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Thread: Eurasia Topics

  1. #1376
    Thailand Expat harrybarracuda's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by OhOh View Post
    Your noun was "toys". One can include anything that meets the "toy" definition.
    Yes one can, including the nuclear toys with which the Iranians have been dabbling these past few years.

    If one isn't a stupid little pedant.

  2. #1377
    Neo Cameralist Backspin's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by harrybarracuda View Post
    Eurotrash buying chinky crap.

    It's a marriage made in heaven.

    Seppo trade built modern China. It was decided by the Clinton admin

  3. #1378
    Neo Cameralist Backspin's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by harrybarracuda View Post
    Which confirms exactly why the EU should not become dependent on Russian gas.

    Not for Seppo's to decide.

  4. #1379
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    Quote Originally Posted by Backspin View Post
    Not for Seppo's to decide.
    Whoosh. (that’s the sound of you, missing the advent of globalization).

    Everything has global consequences these days, even your louche stupidity unfortunately, clutching at straws.

  5. #1380
    Hansum Man! panama hat's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Switch View Post
    Everything has global consequences these days, even your louche stupidity unfortunately, clutching at straws.
    Skidmark posting Canada, read by people in Indonesia, NZ, Thailand, the US, Aus, the UK etc...

    Let's see if he understands that

  6. #1381
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    Quote Originally Posted by Switch View Post
    Everything has global consequences these days
    Countries deliver their promises to their electorate, in theory.

    There is no global entity or gang who has/have the power to deliver the desires of a particular counties citizens.

  7. #1382
    Thailand Expat harrybarracuda's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by OhOh View Post
    Countries deliver their promises to their electorate, in theory.

    There is no global entity or gang who has/have the power to deliver the desires of a particular counties citizens.
    No there isn't but the consequences of the EU relying too heavily on the untrustworthy Russians for their energy supply would have an impact across the globe if the switch was turned off. Starting with trade.

  8. #1383
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    Quote Originally Posted by harrybarracuda View Post
    No there isn't but the consequences of the EU relying too heavily on the untrustworthy Russians for their energy supply would have an impact across the globe if the switch was turned off. Starting with trade.
    "Starting with trade"?
    The Russians have stopped a trade? Perhaps they imposed sanctions on ...?

    if the switch was turned off.
    As I recall (harry obviously not) the switch was turned off (to the lines supplying EU) by Ukrainians, the friends of EU (and others) who are generously paid for the transit. That's why the new pipelines are bypassing the friends - and they are not happy...

    untrustworthy Russians
    Why not to rely on other trustworthy sources (across the globe), e.g. in Texas?

  9. #1384
    Hansum Man! panama hat's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Klondyke View Post
    The Russians have stopped a trade?
    English . . . really. Do try.

  10. #1385
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    The zen of Ladakh disengagement

    February 21, 2021 by M. K. BHADRAKUMAR


    Eurasia Topics-china-jpg

    A meeting between special representatives of India and China on boundary question – Ajit Doval (L) and Wang Yi (R) – is on the cards

    "The 9th round of talks at the army commanders’ level between India and China resulted in a breakthrough that since achieved the successful disengagement of troops on the north and south banks of Pangong Tso in eastern Ladakh.
    This in turn provided the ambience for the 10th round of talks that began yesterday, which would presumably address disengagement elsewhere in Ladakh as well as patrolling issues in Depsang.

    The breakthrough at Pangong Tso was a good thing to happen — as also its efficient implementation by the two armies ‘in a phased, coordinated and verified manner.’ It must be savoured as a net gain on the road to peace.


    But, curiously, the opposite seems to be happening. The reduction of military tensions in Pangong Tso has become a matter of heartburn for sections of the media and the fraternity of India’s ‘China hands’ — and possibly, hawkish elements within the establishment — who scoff at the very notion of peaceful resolution of territorial differences with China now or ever.


    The current border talks are highly sensitive. It is the government’s prerogative to decide on a negotiating strategy and to choreograph the way forward. This strategy would have a short term and long term perspective as well as a ‘big picture’. Indeed, the government takes the public into confidence when an occasion demands it but the negotiations per se should be conducted in secrecy.

    Yet, what we see is a calibrated attempt to debunk the negotiating brief — and its outcome so far — with a view to discredit, demoralise and derail the process itself. Thus, misgivings are being aired over the incremental approach toward disengagement.

    But, what is the alternative? A ‘whole-or-nothing’ approach? A ‘take-it-or-leave-it’ approach? Now, what if a ‘package deal’ takes long to reach — and what happens in the meantime? There are no easy answers.


    Another pinprick is about the setting up of buffer zones to separate the two armies. Surely, if peace and tranquility are desired objectives in the short and medium term, buffer zones offer an optimal interim arrangement.


    Modern armies have the technical capability to monitor closely, constantly and reliably to ensure that buffer zones remain what they are — namely, ‘no-man’s land’ where neither side patrols or creates new facts on the ground under the pretext of ‘infrastructure development’.


    Indeed, buffer zones are without prejudice to each side’s respective territorial claims. Principally, they eliminate the risk of ugly brawls between patrolling parties as has been happening in obscure circumstances in those remote mountains in Ladakh that are beyond public scrutiny.


    Equally, there is angst that buffer zones signify a departure from the ‘status quo ante’ (that is, positions prior to April 2020.) Pray, what difference does it make when it concerns disputed territory — and, LAC itself is notional, to say the least?


    In fact, candid discussions are needed regarding the so-called ‘1993 agreement’, which was never delineated on maps or delimited on the ground — how in the durbar culture in Delhi, bureaucrats produced a rabbit out of the hat in the run-up to a rare prime ministerial visit to China. The problem with gratuitous, self-serving accounts is that they inevitably create misperceptions and fuel disjointed assumptions in the downstream.


    Clearly, the government has prioritised the restoration of peace and tranquility. This is understandable when the country can ill afford to risk armed conflict on the border, what with the daunting magnitude of the pandemic stalking vast swathes of land, the post-pandemic economic recovery, and the spectre of resource crunch.

    Anything beyond peace and tranquility is not within the realms of possibility. The one lesson borne out of Doklam standoff in 2017 is that India should not overreach. We intervened to stop road construction on Bhutanese territory disputed by China, and the PLA eventually returned to build roads and infrastructure in other areas of the same region.

    It is presumptuous to dictate negotiating strategy from the sidelines to an elected government. Even a minority government like UPA-1 pushed through the nuclear deal with the US — which it unilaterally decided to be in the country’s ‘enlightened national interest’ — although, in retrospect, it remains unimplemented and, perhaps, unimplementable.

    Even its masons and carpenters no longer want to claim it as personal legacy.


    Nonetheless, the country accepted the 2008 nuclear deal and moved on, since it was a legitimate decision by an elected government. To stretch the analogy further, even as the 2008 nuclear deal opened the pathway for India-US military cooperation, no one should presuppose at this point in time that the disengagement on the disputed border in eastern Ladakh and the restoration of peace and tranquility is an end in itself. Far from it.


    Conceivably, if peace and tranquility on the border becomes sustainable, there could be positive fallouts on India-China trade and economic ties, where there is much complementarity between the two economies.


    Basically, the government should pay much greater attention to geo-economics as the locomotive of its diplomacy and foreign policy. Energy is being squandered away in vainglorious projects such as QUAD without commensurate returns. Make no mistake, all great powers in history also happened to be robust, successful trading nations first.


    The words of the American astronaut Neil Armstrong come to mind. While putting his left foot on the lunar surface in the morning of 20th July 1969, Armstrong famously declared, ‘That’s one small step for man, one giant leap for mankind.’


    Who knows, the moment of truth in Ladakh may also augur for a giant leap toward boundary settlement with China in the fulness of time. The news that the special representatives of the two countries are planning to meet gives a positive signal."


    The zen of Ladakh disengagement - Indian Punchline
    A tray full of GOLD is not worth a moment in time.

  11. #1386
    Thailand Expat harrybarracuda's Avatar
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    This boy loves kissing the chinky arse doesn't he?

  12. #1387
    Hansum Man! panama hat's Avatar
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    You mean Badrahkumar or OhNo?

    It's cute, though, how he latches onto the few who support his love of the totalitarian regime and goes with it.

  13. #1388
    Thailand Expat harrybarracuda's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by panama hat View Post
    You mean Badrahkumar or OhNo?

    It's cute, though, how he latches onto the few who support his love of the totalitarian regime and goes with it.
    There's no doubt from the shite he churns out that this particular wobbly is on the chinky or russian payroll.

  14. #1389
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    China-EU investment deal more vital than FTA

    By Yi Xiong | China Daily | Updated: 2021-02-22 07:14

    "The Comprehensive Agreement on Investment, once inked by the European Union and China, will become an important milestone for the two major economies. To some extent, the CAI, on which the two sides wrapped up negotiations on Dec 30, can be considered more important than a trade agreement for the EU.

    We (at Deutsche Bank) believe the CAI will likely boost EU investment in China. For EU manufacturers, China's move to further widen market access and remove shareholding limits will likely help create new opportunities and build a level playing field for domestic and foreign investors. Perhaps the service sector can be expected to make even greater progress after the two sides sign the agreement.

    EU subsidiaries in China accounted for 11 percent of the total manufacturing sales, but only 3 percent of services sales of EU subsidiaries worldwide. By further opening up China's financial and information technology services-as well as promising sectors such as environment and health services-to European investment, the CAI will help increase EU subsidiaries' services sales in China.

    Although the details of the Sino-EU investment agreement are yet to be revealed, our confidence in the CAI and in China's commitment to further opening up its economy is based on the strength and soundness of the Chinese economy. Further opening-up, as China's recent economic history suggests, will not weaken China's economic competitiveness, but instead benefit all participants in the economy.

    China and the EU are already one of the world's biggest trading partners. The EU has long been China's top trading partner, and in 2020 China became the EU's top trading partner. Which means the volume of Sino-EU trade has, for the first time, surpassed that of EU-US trade.

    But trade does not reflect the full picture of EU-China economic relations. Between 2000 and 2019, Europe's gross foreign direct investment in China, according to the International Monetary Fund's Coordinated Direct Investment Survey, was $254 billion. Yet the figure likely underestimates the true value of European investments in China, especially because EU subsidiaries' aggregate sales are already higher than EU exports to China. And the gap has widened with the EU subsidiaries sales growing faster than exports over the years.

    EU manufacturers have invested in a wide range of industries in China. The automobile industry, not surprisingly, is the top sector for them. Even so, the auto industry accounted for just about a quarter of total sales of EU subsidiaries in China's manufacturing sector. EU manufacturers also have a substantial presence in China's chemicals and machinery industries, which have annual turnovers close to €30 billion ($36.24 billion) each. And sales of the electronics, metals and food/beverage sectors have all exceeded€10 billion.

    China's investment in the EU was relatively small until 2010, but it has increased rapidly since then. The sales of Chinese manufacturing subsidiaries in the EU increased from €8 billion in 2010 to €54 billion in 2017. Similarly, the sales of the subsidiaries of Chinese service enterprises in the EU increased from €1 billion in 2010 to €18 billion in 2017. This rapid increase can be attributed to the expansion of many Chinese companies in the EU through mergers and acquisitions.

    Chinese foreign direct investment in Europe peaked in 2017 only to decline later. But despite Chinese investments in Europe slowing in the short term, they will likely grow in the long run, as Chinese companies are motivated to expand their businesses in the EU, according to a 2019 survey by the China Chamber of Commerce to the EU.

    And although the EU has promised to open up its renewable energy sector to a limited extent, with reportedly a 5 percent shareholding cap, it will be welcomed by Chinese investors, not least because it is the right move toward greater Sino-EU collaboration on the crucial issue of fighting climate change."


    The author is Deutsche Bank Chief Economist, China. The views do not necessarily reflect those of China Daily.



    https://www.chinadaily.com.cn/a/2021...d0baaa07e.html

  15. #1390
    Thailand Expat harrybarracuda's Avatar
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    Banks don't give a fuck where they make their money. They just want to be part of the flow, even if it ends up being one way traffic from Europe to Chinastan.

  16. #1391
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    Quote Originally Posted by harrybarracuda View Post
    Banks don't give a fuck where they make their money. They just want to be part of the flow, even if it ends up being one way traffic from Europe to Chinastan.
    All banks? Surely not, there are some good ones, aren't they harry?

  17. #1392
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    India, Pakistan agree to stop cross-border firing in Kashmir

    In a rare move, India and Pakistan agree to ‘strict observance’ of ceasefire along the de facto border in disputed Kashmir.

    By Asad Hashim and Rifat Fareed

    25 Feb 2021

    "Pakistan and India’s militaries have agreed to strictly observe a ceasefire at the de facto border between the two countries in the disputed region of Kashmir, and other agreements, according to a Pakistani military statement – a rare thaw in relations between the South Asian neighbours.

    The directors-general of military operations (DGMO) of the Indian and Pakistani militaries held discussions over a hotline between their offices on Thursday morning, a Pakistani military statement said.

    “Both sides agreed for strict observance of all agreements, understandings and cease firing along the [Line of Control] and all other sectors, with effect from midnight [on Friday],” said the statement.


    The statement said talks were held “in a free, frank and cordial atmosphere” between the armies of the two nuclear-armed countries.

    A ceasefire has been in place at the Line of Control (LoC), which divides Indian-administered and Pakistan-administered Kashmir, since 2003, but it is frequently violated by both sides, resulting in civilian and military casualties.

    Last year, Indian small arms, and mortar fire and artillery shells killed at least 28 civilians and wounded 257 more in Pakistan-administered Kashmir, according to Pakistan’s foreign office.


    Since January 1, Pakistan says Indian forces have violated the ceasefire at least 175 times, wounding eight civilians.

    In 2020, Pakistan violated the ceasefire along the LoC at least 5,133 times, resulting in 22 civilians and 24 soldiers being killed, as well as 197 injuries, according to India’s home affairs ministry.


    Mehbooba Mufti, former chief minister Indian-administered Kashmir region, welcomed the ceasefire announcement, saying “the two countries should also initiate a political dialogue and reconciliation to bring peace in Kashmir”.

    “The ceasefire violations create a lot of destruction. We see people getting killed everyday, be it police, army men, rebels or civilians. There is a need to end this bloodshed,” she told Al Jazeera.


    But the residents in the Himalayan region are skeptical.


    Jibran Ahmad, 29-year-old research scholar in the main city of Srinagar, told Al Jazeera the two countries should ” take steps to bring peace in a real sense”.

    “We have seen these farce statements before as well,” Ahmad said. “The point is the two countries do not care about the lives of common people in Kashmir. They take a step only when it suits them but we have not seen any real peace so far.”

    Security expert Parvin Sawhney told Al Jazeera “political will is the problem on both sides”.

    “[The] issue is we have done this before, we have structured hotline talks before, we have done confidence-building measures and all these things are as good as the political will that backs them,” he said.
    “Everything is about trust, and for that, you have to start talking at the highest level.”

    India and Pakistan have fought three full-scale wars and several smaller conflicts since they gained independence from the British in 1947. Two of those three wars were over the region of Kashmir, which both claim in full but administer separate portions of.


    Relations have come to a standstill since February 2019, when India accused a Pakistan-based armed group of carrying out an attack that killed more than 30 Indian security personnel in the Indian-administered Kashmir town of Pulwama.


    India carried out an air raid on Pakistani soil days later, resulting in retaliatory attacks by Pakistan and an aerial dogfight that saw at least one Indian fighter jet shot down by Pakistan.


    Hostilities cooled after Pakistan returned the pilot of that aircraft, but relations have remained frozen. India accuses Pakistan of supporting armed groups that target Indian security forces in Kashmir and elsewhere, while Pakistan has made the same allegation against India’s intelligence service regarding attacks by armed groups on Pakistani soil.


    Late last year, Pakistan upped the temperature of the rhetoric, saying it had “credible evidence” that India was preparing for a repeat of the 2019 air raids, a month after it shared intelligence information that it said linked India to attacks in Pakistan.


    India’s foreign ministry said Pakistan’s accusations “enjoy no credibility, are fabricated and represent figments of imagination”.

    In an exclusive interview with Al Jazeera in January, Pakistani Foreign Minister Shah Mehmood Qureshi said the “onus” of restarting talks was on India, demanding that security and constitutional measures that New Delhi had taken in Kashmir be reversed."

    India, Pakistan agree to stop cross-border firing in Kashmir | India News | Al Jazeera

  18. #1393
    Thailand Expat harrybarracuda's Avatar
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    This Covid shit has some positive effects eh?

    Any chance the bacon sarnies want some of those Indian vaccines?

  19. #1394
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    Colombo port deal calms India’s paranoia

    March 3, 2021 by M. K. BHADRAKUMAR

    The Sri Lankan government has announced that it is going ahead with a project to develop jointly with India and Japan a new container terminal from the scratch at Colombo Port called the West Container Terminal.

    According to the official notification of the Sri Lankan cabinet decision on March1 in this regard, the project will be “on Build, Operate and Transfer basis for a period of 35 years as a public-private partnership with Adani Ports and Special Economic Zone Limited [APSEZ Consortium] and its local representative John Keels Holding PLC [APSEZ Consortium], and the Sri Lanka Ports Authority.”

    The Sri Lankan Cabinet has appointed a Negotiation Committee and a Project Committee to evaluate the proposal in this regard. According to the Cabinet notification in Colombo, the proposal has been forwarded to the Indian and Japanese diplomatic missions in Colombo “requesting them to nominate investors.” This appears to be a mere formality.

    For, the announcement in Colombo says that the proposal, which has been prepared by the Adani consortium, “has been approved by the Indian High Commission,” while Tokyo is yet to name an investor.


    From all reports, this appears to be a much bigger project than the $700 million East Container Terminal expansion project that Delhi and Tokyo had canvassed for earlier. Importantly, the Indian and Japanese investors will be allowed 85 percent stake. This will be, interestingly, exactly on par with the holding of the Chinese company that is building the mega Colombo International Container Terminal.

    The development at once puts India’s ‘Colombo watchers’ in a quandary. They will have to go back to the abacus and do their additions and subtractions all over again. Evidently, neither has China acted as a ‘spoiler’ to ward off Indian presence in Sri Lanka nor is Sri Lanka a vassal state of the Chinese Communist Party. Put differently, the geopolitics of Sri Lanka needs fresh thinking by Indian strategists.

    For a start, the Sri Lankan government wants India to be a stakeholder in their country’s growth and development. Having said that, it is also a smart decision on their part to involve a hugely influential Indian company with enormous clout with the ruling elites in Delhi to develop a vested interest in the stability and predictability of Indian policies toward Sri Lanka in the medium and long term.

    Considering that the Adani Group is also constructing a project in the southern tip of India for the development of a greenfield port at Vizhinjam (Thiruvananthapuram) — the International Deepwater Multipurpose Seaport — Colombo is also ensuring that there won’t be any conflict of business interests in container and other cargo shipping.

    No doubt, this new development devolving upon the Sri Lankan offer of a big port deal for Indian investment at a site literally next door to the massive Colombo Port City project being executed by China Merchants Port Holdings Company Limited (with an estimated $15 billion outlay) underscores that countries such as Sri Lanka (or Nepal) have a mind of their own and will always exercise strategic autonomy to preserve their core interests and concerns and safeguard their sovereignty.

    On the other hand, a stable relationship can be developed with a country such as Sri Lanka only on the basis of mutual interest and mutual respect. Simply put, India should scrupulously avoid the manipulative policies such as interference in the internal affairs of the neighbouring countries, leave alone conspire to bring about ‘regime change’.

    In fact, imagine Colombo’s comfort level today if only India had taken a forthright position extending rock solid support to Sri Lanka (as China did) in pushing back at the recent US-backed move in the UNHRC to blackmail the leadership in Colombo over alleged war crimes.

    Equally, it emerges that while India’s joint ventures with the US in Sri Lankan politics have failed to produce durable results, and pushing the Indo-Pacific concept in South Asia can only trigger resistance, India’s core interests can be safeguarded by Delhi on its own steam. In retrospect, the visit by NSA Ajit Doval to Colombo (November 27-28, 2021) and his talks with the Sri Lankan leadership has proved to be a turning point.

    Colombo watches Indian developments closely and would have sensed by now the calibrated distancing Delhi is putting vis-a-vis the Quad and the Indo-Pacific concept in the most recent period in the post-Trump era, whose ripple effects are already being felt to an extent in the climate of the Sino-Indian relationship.

    Clearly, Delhi needs to reset its ‘red lines’. The bottom line is that India has vital security interests in its immediate neighbourhood and would expect Colombo to be sensitive toward such concerns. Now, having said that, there is no conceivable reason to feel paranoid about it either.

    Colombo is a brilliant practitioner of diplomacy — perhaps, the best among all South Asian countries — and will never surrender its strategic autonomy. Delhi should place trust in Colombo’s goodwill and consistency as a close friendly neighbour.

    On the other hand, China too has legitimate interests in developing friendly relations and partnership with Sri Lanka. Commensurate with its rise as a global power, China will pursue its interests and it is unrealistic on India’s part to define their parameters. Thus, the clumsy, knee jerk reaction to a Chinese contractor executing a $12 million hybrid wind and solar energy project off Jaffna was entirely avoidable. It didn’t exactly present the image of a self-assured nation. And, come to think of it, this wasn’t even a Chinese project, strictly speaking — but funded by ADB where the Quad countries hold over 43% shares as against a paltry 6% by China.

    Arguably, the time has come for Delhi to take Beijing at its word and wet its toes by testing the efficacy of the tantalising idea of ‘China-India Plus’.

    China is known to be innovative in its business partnerships abroad."



    https://www.indianpunchline.com/colo...dias-paranoia/

  20. #1395
    Member Wakey's Avatar
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    I don't understand the title thread. Is it about anything that happens on the planet's largest landmass that stretches from Paris to Johor?

  21. #1396
    Thailand Expat harrybarracuda's Avatar
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    Nah it's just a convenient place for Hoohoo to drop his waffle.

  22. #1397
    Hansum Man! panama hat's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wakey View Post
    I don't understand the title thread. Is it about anything that happens on the planet's largest landmass that stretches from Paris to Johor?
    Like Harry said - this is OhNo's and Klondyke's private playground for more of their anti-western agit-prop

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    Canadian Hypocrisy Shines Embarrassingly With New Accusations of China’s Muslim Genocide


    Moved to MK's existing thread:

    Quote Originally Posted by OhOh View Post
    Canadian Hypocrisy Shines Embarrassingly With New Accusations of China’s Muslim Genocide
    My apologies.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Eurasia Topics-me03032102-jpg  
    Last edited by OhOh; 04-03-2021 at 04:13 PM.

  24. #1399
    Thailand Expat harrybarracuda's Avatar
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    China has managed to both find a sustainable cure for terrorism
    By locking up an entire population who are not terrorists.

    I'm sure hoohoo would be ecstatic if the Thais decided to lock up him and the entire population of rural Thailand because it would solve the southern terrorist problem at a stroke.

  25. #1400
    Thailand Expat harrybarracuda's Avatar
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    Chinky bastards at it again.

    As concerns about nation-state threat activity around the world continue to increase, a new report by Recorded Future has identified a previously unknown threat group attacking critical infrastructure.
    A China-linked
    advanced persistent threat (APT) group dubbed "RedEcho" has been targeting India's power sector, according to research released Sunday by Recorded Future's Insikt Group. According to the report, the newly identified actor is conducting multiple intrusions against Indian critical power infrastructure, acting as potential "pre-positioning" for future escalation.
    Chinese threat group 'RedEcho' targeting Indian power grid

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