Page 26 of 29 FirstFirst ... 16181920212223242526272829 LastLast
Results 626 to 650 of 717

Thread: Eurasia Topics

  1. #626
    Thailand Expat
    OhOh's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Last Online
    Today @ 09:59 PM
    Location
    Where troubles melt like lemon drops
    Posts
    20,174
    International Life after the Pandemic

    23.06.2020

    "The 2020 pandemic has marked a turning point in many processes: globalization, regionalization, and the struggle of nation-states for survival. Many had expected something like this, and the reaction of states and societies to the new virus was unexpectedly strong and profound. Under the slogan of combating the epidemic, many countries started doing openly what they had wanted to do for a long time: closing borders, strengthening sovereignty, bringing back production operations from abroad, and shifting relations with neighbors to a bilateral footing.



    The coronavirus pandemic has coincided with a global economic crisis, but this time around it is not just a financial crunch, but a real economic slump. Conditions have emerged for a perfect storm in international affairs: the epidemic is forcing countries to hold aloof and become self-sufficient as much as possible. The economic crisis will expose an urgent need for economic recovery, especially new jobs, but this will have to be done amid acute international competition rather than broad international cooperation. Let us not forget about the numerous sanctions currently in effect. In the absence of a universally recognized international hegemon (leader)—the U.S. is no longer at the helm, while China is not there yet—one can expect an end of cooperation in many areas, a global economic recession, and more conflicts. It seems that the starting point of many processes will be the contraction of world trade due to its securitization, that is, the growing understanding that it is not only an economic but also a political phenomenon that has a significant impact on national security and the internal stability of states.




    Trade

    If the governments of leading states draw the right conclusions, they will give priority to the self-reliance of their states in critical areas, paying less and less attention to foreign trade. This is not the last pandemic to come, and as experience has shown, it is impossible to rely entirely on the international division of labor, hence trade. What is the point of making the production of medical masks or drugs more cost-effective by moving it to other countries if, in the event of a crisis, supplies become blocked either because their production abroad has been halted or because trade routes have been closed? Naturally, global trade will not stop completely, but it will inevitably shrink. This includes not only trade in goods and services, but also international investment and technology transfer. The decline in trade will have serious ideological and political consequences.
    Investments

    Direct investment will fall for the same reasons that global trade will decline. Speculative capital will undoubtedly continue to move around the world, although some national restrictions are possible, similar to those imposed during the crisis of 2008. In recent decades, direct investment has largely served the purpose of international division of labor by using relative advantages of individual countries for global production, such as low labor costs, availability of raw materials, or convenient geographical location. But the securitization of foreign trade due to the pandemic and the general rise of economic nationalism due to the crisis (reshoring, that is, return of production and creation of jobs at home) will force many global companies to revise their investment plans. Their governments will convincingly convey their views to them. Needless to say, direct investment in the production of goods for local markets will remain attractive.
    International Monetary System

    As global trade declines, so will the demand for international currency, mostly the U.S. dollar which services this trade. If the volume of trade and investment transactions within the national economy exceeds the volume of foreign trade operations, the national currency will be in greater demand than the world currency. It addition, most growing economies, such as BRICS countries, are likely to focus on solving domestic problems and moderate their efforts to reform the world monetary system.
    The dollar will not disappear and the world monetary system will not be overhauled, but international monetary cooperation will weaken.

    The issue of trust will come to the fore. Everyone trusted the dollar in the era of cooperation, but will this trust hold in the new conditions?


    Intellectual Property

    The policy of protecting intellectual property implemented worldwide since the 1990s by developed countries that produce it will be eroded. Countries that use intellectual property have never been interested in observing the global protection regime and will simply take advantage of the situation.
    Firstly, their economies will focus more on the domestic market, and legitimate intellectual property owners will lose some leverage which they could use before to protect their markets from “counterfeit” products.
    Secondly, the possession of critical technologies becomes a key national security factor: if a country needs a vaccine to protect its people and its cost is high, it will be stolen. The same applies to other high-tech products and processes.
    Thirdly, the global intellectual property regime was based on the leading role of international institutions, such as the WTO, and on the unity of producer countries. But now the WTO is likely to go into an even deeper crisis and producer countries will show less solidarity, with dissidence and opportunism blossoming among them, thus giving consuming countries an extra chance.
    Global Institutions

    Unlike during the 2008 financial crisis, global, regional, and international institutions such as the G20, the European Union, and OPEC have acted negatively, poorly, or not acted at all. They may become more active later when the world economy starts recovering from the crisis, but not yet. The role of such a specific institution as the global leadership (hegemony) of the United States, unquestionable until recently, is also unobservable. America is preoccupied with its own problems, and while in the recent past it formed international coalitions to fight Ebola, today it is trying to buy other countries’ coronavirus vaccine projects for itself.
    The weakening of world institutions and the multilateral regime, which can hardly pass unnoticed, is also pushing states towards a strategy of self-sufficiency, including in the economy.
    Migration

    The idea of an open world community free of national borders was badly shaken by the migration crisis of 2015. Faced with the pandemic, most nation-states have completely closed their borders to foreigners and will reopen them slowly and reluctantly. Most likely, many countries will introduce permanent medical control requirements for visitors, which will complicate travel and make it more costly.
    Refugees and economic migrants can now be denied entry not because the local population is against them, but because migrants have no health certificates and therefore pose a potential epidemiological threat.

    It is hard to tell yet how much the new situation will affect tourism, especially in countries where it is a core sector of the economy. But the cosmopolitan idea—a “citizen of the world” who stays where he wants or where he can earn his living—will no longer be relevant in the years to come. A whole social group and a way of life will disappear. For example, downshifting, when a person rents out his apartment in a big city of a developed country or receives a pension which is quite modest for a developed country, but lives somewhere under palm trees and settles for less, will become impossible.
    Ideology

    It will not be much of an exaggeration to say that liberalism, as an ideology of domestic and foreign policy, is based on the idea of specialization, and division of labor and trade. This idea was put forward and justified long ago by Adam Smith, David Ricardo, and John Mill. The same idea—the priority of international trade—underlies the neo-Marxist theories of dependency (Raul Prebisch, Hans Singer, Fernando Henrique Cardoso) and world-systems (Immanuel Wallerstein). As a matter of fact, the ideas of economic nationalism—mercantilism—(Alexander Hamilton, Friedrich List) are also based largely on the regulation of international trade by a nation-state. If the role of trade in the economy and world affairs is declining, any leading political philosophy (other than nationalism, perhaps) that exists today becomes flawed and loses appeal for society due to the inevitable negative economic effect and decline in consumption throughout the world. The end of history manifests itself not in the final victory of liberalism (Francis Fukuyama), but in the degradation of all ideologies.
    For example, the idea of unconditional personal freedoms and rights, freedom of movement and choice of residence, mobility within one’s country (U.S.) or the dream of moving to Europe (for people in North Africa) is in great doubt.
    Coming to the fore are not the political system or how much it is democratic, but cultural and civilizational factors (Huntington).
    Cultures of the World in the Current Situation

    In such a situation, judging by the effectiveness of the efforts to combat the pandemic, the cultures representing Greater Eurasia (China, Russia, South Korea, and Japan) have a higher sustainability potential.
    They happen to be stronger both in operational terms, that is, in how they respond to new challenges, and in moral and philosophical terms, because the weakening of liberal ideology and the democratic political system do not cut the ground from under their feet as much as it does in the Atlantic Community countries.
    Internal Integrity of Communities and Their Member States

    The pandemic and the unfolding economic crisis have significantly weakened international communities of various types, from civilizational and cultural ones like the Atlantic Community to integrational ones like the European Union. The pandemic has created an atmosphere of mutual mistrust, and the economic crisis, which has hit not so much the financial sphere as the real economy, will exacerbate this mistrust and trigger economic and political conflicts between countries. The situation will be similar to the Great Depression of the 1930s, when each nation-state tried to solve its economic problems at the expense of others through the beggar-thy-neighbor policy.
    At the same time, societies can be expected to become more united in the face of common troubles and problems, with more nationally oriented leaders who sincerely care for their countries coming to power rather than just right-wing populists. This does not bode well for the global world order, but the citizens of individual countries might feel more comfortable.
    Geopolitics

    Until today, the dominant and successful geopolitical strategy was not to control territory, but to control world trade through monetary and logistical systems, as well as through global military presence. This was the sole purpose why the Atlantic Community created international institutions and regimes, and built the global system of military bases and mobile naval task forces. The era of colonialism is long gone, but it has been replaced with the IMF, the WTO, and a global system of logistics and division of labor in which citizens of some countries perform white-collar and high-paying jobs while citizens of others have to do dirty and low-paid work. The system of intellectual property protection is also part of the world trading system built in recent decades.
    In the absence of (or amid a significant decline in) global trade, these institutions and strategies become irrelevant. If the economic motivation of such institutions and policies decreases or disappears, they become no longer necessary. In the new situation, land-locked states gain nothing and even lose a lot, but maritime states lose even more. Historically, maritime trade has not been a major economic factor in Eurasian countries and became prominent only in recent decades. But even then they tried to diversify their ways of delivery (China’s “Belt and Road” and Russia’s pipelines), partly in order to reduce their dependence on the maritime system of world trade which was controlled by the Atlantic Community. Now this system is set to weaken fundamentally, turning from a huge advantage and a source of influence and earnings into a serious burden for Atlanticists.
    * * *

    Some sense of foreboding has been in the air for a long time. No coherent international order and no single cultural and ideological space have emerged after the breakup of the Soviet Union. The world economy assumed increasingly artificial and ugly forms, relying on endless money printing, loans that no one was going to pay back, and growing economic inequality both among countries and within national societies. Social and ideological development also came to a halt. The stock of ideas pursued by mankind remains the same as 150 years ago, and the “conservative masses” have never accepted the concepts of a new ideal world, especially since there are none.
    The pandemic and the economic crisis served as a trigger for national elites—no one could or wanted to wait any longer. The processes that are currently underway may be described as a reaction of states and societies to rapid economic globalization at a time when the world still consists of nation-states, and no political integration is anywhere in sight, while societies, at least many of them, hold on to national identity. There can be other explanations as well.
    But one thing is clear—we are entering an era of greater disunity, while unifying bonds between nations remain quite weak.


    Last time the world had a similar situation was during the interwar period. Analogies in such matters are usually inappropriate, but similarities between “then” and “now” are apparent: separation, the absence of a global leader, and the weakening of global institutions amid a deep economic crisis. We will try to get out of this mess with minimal losses, but remember at the same time that not so long ago a similar situation ended in a world war.
    The article was written with the financial support of the Russian Science Foundation as part of academic project No. 19-014-00038 “Security Architecture in Greater Eurasia: State, Prospects and Opportunities for Russia.”

    International Life after the Pandemic — Russia in Global Affairs
    A tray full of GOLD is not worth a moment in time.

  2. #627
    Thailand Expat harrybarracuda's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Last Online
    @
    Posts
    67,311
    FFS that's a lot of Russkie bollocks to read just to say "The yankee dollar is doomed!".

  3. #628
    Thailand Expat
    OhOh's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Last Online
    Today @ 09:59 PM
    Location
    Where troubles melt like lemon drops
    Posts
    20,174
    Hezbollah between two fires: its own society and its domestic allies


    Posted on 05/07/2020 by Elijah J Magnier

    "Lebanese Hezbollah Secretary General Sayyed Hassan Nasrallah enjoys unparalleled support among Shia in Lebanon and more broadly among the “Axis of the Resistance” he is leading. He is the most famous leader in Lebanon and is highly respected and heeded by both followers and enemies, particularly Israel. However, since the financial situation in Lebanon has sharply deteriorated, he is no longer in an enviable position and will need exceptional skills to keep Lebanon united at a time when his supposed political allies are exhibiting unfriendly behaviour. Hezbollah’s followers and Hezbollah’s political allies are no longer in harmony. Tensions are now reaching unprecedented levels, not only in social media, but also with regard to political choices. The reasons are many.

    Sayyid Nasrallah has uncontested influence over his supporters to the extent that most of them echo the word of “Sayyid”- as he is called by his followers who also use the acronym “Samahto”, the Arabic terms meaning his eminence, a religious title. His speeches become a roadmap to followers, analysts, journalists and politicians, and details of his political views and ideas are repeated on most media platforms.

    But this does not prevent members of the society that bred Hezbollah – of which Hezbollah is an integral part – from disagreeing with the Sayyid’s statements with regard to his political bond to his allies, in particular the largest Christian party “Tayyar al Watani al-Hurr”, the Free Patriotic Movement (FPM). In fact, Hezbollah’s supporters have decided to bypass Sayyid’s recommendations and “ride the night as riding a camel” (an expression used by Imam Hussein Bin Ali to his followers the day before the last battle of Karbala, when he invited his followers to leave at nightfall to avoid been seen by the enemy and escape death the next day). On social media, another war is taking place where Hezbollah’s followers harshly vent their frustrations, impinging on Hezbollah’s comfort zone and challenging its political preferences.

    In one of his latest speeches, Sayyid emphasized the importance of moderating social media platform exchanges among allies on all sides, affirming that the bond with his allies is robust and in good condition. Sayyid Nasrallah wanted to deflate the current level of tensions resulting from a series of events that have taken place in Lebanon. No doubt, Hezbollah’s leader hoped to tackle the real problem between allies from a different angle, away from public platforms.

    As with similar demonstrations in Iraq, the US embassy attempted to subvert the popular wave of protest to divert protesters against Israel’s most feared enemy, Hezbollah.

    The “Future Movement” – founded by the late Prime Minister Rafiq Hariri and now led by his son Saad, both targets of the protestors – escalated the situation to the brink where its supporters closed the only road linking Beirut to the south of Lebanon. Hariri was upset that he had failed in this selection of a new government and was replaced by Hasan Diab. Hariri regretted having approved the selection of Diab and since then has sought to undermine any chances of success of the new cabinet.

    Closing the South Lebanon – Beirut road means blocking the movement of Hezbollah to the south, necessary to maintain military readiness in the case of any possible war with Israel. Following repeated blockage of this vital road, Hezbollah called on its reserves located along this road to be prepared to clear it by force. At this point the Lebanese army intervened to avoid confrontation, defusing tensions and winning a commitment to keep the road open at all times. The goal was to preserve the rights of peaceful demonstrators while preventing rioters with a political agenda from jeopardising Lebanese co-existence among different religions.

    Because the Americans are protecting him, Salameh is for Berri a bargaining chip to prove to Washington that he is also a protector of the US interests in Lebanon. Moreover, Berri doesn’t want to replace him because he, as Salameh’s protector, in effect controls the Christian Central Bank governor.

    This would not be the case if Salameh were replaced and a new governor appointed by the leader of the largest Christian parliamentary block, Tayyar al-Watani, the FPM led by Berri’s fiercest political enemy, the former minister Gebran Basil.


    In fact, for many decades, Berri and his closest (late) partner Prime Minister Rafiq Hariri divided amongst themselves the key positions that were, according to the domestic agreement, the share of the Christians. Because the Syrians were in command in Lebanon, the Christians were not allowed to choose their own representatives. However, this imbalance led the FPM to a fierce battle to regain all the lost positions, making its leader Basil the enemy of all parties, Christian, Druse, Sunni and Shia, with the exception of Hezbollah.


    There is another motive for Hezbollah to accommodate Speaker Berri at this time: why should Riyad Salameh be dismissed from his function when he is responsible for accomodating Presidents of the Republic to avoid sharing with the public the reality of Lebanon’s financial situation and for failing to warn depositors? Why did he agree to “buy time”, devise financial engineering and fabricate figures creating a time bomb that would explode without warning decades later, leaving more than 95% of the population without access to their savings? Let him stay and endure the consequences of his own policies since an immediate solution is not apparent.

    The dollar has already come halfway towards the ominous target predicted by the speaker in the case of Salameh having been removed. It is fluctuating between 7,500 and 10,000 L.L. to the dollar; it was 1,500 several months ago. Berri has become the focal point of the 14th of March political groups. He is their mediator and protector. The speaker, who has held his position for 28 years and is fully supported by all those accused of decades of corruption, is also a “good guy” in the eyes of the US embassy because he holds back his powerful ally, Hezbollah (as Berri offers himself) from taking over the country and thus protects the allies of the US, the 14th of March group.

    The Leader of the FPM is now left with only Hezbollah as an ally; unlike Geagea, he doesn’t enjoy US support. When the time comes for presidential elections, the Americans will not remember the apologies of all the FPM officials and ministers to ambassador Shea because the US quite simply has no allies but only interests. In any case, Washington is no longer in a position to decide who will be the next Lebanese president.

    The current Lebanese government of Hassan Diab has decided not to give up on the West but to diversify its choices and to fast track its industrial collaboration with China. It is also signing agreements with Iraq to import fuel and gasoline in exchange for Lebanese agriculture and local products with generous facilities for payment. Lebanese are already receiving medicine and food from Iran. Starvation is not imminent as Hezbollah is supporting the Shia population to cultivate the land, offering fertilisers and other agricultural needs.


    The possibility of civil war is remote. No one can stand against the Lebanese armed forces and Hezbollah. Both entities represent a wall against any possibility of a civil war whose existence is mainly limited to the social media.

    Hezbollah is showing high tolerance even towards those Lebanese who manifested in front of the US embassy in Beirut and offered their condolences to the US Marines killed in Beirut during the suicide bomb attack in 1983, triggered by the US bombing of several Lebanese locations and for taking part of the civil war. Although these protestors represent a show of folklore, their weight in Lebanese politics is insignificant. Hezbollah is not behaving like the ultimate dominant of the ground or the government even if it is the strongest military force in the country and is part of the largest political coalition.

    Hezbollah has always excelled in treading carefully the domestic and regional minefields and turning the tables on its enemies at the right time. Current alliances in Lebanon have been shaken by an economic crisis which is expected to last for a number of years. This crisis will certainly test Hezbollah’s diplomacy and the cohesion of its membership."


    Hezbollah between two fires: its own society and its domestic allies – Elijah J. Magnier

  4. #629
    Hansum Man! panama hat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Last Online
    Today @ 07:06 PM
    Location
    Way, Way South of the border now - thank God!
    Posts
    22,680
    Eurasia topic again?


    Okeeee

    The "Northern bald Ibis", "Hermit Ibis", or Waldrapp (Geronticus eremita) is the Official “National bird of Syria” respectively. is a migratory bird found in barren, semi-desert or rocky habitats, often close to running water.

    This 70–80 cm (28–31 in) glossy black ibis, which, unlike other members of the ibis family, is non-wading, has an un-feathered red face and head, and a long, curved red bill. It breeds co
    lonially on coastal or mountain cliff ledges, where it typically lays two to three eggs in a stick nest, and feeds on lizards, insects, and other small animals. The Northern bald Ibis

    was once widespread across the Middle East, northern Africa, southern and central Europe, with a fossil record dating back at least 1.8 million years. It disappeared from Europe over 300 years ago, and is now considered critically en
    dangered. There are believed to be about 500 wild birds remaining in southern Moro

    cco, and fewe
    r than 10 in Syria, where it was rediscovered in 2002. Islamic traditions helped this species to survive in one Turkish colony long after the species had disappeared from Europe, since it was believed that the ibis migrated each year to guide Hajj pilgrims to Mecca. The ibis was protected by its religious significance, and a festiva

    l was held annually to celebrate its return north. It is named as the "National bird of Syria" respectively. Conservation efforts for the Northern bald ibis in Syria began with the di
    scovery of an unreported relict colony of this species in early 2002 in the Palmyra desert for the preservation of Syrian Wildlife.

    There is no confirmed EVD case reported in Ghana to date.
    Ongoing surveillance for EVD as part of surveillance for viral hemorrhagic fevers (VHF)
    Highlights in neighbouring countries as of 31 May, 2014

    Sierra Leone: EVD outbreak declared 26th May in Kailahun District, 15 cases confirmed as at 30 May out 48 suspected cases from 7 districts. All confirmed cases are from Kailahun.
    Guinea: as at 28th Ma
    y, 291 cumulative cases of EVD reported including 172 confirmed and 193 deaths (case fatality rate of 66%) from 8 districts. The last confirmed case placed in isolation on 28/05/2014.
    Liberia: O
    ne new suspected case reported 29th May who died in Foya district is under investigation. Before this latest suspect, no new case had been reported since 9th April and the total cumulative cases were 12 including 6 confirmed and 9 deaths
    No travel restrictions to any part of West Africa or rest of the world
    1. Planning and Coordination

    Three meetings of National Technical Coordinating Committee held
    Initial GhC 800,000 a
    pproved by government to support the immediate needs of the Ebola Preparedness and Response Plan with GhC 50,000 released to the Ghana Health Service (GHS) so far.
    2. Surveillance and Laboratory

    Twelve samples of suspected VHF from Brong Ahafo Region, Ashanti Region, Eastern Region, Greater Accra Region and Upper East Region sent to Noguchi Memorial Institute for Medical Research (NMIMR) for testing have been declared negative for Ebola and other VHF
    Sixty regional surveillance and disease control officers an
    d 90 port health staff trained on Ebola surveillance with training being cascaded to lower level
    Orientation on EVD held for all Regional Health Administrations
    GhC15,000 released to NMIMR by GHS to support laboratory activities
    Thirty PPE presented to NMIMR by WHO
    3. Case Management

    First batch of 470 PPE from WHO presented to MOH and Noguchi for prepositioning.
    Fifteen copies of Clinical Management of VHF Guide and 5 sets of 3 wall charts presented to MOH by WHO
    Second consignment of 210 heavy duty PPE kits including cadaver bags presented to MOH by WHO
    4. Social Mobilization

    Press briefing on EVD conducted by Minister of Health
    Advertiser’s’ announcement with
    information on EVD, mode of spread, signs and symptoms and prevention placed in leading newspapers
    Radio and TV discussions and announcements on
    EVD ongoing
    Two thousand posters and 2000 hand fliers on EVD presented to MOH by WHO
    5. Upcoming Activities

    Adaptation of VHF Clinical Management Guidelines
    6. Challenges

    No isolation unit designated yet to manage cases
    Inadequate information campaign to the community level

    Limited training of health workers on infection prevention and control measures
    WHO Ghana Ebola Viral Disease (EVD) Preparedness and Response Activities | WHO | Regional Office for Africa

  5. #630
    Thailand Expat harrybarracuda's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Last Online
    @
    Posts
    67,311
    Bit of a silly thread really, but it keeps all of HooHoo's bollocks in one place.


  6. #631
    Thailand Expat
    OhOh's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Last Online
    Today @ 09:59 PM
    Location
    Where troubles melt like lemon drops
    Posts
    20,174
    I'm glad that you're entertained.

  7. #632
    Thailand Expat
    OhOh's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Last Online
    Today @ 09:59 PM
    Location
    Where troubles melt like lemon drops
    Posts
    20,174
    Quote Originally Posted by panama hat View Post
    Eurasia topic again?
    Quote Originally Posted by OhOh View Post
    Lebanon
    Two countries in Asia starting with "L". Laos and Lebanon.

    List of countries in Asia in alphabetical order

  8. #633
    Hansum Man! panama hat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Last Online
    Today @ 07:06 PM
    Location
    Way, Way South of the border now - thank God!
    Posts
    22,680
    And Eurasia?

  9. #634
    Thailand Expat harrybarracuda's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Last Online
    @
    Posts
    67,311
    Quote Originally Posted by panama hat View Post
    And Eurasia?
    Catch all innit....

    Lands End * to Putin O'Groats.



    (* It's actually Cabo da Roca, but it doesn't sound as good).

  10. #635
    Thailand Expat
    OhOh's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Last Online
    Today @ 09:59 PM
    Location
    Where troubles melt like lemon drops
    Posts
    20,174
    UNSC Adopts Resolution to Continue Cross-Border Aid Deliveries to Syria Via 1 Crossing


    "The UN Security Council (UNSC) has adopted a resolution to extend the work of one Syria-Turkey cross-border point for one year in order to ensure humanitarian aid deliveries to Syria, German Ambassador to the United Nations Christoph Heusgen has announced.On Friday, the UN mandates for the Bab al-Hawa and Bab al-Salam crossings from Turkey expired. Belgium and Germany initially insisted that the mandates for both of the crossings be extended, but then agreed with Russia's position to continue the work of the Bab al-Hawa crossing alone (until 10 July 2021).

    "Twelve members of the Security Council voted for the resolution … the resolution submitted by Belgium and Germany has been adopted", Heusgen said on Saturday.

    On Tuesday, Russia and China vetoed a draft submitted by Belgium and Germany that would have extended humanitarian deliveries into Syria from Turkey for a year through both of the checkpoints. On Friday, the UNSC was unable to adopt a resolution drafted by Russia that would have extended cross-border humanitarian aid deliveries into northwest Syria for a year from only the Bab al-Hawa checkpoint in Turkey.

    Russia had been seeking to limit the number of cross-border aid deliveries into Syria to just one checkpoint, Bab al-Hawa, which is used for about 90 percent of UN deliveries to northwestern Syria. The Russian position is that the cross-border aid delivery mechanism was a temporary and urgent measure initiated in 2014 and that the current situation in Syria, where government forces have regained control over most of the territories, no longer requires the work of so many cross-border checkpoints, which threaten Syrian sovereignty.

    Syria and Russia have stated that humanitarian aid should now be managed via Damascus.
    German Foreign Minister Heiko Maas welcomed the adoption of the new UNSC resolution on Saturday, saying that Germany wanted to preserve a larger number of checkpoints but eventually agreed to a compromise in order to keep the current humanitarian aid mechanism alive. According to Maas, Germany plans to allocate 1.6 million euros ($1.8 million) in aid for Syria and neighbouring countries this year."

    UNSC Adopts Resolution to Continue Cross-Border Aid Deliveries to Syria Via 1 Crossing - Sputnik International

  11. #636
    Thailand Expat harrybarracuda's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Last Online
    @
    Posts
    67,311
    Thank fuck is isn't all just going to Damascus, otherwise that slimey fucker in charge would probably be looking at selling it.

  12. #637
    Thailand Expat
    Klondyke's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Last Online
    Today @ 08:23 PM
    Posts
    7,252
    ^
    'arry hasn't disappointed again...

  13. #638
    Thailand Expat
    OhOh's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Last Online
    Today @ 09:59 PM
    Location
    Where troubles melt like lemon drops
    Posts
    20,174
    Your post:

    Quote Originally Posted by panama hat View Post
    Okeeee
    WHO Ghana Ebola Viral Disease (EVD) Preparedness and Response Activities


    30 May 2014

    Desperate times eh?

    -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Quote Originally Posted by panama hat View Post
    And Eurasia?
    An answer:


    Eurasia Topics-eurasia_-orthographic_projection-jpg


    "Eurasia /jʊəˈreɪʒə/ is the largest continental area on Earth, comprising all of Europe and Asia."


    Eurasia - Wikipedia


    Last edited by OhOh; 13-07-2020 at 11:17 AM.

  14. #639
    Thailand Expat
    OhOh's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Last Online
    Today @ 09:59 PM
    Location
    Where troubles melt like lemon drops
    Posts
    20,174
    Quote Originally Posted by harrybarracuda View Post
    would probably be looking at selling it
    The Syrian government, democratically elected by Syrian citizens, who need many things, deciding which are the most needy.

    As opposed to unexceptional foreigners and their terrorist organisations, "deciding and profiting from" those who receives the aid. who receives a throat slitting, who receives a chemical attack, who receives a local hospital bombing ....
    Last edited by OhOh; 13-07-2020 at 11:18 AM.

  15. #640
    Thailand Expat harrybarracuda's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Last Online
    @
    Posts
    67,311
    Quote Originally Posted by OhOh View Post
    The Syrian government, democratically elected by Syrian citizens, who need many things, deciding which are the most needy.

    As opposed to unexceptional foreigners and their terrorist organisations, "deciding and profiting from" those who receives the aid. who receives a throat slitting, who receives a chemical attack, who receives a local hospital bombing ....


    HAHAHAHAHA Democratically elected HAHAHAHAHA

    You little joker you.

    What was his campaign slogan? "Vote for me and I will have my friend Vlad bomb the majority Sunni population to smithereens".

  16. #641
    Hansum Man! panama hat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Last Online
    Today @ 07:06 PM
    Location
    Way, Way South of the border now - thank God!
    Posts
    22,680
    Quote Originally Posted by Klondyke View Post
    'arry hasn't disappointed again...
    Whereas you always disappoint . . . consistency, well done

  17. #642
    Thailand Expat
    OhOh's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Last Online
    Today @ 09:59 PM
    Location
    Where troubles melt like lemon drops
    Posts
    20,174
    Beijing raises retirement pensions


    "Beijing released a scheme to adjust basic pension for retirees, increasing 50 yuan ($7.13) per month for each person, according to the Beijing Municipal Human Resources and Social Security Bureau on Tuesday.

    The new scheme, which starts on Wednesday is expected to benefit nearly 3.97 million Beijing residents, including retirees of Beijing enterprises, government bodies and institutions.

    Wu Xiaojun, deputy director of the Beijing Municipal Human Resources and Social Security Bureau, said the adjustment of the basic pension will help retired people secure a better life despite the pandemic.

    It is the 28th time that the capital city has increased the pension for retired employees of enterprises and the fifth time since 2016 that it has adjusted the pension for retirees of both enterprises and government bodies simultaneously, Wu said at a news conference."


    Beijing raises retirement pensions - Chinadaily.com.cn


    Some perspective:

    The lowest pension in the developed world


    "At the other end of the scale, pensioners in the United Kingdom suffer from the worst deal of any OECD country, receiving just 29% of a working wage when they retire. To put this into perspective, the OECD average is 63% and the average for EU member states is 71%.

    Elsewhere, the pension rate in the United States is 49%, while in China, which is home to more than 1.4 billion people, the rate is 83%, OECD data shows. "

    Eurasia Topics-pensions-png


    These countries have the most generous pensions | World Economic Forum
    Last edited by OhOh; 15-07-2020 at 06:52 AM.

  18. #643
    Hansum Man! panama hat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Last Online
    Today @ 07:06 PM
    Location
    Way, Way South of the border now - thank God!
    Posts
    22,680
    Seriously, OhOh . . . what is it about Eurasia that you don't understand?


    Why not start a WORLD AND SPACE thread, you can safely deposit your wealth of knowledge there on any topic

  19. #644
    Thailand Expat harrybarracuda's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Last Online
    @
    Posts
    67,311
    Quote Originally Posted by OhOh View Post
    "At the other end of the scale, pensioners in the United Kingdom suffer from the worst deal of any OECD country, receiving just 29% of a working wage when they retire. To put this into perspective, the OECD average is 63% and the average for EU member states is 71%.
    Probably not a meaningful measure in isolation, given all the other benefits, free travel, heating allowances, free healthcare, etc.

    Not to mention that even 90% of a wage that was shit to start with is still shit.

  20. #645
    Thailand Expat
    OhOh's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Last Online
    Today @ 09:59 PM
    Location
    Where troubles melt like lemon drops
    Posts
    20,174
    I would take a UK Government pension of 90% of my last UK working wage. I suspect most around the world would as well.

    Quote Originally Posted by harrybarracuda View Post
    Not to mention that even 90% of a wage that was shit
    All relative.

  21. #646
    Thailand Expat
    OhOh's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Last Online
    Today @ 09:59 PM
    Location
    Where troubles melt like lemon drops
    Posts
    20,174
    Quote Originally Posted by panama hat View Post
    what is it about Eurasia
    Is China not part of Eurasia, news to me. When did the country move continents?

    The graph appears to include government pensions from many Eurasian countries, does it not?

  22. #647
    Thailand Expat
    Klondyke's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Last Online
    Today @ 08:23 PM
    Posts
    7,252
    Quote Originally Posted by OhOh View Post
    These countries have the most generous pensions | World Economic Forum
    Are all people from all walks of life included in the averages, also the hard-working ones like Bezos, Musk, etc? It should surely help a bit with the calculation...

  23. #648
    Hansum Man! panama hat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Last Online
    Today @ 07:06 PM
    Location
    Way, Way South of the border now - thank God!
    Posts
    22,680
    Quote Originally Posted by OhOh View Post
    Is China not part of Eurasia
    Nope. How dense are you . . .

    Quote Originally Posted by OhOh View Post
    When did the country move continents?
    It didn't, exactly. Well done. It still sits firmly in Asia

    Quote Originally Posted by OhOh View Post
    The graph appears to include government pensions from many Eurasian countries, does it not?
    I can't see Russia . . . is Turkey there? No? Then there are none. There are countries from Asia, Africa, South America, Europe etc...

  24. #649
    I am no longer a Hostage
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Last Online
    @
    Posts
    4,834
    Quote Originally Posted by panama hat View Post
    is Turkey there?
    Yes they are in second place

    The numbers for Denmark seems wrong. Way too high pension

    So.....

  25. #650
    Hansum Man! panama hat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Last Online
    Today @ 07:06 PM
    Location
    Way, Way South of the border now - thank God!
    Posts
    22,680
    Quote Originally Posted by helge View Post
    Yes they are in second place
    Then there is one Eurasian country.

Page 26 of 29 FirstFirst ... 16181920212223242526272829 LastLast

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 2 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 2 guests)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •