.

    He's plainly only interested in the job as one big game, and the mindless diversion he provides is simply not what the country is looking for anymore.

    The culprit for the entire exams shambles was, in his words, a 'mutant algorithm', and that wording is typical Boris. Superficially it's just a jolly jape, but underneath...it's a suggestion of something that acted malevolently through no fault of any human being.

    It's typical of the way he tries to shrug off responsibility, like a more erudite Trump.

    Meanwhile his popularity is hemorrhaging away, and KS becomes stronger.
    As I posted previously, it is not difficult for people like you, or Starmer to snipe from the sidelines. The world is subject to unprecedented chaos, and all you can do is whine about how people are dealing with it from the perspective of a complete outsider.
    The fact is, that the scale of issues and scope of potential solutions Is completely new to governments the world over.
    Starmers job is to hold the government to account for the choices they make in dealing with the problem. Neither he, or you are any good at that. How the hell do you expect to be taken seriously when you behave so negatively, just because the chosen solution does not meet your socialist expectations?

    The fact that you don’t live in the country of your birth, but choose to accept a tax free salary from the most barbaric human rights regime in the world, makes more than a dent in your credibility.
    No one could manage this pandemic to your satisfaction, simply because you have chosen to use it as your personal political football, instead of looking at the bigger, global picture.

    Changing your avatar to a younger cartoon, does not affect the stupidity and selfishness you have displayed in this massively important issue.

  4. #429
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  6. #431
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    A poll by Opinium for the Observer shows Labour is now level-pegging with the Tories for the first time since last summer, before Johnson was leader. In just five months the Conservatives have lost a 26-point lead over Labour who now stand neck-and-neck with the Tories on 40%.

    At the end of March, shortly after Johnson imposed the full lockdown, the Conservatives were surging ahead on 54% of the vote, with Labour, awaiting the result of the party’s leadership election, on 28%. At the time Johnson’s personal ratings were also very positive, but are now consistently well behind those of the Labour leader, Keir Starmer.
    BoJo's personal and party ratings are in free fall, and the full effect of the BREXIT fiasco is still to come.

    No wonder nobody wants to be his 'US style' spokesperson, even for 100,000 quid a year. Such an obvious attempt to hide his idiocy away.

  7. #432
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    Quote Originally Posted by cyrille View Post
    BoJo's personal and party ratings are in free fall, and the full effect of the BREXIT fiasco is still to come.

    No wonder nobody wants to be his 'US style' spokesperson, even for 100,000 quid a year. Such an obvious attempt to hide his idiocy away.
    I’m sure voters are impressed with Starmer holding the government to account.After all, that’s his only job. He doesn’t have to worry about running the country, and he never will have those concerns. How could one person cope with such pressure on top of a global pandemic.
    Starmer will never have that problem, when he failed so spectacularly as DPP. One job, just one bloody job. Hahahahaha

  8. #433
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    Quote Originally Posted by Switch View Post
    The world is subject to unprecedented chaos, and all you can do is whine about how people are dealing with it from the perspective of a complete outsider.
    The fact is, that the scale of issues and scope of potential solutions Is completely new to governments the world over.
    yeah, but the fact is some of those "governments the world over" were able to rise and meet the challenge.

    bojo the clown clearly did not...and let's be frank, it's not surprising. he's a showman, not a leader. he's the UK version of trump.
    you know it, i know it...everyone knows it.

    if he were a member of the labor party you'd be thrashing him mercilessly for his myriad failures....that you now choose to ignore and excuse because of partisanship.


    and btw, how much of a factor to the 'unprecedented chaos" you mention is due to the no deal brexit that is barreling down the tracks?

  9. #434
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    Quote Originally Posted by raycarey View Post
    yeah, but the fact is some of those "governments the world over" were able to rise and meet the challenge.

    bojo the clown clearly did not...and let's be frank, it's not surprising. he's a showman, not a leader. he's the UK version of trump.
    you know it, i know it...everyone knows it.

    if he were a member of the labor party you'd be thrashing him mercilessly for his myriad failures....that you now choose to ignore and excuse because of partisanship.


    and btw, how much of a factor to the 'unprecedented chaos" you mention is due to the no deal brexit that is barreling down the tracks?
    Cyrille is the same as you. A no mark shitcunt, spouting complete bollox about something he has no knowledge of.
    Go stir some shit up about US politics, you clearly have no idea about UK or Europe.

  10. #435
    Thailand Expat raycarey's Avatar
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    uh-oh, switch.....looks like even tory activists aren't willing to accept your pathetic excuses for bojo the clown that


    Quote Originally Posted by Switch View Post
    The world is subject to unprecedented chaos
    and that

    Quote Originally Posted by Switch View Post
    the scale of issues and scope of potential solutions Is completely new to governments the world over.


    the latest survey for ConservativeHome, the website for party members, shows Johnson has suffered a dramatic fall in his standing among Tory activists. In December 2019, shortly after the general election, he topped the net satisfaction rating among cabinet members with a score of plus-92.5% while Sunak was fourth on plus-78.5%. Now Johnson has slumped down into the bottom third with a rating of plus-24.6% and Sunak is way out in front on plus-82.5%
    Johnson at bay, Starmer on the rise … and Sunak waiting in the wings | Politics | The Guardian


    he's the UK version of trump....an entertainer that's masquerading as a leader......and every day more people grow tired of his act.

    you know it's true....do yourself a favor and stop digging.

  11. #436
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    Did you see his last shambolic performance?

    He tries to mke it personal every time to avoid the issues.

    Maybe that's what appeals to twitch.


  12. #437
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    Quote Originally Posted by crackerjack101 View Post
    Usually enjoy this guy, though I'm sure he understands the BBC are supposed to be impartial

  13. #438
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    Cyrille and Ray read the same news media. Why am I not surprised?

    People quite rightly question the BBC political bias, because it’s public funded. Not so with the Grauniad, because it’s always been a socialist rag, masquerading as a newspaper.

    Is that the only link available to you communists?

  14. #439
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    ^ It's been explained before...please keep up.

  15. #440
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    Quote Originally Posted by Troy View Post
    ^ It's been explained before...please keep up.
    ..... another whoosh moment for you.

  16. #441
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    FOS....

  17. #442
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    Quote Originally Posted by raycarey View Post
    yeah, but the fact is some of those "governments the world over" were able to rise and meet the challenge.
    Yes Ray, just like the USA. You can fuck off now. No point talking about UK politics when you don’t know how it works.
    You could even say the same about your own country, but you are equally pointless there.

  18. #443
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    going back to a post that's 10 days old to try (and fail) to make some sort of point only reveals your desperation, switch.
    but yeah, go ahead...keep carrying water for bojo the clown.


  19. #444
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    what a disgrace...

    David Cameron on Monday became the fifth former prime minister of the United Kingdom to raise concerns or condemn the government's plan to break international law in order to amend the Brexit deal Boris Johnson agreed to with the European Union last year.

    Johnson is facing a possible intra-party rebellion over a new bill that would override provisions in the Brexit divorce deal related to Northern Ireland, a country in the U.K. that shares a border with EU member state Ireland.

    With talks over a long-term free trade agreement at risk of collapse, the EU has demanded that Johnson scrap the bill and is threatening legal action if he refuses.

    The U.K. is now likely to leave the Brexit transition period on Dec. 31 without a free trade agreement, something that experts have warned could cause significant economic disruptions.

    Theresa May (2016-2019): "How can the government reassure future international partners that the U.K. can be trusted to abide by the legal obligations of the agreements it signs?"

    David Cameron (2010-2016): "Passing an act of Parliament and then going on to break an international treaty obligation is the very, very last thing you should contemplate. It should be an absolute final resort. So I do have misgivings about what's being proposed.

    Gordon Brown (2007-2010): "It's self-harm. You can't sign an international treaty — what was it 12 months ago? The prime minister negotiating it, he's signing it, and then break it. You've got no respect.

    Tony Blair (1997-2007): "What is being proposed now is shocking. How can it be compatible with the codes of conduct that bind ministers, law officers and civil servants deliberately to break treaty obligations?"

    John Major (1990-1997): "For generations, Britain’s word — solemnly given — has been accepted by a friend and foe. Our signature on any treaty or agreement has been sacrosanct. … If we lose our reputation for honoring the promises we make, we will have lost something beyond price that may never be regained."
    https://www.axios.com/uk-prime-ministers-johnson-brexit-law-edd8523d-62fa-463e-8092-02ac4a223f30.html

  20. #445
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    Some men are born mediocre. Some achieve mediocrity. Others have mediocrity thrust upon them. In 1940 we had Winston Churchill. In 2020 we have Boris Johnson, a man who believes himself to be Churchill’s reincarnation, but is nothing more than a poundshop imitation.

    Where to start with the prime minister’s TV address to the nation? The trademark smirk? The nervous hand gestures? The fact he thinks he’s fighting a war, not a pandemic? Or just the brazen cheek as Boris tried to claim the credit for what he called the stunning triumph over the coronavirus so far? The 50,000 dead and the endless screw-ups of his own government, from care homes to test and trace, were simply airbrushed out of history. The prime minister is not just a man without quality. He is a man without shame.

    All this was just a warm up for the grandiose announcement of a few extra restrictions that had already been announced and would almost certainly prove to be insufficient to cope with the second wave. Boris apologised for the new measures, though he laid the blame squarely on the British people for not having been able to abide by the existing measures. Perhaps he should have run that line past Dominic Cummings who set an example so many followed.

    “Never in our history has our collective destiny and our collective health depended so completely on our individual behaviour,” he said, winding up the Churchill rhetoric. “There are unquestionably difficult months to come. And the fight against Covid is by no means over. I have no doubt, however, that there are great days ahead. But now is the time for us all to summon the discipline, and the resolve, and the spirit of togetherness that will carry us through.” Qualities that have yet to be found in Johnson.

    It had been much the same story in the Commons earlier in the day and you had to feel for Chris Whitty and Patrick Vallance, who must now be wondering why they had gone to so much trouble the previous day to explain just how critical the coronavirus rates of infection had become and that the threat had now risen back to level four. For after a few token nods to the gravity of the situation – “a stitch in time saves nine” – Boris Johnson used his commons statement to introduce a few minor tweaks to lockdown restrictions that rather suggested he wasn’t too bothered.

    He wanted schools, colleges, universities and businesses to remain open – with the one proviso that all those he had previously threatened with the sack if they didn’t go back to work were now advised to work from home if at all possible. His biggest change was that pubs, restaurants and bars should now all close at 10pm – it has apparently been proved that the coronavirus is mainly a nocturnal creature and is most contagious after dark – though people were obviously free to go home in groups of six, get totally hammered and infect one another afterwards.

    Like most Johnson statements it felt rather as if it had been written on the fly. By a committee of his left and right brain, with little synaptic contact between the two. There were few attempts to explain the situation carefully and carry the country with him. Just a load of off the cuff measures – mandatory face masks for shop and hospitality workers etc – and the threat of stricter measures to come if people didn’t comply or the restrictions proved ineffective.

    This time he was really, really serious, he said, trying not to smirk. He understood that, unlike the Hun, we Brits were too freedom loving to comply with every law – nothing to do with the government’s mixed messaging obviously – but there were limits. There was nothing the public liked less than one law for the powerful and another for everyone else, so unless it involved driving up to Durham for eye tests it was time to rein in our libertarian instincts.

    These restrictions could last for up to six months, Boris added. Which immediately raised eyebrows on both sides of the Commons. Because the prime minister’s idea of time rarely coincides with anyone else’s. It was Boris who had initially said the worst of the pandemic would be over in 12 weeks. It was Boris who had said we should be back to normal by Christmas. Now he was saying we were in for another half-year. Which probably meant that you could probably double it. Maybe he was thinking of Christmas 2021.

    The pandemic has highlighted the stark difference between Boristime and Coronatime. Because he is unable to treat the country as grownups and can’t handle being the bearer of bad news, Boris invariably shortens any given Covid timeframe. Years become months, months become weeks. Meanwhile Coronatime has the last laugh of turning each of his strategies from months into weeks and weeks into days. You sometimes can’t even tell if one of his promises is going to last till the end of a sentence.

    If Keir Starmer was put out that his powerful virtual conference speech had been all but forgotten by lunchtime he showed no sign of it. Rather he maintained his familiar tactic of broadly supporting the government’s new measures, before pointing out some of their more obvious shortcomings. Were there any signs that localised lockdowns were proving effective? What financial support was he planning to offer for jobs and businesses affected by the new restrictions? And whatever had happened to the world-beating test-and-trace system that everyone had agreed was essential to containing the virus?

    Mostly, though, Boris’s concentration was focused on keeping his own backbenchers happy, as half of them want to avoid any further restrictions to keep the economy open and half have genuine concerns that the party will not be forgiven if the death toll in the second wave matches or exceeds that of the first one. And by and large he succeeded in treading an uneasy balance between being too bullish and too pragmatic. Up until the end, that is. Then his natural enthusiasm got the better of him. The ludicrous £100bn “Operation Moonshot” was still on course and with any luck everything would be fine within a matter of a few months.

    We were back on Boristime. Though not for long, as moments after he had finished speaking Nicola Sturgeon made her own statement to the Scottish parliament. Where Boris had sounded somewhat rambling and, at times, contradictory, in his statement, Nicola was a model of clarity and precision. She has a clear grasp of her priorities and sticks to them. She had listened to the advice of Whitty and Vallance and concluded it was necessary to go a lot further than England. In Scotland the “rule of six” was a goner, and there would be no unnecessary socialising between families indoors for the foreseeable future.

    With Northern Ireland having already reached a similar conclusion, that left Boris as something of an outlier. Already people were taking bets that his new restrictions would have to be updated within a week. In the battle between Boristime and Coronatime, there’s so far only ever been one winner.

    It's Boristime v Coronatime, and there’s only ever one winner | John Crace | Politics | The Guardian

  21. #446
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    Quote Originally Posted by cyrille View Post
    Some men are born mediocre. Some achieve mediocrity. Others have mediocrity thrust upon them. In 1940 we had Winston Churchill. In 2020 we have Boris Johnson, a man who believes himself to be Churchill’s reincarnation, but is nothing more than a poundshop imitation.

    Where to start with the prime minister’s TV address to the nation? The trademark smirk? The nervous hand gestures? The fact he thinks he’s fighting a war, not a pandemic? Or just the brazen cheek as Boris tried to claim the credit for what he called the stunning triumph over the coronavirus so far? The 50,000 dead and the endless screw-ups of his own government, from care homes to test and trace, were simply airbrushed out of history. The prime minister is not just a man without quality. He is a man without shame.

    All this was just a warm up for the grandiose announcement of a few extra restrictions that had already been announced and would almost certainly prove to be insufficient to cope with the second wave. Boris apologised for the new measures, though he laid the blame squarely on the British people for not having been able to abide by the existing measures. Perhaps he should have run that line past Dominic Cummings who set an example so many followed.

    “Never in our history has our collective destiny and our collective health depended so completely on our individual behaviour,” he said, winding up the Churchill rhetoric. “There are unquestionably difficult months to come. And the fight against Covid is by no means over. I have no doubt, however, that there are great days ahead. But now is the time for us all to summon the discipline, and the resolve, and the spirit of togetherness that will carry us through.” Qualities that have yet to be found in Johnson.

    It had been much the same story in the Commons earlier in the day and you had to feel for Chris Whitty and Patrick Vallance, who must now be wondering why they had gone to so much trouble the previous day to explain just how critical the coronavirus rates of infection had become and that the threat had now risen back to level four. For after a few token nods to the gravity of the situation – “a stitch in time saves nine” – Boris Johnson used his commons statement to introduce a few minor tweaks to lockdown restrictions that rather suggested he wasn’t too bothered.

    He wanted schools, colleges, universities and businesses to remain open – with the one proviso that all those he had previously threatened with the sack if they didn’t go back to work were now advised to work from home if at all possible. His biggest change was that pubs, restaurants and bars should now all close at 10pm – it has apparently been proved that the coronavirus is mainly a nocturnal creature and is most contagious after dark – though people were obviously free to go home in groups of six, get totally hammered and infect one another afterwards.

    Like most Johnson statements it felt rather as if it had been written on the fly. By a committee of his left and right brain, with little synaptic contact between the two. There were few attempts to explain the situation carefully and carry the country with him. Just a load of off the cuff measures – mandatory face masks for shop and hospitality workers etc – and the threat of stricter measures to come if people didn’t comply or the restrictions proved ineffective.

    This time he was really, really serious, he said, trying not to smirk. He understood that, unlike the Hun, we Brits were too freedom loving to comply with every law – nothing to do with the government’s mixed messaging obviously – but there were limits. There was nothing the public liked less than one law for the powerful and another for everyone else, so unless it involved driving up to Durham for eye tests it was time to rein in our libertarian instincts.

    These restrictions could last for up to six months, Boris added. Which immediately raised eyebrows on both sides of the Commons. Because the prime minister’s idea of time rarely coincides with anyone else’s. It was Boris who had initially said the worst of the pandemic would be over in 12 weeks. It was Boris who had said we should be back to normal by Christmas. Now he was saying we were in for another half-year. Which probably meant that you could probably double it. Maybe he was thinking of Christmas 2021.

    The pandemic has highlighted the stark difference between Boristime and Coronatime. Because he is unable to treat the country as grownups and can’t handle being the bearer of bad news, Boris invariably shortens any given Covid timeframe. Years become months, months become weeks. Meanwhile Coronatime has the last laugh of turning each of his strategies from months into weeks and weeks into days. You sometimes can’t even tell if one of his promises is going to last till the end of a sentence.

    If Keir Starmer was put out that his powerful virtual conference speech had been all but forgotten by lunchtime he showed no sign of it. Rather he maintained his familiar tactic of broadly supporting the government’s new measures, before pointing out some of their more obvious shortcomings. Were there any signs that localised lockdowns were proving effective? What financial support was he planning to offer for jobs and businesses affected by the new restrictions? And whatever had happened to the world-beating test-and-trace system that everyone had agreed was essential to containing the virus?

    Mostly, though, Boris’s concentration was focused on keeping his own backbenchers happy, as half of them want to avoid any further restrictions to keep the economy open and half have genuine concerns that the party will not be forgiven if the death toll in the second wave matches or exceeds that of the first one. And by and large he succeeded in treading an uneasy balance between being too bullish and too pragmatic. Up until the end, that is. Then his natural enthusiasm got the better of him. The ludicrous £100bn “Operation Moonshot” was still on course and with any luck everything would be fine within a matter of a few months.

    We were back on Boristime. Though not for long, as moments after he had finished speaking Nicola Sturgeon made her own statement to the Scottish parliament. Where Boris had sounded somewhat rambling and, at times, contradictory, in his statement, Nicola was a model of clarity and precision. She has a clear grasp of her priorities and sticks to them. She had listened to the advice of Whitty and Vallance and concluded it was necessary to go a lot further than England. In Scotland the “rule of six” was a goner, and there would be no unnecessary socialising between families indoors for the foreseeable future.

    With Northern Ireland having already reached a similar conclusion, that left Boris as something of an outlier. Already people were taking bets that his new restrictions would have to be updated within a week. In the battle between Boristime and Coronatime, there’s so far only ever been one winner.

    It's Boristime v Coronatime, and there’s only ever one winner | John Crace | Politics | The Guardian
    brilliant piece from The Guardian, as usual

  22. #447
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    It's the only news source Cryall quotes the feckless, imbecile.

    Still he's our TD village idiot

  23. #448
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    Our survey. Under one in three Party members think Johnson is dealing well with the Coronavirus as Prime Minister.

    We’ve been asking this question for the last seven months in the monthly survey. And this is the seventh time in a row that it has fallen.

    For the record, the percentage believing that he has dealt with Covid-19 well have been as follows since March: 92 per cent, 84 per cent, 72 per cent, 64 per cent, 59 per cent, 48 per cent – and now 28 per cent.

    So only between a third and a quarter of Party activist members of our panel believe that the Prime Minister is handling the crisis well, and the best part of two in three think he’s handling it badly.

    The percentage thinking that the Government has handled the virus well is slightly higher at 32 per cent, but the difference is so small as to be minimal.

    Three quick points.

    First, this dire rating will be the product of a mix of factors: weariness with restrictions, exasperation with what seem to be bewildering and unpredictable rules, and a sense that the Government has no agreed plan.

    Second, the Prime Minister’s survey scores were always likely to yo-yo. We sometimes write when a politician scores well in the surveys that what goes up must sooner or later come down. But the reverse often applies too.

    Third, this is almost exactly the same panel that gave Johnson a 93 per cent approval rating in the wake of last year’s general election – and a 92 per cent positive rating on this question last March, as we have seen.

    Talking of what’s going up – or rather staying up – 83 per cent of respondents back Rishi Sunak’s plans. His scores for the last three months have been 82 per cent and 81 per cent, and have never dropped below 71 per cent.

    These are bleak ratings for Johnson as the virtual Conservative Party Conference prepares to open tomorrow.

    Our survey. Under one in three Party members think Johnson is dealing well with the Coronavirus as Prime Minister. | Conservative Home

  24. #449
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    Here's your reward for voting Tory, you dumb suckers! More broken promises!

    One in three 'red wall' families £1,000 a year worse off under Tory plans
    Universal credit benefit rate cut would disproportionately affect areas PM pledged to ‘level up’

    One in three working-age families in so-called “red wall” constituencies won by the Tories from Labour at the last election will be £1,000 a year worse off if government plans to cut universal credit benefit rates go ahead.


    The potentially dramatic impact on low-income households’ in “left behind” former industrial areas in the north of England, Midlands, Northern Ireland and Wales is highlighted in an analysis by the Resolution Foundation thinktank.


    The hit would fall disproportionately on families in areas the government has promised to “level up” economically. These include 62% of working-age households in Blackpool South, and 44% in Great Grimsby, Birmingham Northfield and West Bromwich West.


    By contrast the percentage of working-age families affected by the cut in non-red wall Conservative seats is 24%. “You are 50% more likely to lose out in the red wall regions than in the south-east [of England],” the analysis says.


    The cut, which would affect 6m households across the UK, would take £20 a week off the basic allowances for universal credit and tax credits, and is predicted to push an estimated 700,000 households into poverty at a time of rising unemployment.

    One in three 'red wall' families PS1,000 a year worse off under Tory plans | Universal credit | The Guardian

  25. #450
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    His decision to cause further damage to the UK over the worthless fishing industry boggles the mind.

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