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  1. #21676
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    Quote Originally Posted by Backspin View Post
    You are aware
    No, he really isn't
    Quote Originally Posted by Backspin View Post
    You are also aware
    Nah, as time passes the drunk is less and less aware
    Quote Originally Posted by Backspin View Post
    Tell us again
    Please, not again - the soap-dodger will go on another 200-post bender . . . and what an embarrassment when someone like you makes more sense than he does





    Quote Originally Posted by Troy View Post
    The same route is still available, a route discussed at length in the Macmillan era that many seem to have forgotton.
    Correct

  2. #21677
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    Farage is back in the news again, this time trying to rip people off with a British gin at £40 a bottle...only it is quintessentially European...

    Brexit - It's Still On!-sei123256793-jpg

    Brexiteer and GB News presenter Nigel Farage has launched his own brand of gin, produced by a distillery in Cornwall, and it’s a range of three bottles, offered in red, white, and blue.

    The bottles have been made with “patriotic flavours”, and Farage boasts they offer a “taste of Brexit”, and were launched yesterday.

    With the help of Cornish artisans, who have not been named, the former UKIP leader came up with the three gins, with each bottle costing £40, and featuring a label with the Union Jack, alongside Mr Farage and his black Labrador walking on a Cornish beach.



    Writing on his website, Farage said: “I visited Cornwall for the first time in 1983, it was a fishing trip and I was 19. It seems a long time ago now, but my love for what I consider England’s most beautiful county has not changed. Amazing coastal walks, a rich and mysterious history, and the surfing, of course, there is no better way to end a fully packed Cornish day than with a glass of gin and tonic as the sun goes down over the western horizon.”


    In a promotional video, Mr Farage said: “This gin is genuine artisan gin designed by a couple, developed, literally, in their garden shed in Cornwall, using Cornish spring water. No added sugar.”


    The announcement of the new product received mixed reviews on social media, with one user saying: “Great to see you supporting British business goodness knows they need all the support they can get at the moment.”


    Another added:
    “Imagine walking into someone’s house after a date and seeing all three bottles lined up, proudly displayed on the countertop. It’d make you run an absolute mile!”
    Others pointed out to Farage that the gin is a “European migrant”. Historian Professor Tanja Bueltmann said: “I am so sorry to have to break it to Mr Farage, but gin is a European migrant.


    “English distillers began making gin after ‘genever’, a Dutch juniper-flavoured liquor, came to England in the 17th century and became popular. The drink is quintessentially European.”
    https://www.standard.co.uk/news/uk/n...-b1023237.html

    Which one of you Brexit loving losers is going to try it?


    * Mind you, I do like a good piece of Cornish brie...

  3. #21678
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    Quote Originally Posted by Troy View Post
    only it is quintessentially European...
    good Lord Troy, the hurt is strong in you, careful you don't overbalance when you are reaching that far.

  4. #21679
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    Surely this is a storyline from a forthcoming 'Spitting Image' show?

  5. #21680
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    Britain now in recession, the much vaunted panacea of a US trade deal is as illusionary as those prancing unicorns on BoJo’s sunny uplands, GDP growth lowest in the western world, and my long observed possibility of Sterling’s parity with the US$, as a consequence of Brexit influenced economic suicide, is fast becoming a reality.

    Brexiteers are truly quite the dumbest folk, probably outdoing Somchai in their idiocy.

  6. #21681
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    Some interesting comments reported in the BBC today...

    Doing it the "Truss way"...

    Former US Treasury secretary Larry Summers warned the pound could fall below the dollar due to the huge spending commitments outlined by Mr Kwarteng.

    "It makes me very sorry to say, but I think the UK is behaving a bit like an emerging market turning itself into a submerging market," Mr Summers told Bloomberg.



    "Between Brexit, how far the Bank of England got behind the curve and now these fiscal policies, I think Britain will be remembered for having pursuing the worst macroeconomic policies of any major country in a long time."


    This was a little more diplomatic...
    Jane Foley, a currency strategist at Rabobank, said the sell-off of sterling showed investors have doubts about the government's plans.




    "They're worried that some of these tax cuts that have been announced aren't going to be fully funded. That will result in a large amount of debt at a time when the Bank of England is going to be selling some of its holdings of UK government debt," she said.


    "I think this government does need to provide a lot more reassurance that it does have fiscal sensibility in order. This is not the message that's come across this morning."

    Pound sinks as investors question huge tax cuts - BBC News

    Didn't take long for Truss to show just how fooking useless she is...

  7. #21682
    Hangin' Around cyrille's Avatar
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    What an absolute mess.

  8. #21683
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    And all of it was as predictable as night following day.

  9. #21684
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    This is all covid and Russia related, nothing to do with Brexit!

    Brexit without 2 years of Covid and the Putin war would have been a resounding success.

    Still any stick to beat the the Brexit, carry on.

  10. #21685
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    Quote Originally Posted by Seekingasylum View Post
    Britain now in recession, the much vaunted panacea of a US trade deal is as illusionary as those prancing unicorns on BoJo’s sunny uplands, GDP growth lowest in the western world, and my long observed possibility of Sterling’s parity with the US$, as a consequence of Brexit influenced economic suicide, is fast becoming a reality.

    Brexiteers are truly quite the dumbest folk, probably outdoing Somchai in their idiocy.
    All blamed on Brexit as usual. Nothing to do with Covid and energy inflation caused by an illegal war!

    The new leadership of the governing party will answer to the electorate at the next GE. You will personally have zero impact on any of it, you spiteful, racist, slug.

  11. #21686
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    Quote Originally Posted by Joe 90 View Post
    This is all covid and Russia related, nothing to do with Brexit!

    Brexit without 2 years of Covid and the Putin war would have been a resounding success.

    Still any stick to beat the the Brexit, carry on.
    You’re trolling on a topic way beyond your comprehension.

    The union jack smiley is always a giveaway.

  12. #21687
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    Quote Originally Posted by Seekingasylum View Post
    my long observed possibility of Sterling’s parity with the US$, as a consequence of Brexit influenced economic suicide, is fast becoming a reality.
    The reality ...

    Euro parity with the $US






  13. #21688
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    Which bit of the £ has not been this low against the $ since 1985 did you not understand, you fucking idiots.

    Which bit of the UK has now the lowest GDP growth in the EU but highest inflation rate in the EU despite being one of the least reliant on Russian gas did you fucking idiots not understand.

    BrokendownbrexitedBritain is fucked.

  14. #21689
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    Quote Originally Posted by Switch View Post
    All blamed on Brexit as usual. Nothing to do with Covid and energy inflation caused by an illegal war!
    its mainly because the fed have raised rates far beyond the increases by the BofE, but the retired desk jockey as usual conveniently ignores this fact.

  15. #21690
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    Ah yes, it's mainly because of the Fed.

    Not a crushing vote of no confidence in Truss and her clueless cowboys at all.


  16. #21691
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    the latest move was in reaction to he budget

  17. #21692
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    Well, unlike Michael Gove, I prefer to listen to experts rather than our Mike, Switch et al...

    Martin Weale, who served at the BOE from 2010, said the government plans will “end in tears” and a run on the pound.
    Paul Johnson, director of the Institute of Fiscal Studies, said the plan amounts to the biggest single giveaway by the Treasury since 1972, when Ted Heath was prime minister and Anthony Barber chancellor. Barber’s budget resulted in spiraling inflation and a recession.


    “That budget is now known as the worst of modern times,” Johnson said on Twitter. “Genuinely, I hope this one works very much better.”

    The Institute for Public Policy Research (IPPR) said a “race to the bottom” on the headline tax rate on company profits had failed to boost investment and economic growth in Britain over the past 15 years.
    Deutsche Bank's analyst George Saravelos said: "We’ve been expressing our concerns about UK external sustainability for a while. The very large, unfunded tax cuts and other fiscal giveaways announced by the UK chancellor a few minutes ago only strengthen our worries.


    "From our perspective, the UK’s immediate challenge is not low growth. It is an extremely negative external balance picture reliant on foreign funding."
    Good kick in the teeth for the hoped increased investment...

    Borrowing costs on five-year government bonds jumped the most for a single day on record as traders dumped UK assets.

    It's not all blamed on Brexit, everyone knows that Covid and the Ukraine war have had a major impact on the economy. However, this is the Brexit government Mk3 (or it is Mk4? the PM turnover has been so high) and their attempts at a post Brexit recovery are "very brave"...

    For those who need an English => EU translation guide...

    Brexit - It's Still On!-diapositiva11-jpg

  18. #21693
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    ^ the pain of separation is still strong in you remainers

  19. #21694
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    Quote Originally Posted by Joe 90 View Post
    Brexit without 2 years of Covid and the Putin war would have been a resounding success.
    If ifs and buts were candy and nuts, we’d all have a merry Christmas.

    I didn't have strong views on Brexit because it was and is an immensely complicated issue, rather like the Peace of God, it passeth all understanding. Also I didn't have a vote, so my opinion didn't matter. I thought I'd sit back with a neutral position and see what unfolded. According to the Brexiteers' promises the UK would have a five star National Health Service with gold-plated bedpans or something. That didn't happen.
    SA is only stating facts, at the moment UK has the highest inflation and lowest growth amongst its European neighbours, who were equally affected by Covid and rather more affected by energy prices.
    On the plus side - well I am still waiting.

  20. #21695
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shutree View Post
    On the plus side - well I am still waiting.
    Don't hold your breath....

    Let Liz Truss and the Brexit brigade hold their breath instead...

  21. #21696
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    Current inflation rate in the UK: 9.9% (August 2022 figure)

    European Union inflation rate 10.1% (August 2022).

    Last edited by Neverna; 24-09-2022 at 02:08 PM.

  22. #21697
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    ^ We can ignore the camparison between an average of multiple nations to suit. However, the figure of 9.9% is the benchmark for comparison in 6 months time. Inflation, sterling exchange rates and interest rates will be the markers to watch
    BOE is set to increase interest rate as early as next week to shore up the pound. That will increase the amount of debt and lead to higher inflation.
    As some experts have said, the UK government have gone all-in on a gamble with little more in their hand than a five high. Will anyone notice?

  23. #21698
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    The best advertisement for Brexit is the nightmarish city of Brussels itself.


    Despite its status as ground zero of the EU project, its rubbish-strewn streets and lack of racial integration aren't something to celebrate

    ZOE STRIMPEL
    24 September 2022 • 7:00pm
    Zoe Strimpel.

    Last week, as Putin once more threw around the prospect of nuclear war, Liz Truss stood before the UN in New York and said that the West would not be rattled by his thuggery, adding: “Unless democratic societies deliver on the economy and security our citizens expect, we will fall behind.” It was generous, but wishful, of Truss to include the whole West in this. Or rather, to include Europe, which has trumpeted its strength in unity but done painfully little to deliver on the promise of security. Russia feels emboldened because, thanks to Europe, it’s been allowed to.

    The EU – none of whose member states have matched Britain’s contribution in weaponry and support to Ukraine – is good at making declarations. I found myself unable to suppress a snort on reading Thursday’s statement, hot off the press following the UN meeting, from the Council of the European Union. “The European Union condemns in the strongest possible terms the latest escalation by Russia of its illegal, unprovoked and unjustified aggression against Ukraine.” Oh, I thought. Putin must really be quaking in his boots now.

    The EU and its die-hard fans in the UK love to claim that the bloc, in all its cooperative, stability-loving glory, has shown unrivalled unity in the face of aggression. But Europe’s response to the Russian threat has, in fact, been anything but coordinated, united and strong. Confused, out of sync and tardy is more like it. There’s the EU’s helpless dependence on Russian gas, which it doesn’t seem all that committed to or capable of changing. And then there’s its fundamentally pacifist, morally ambiguous postwar stance, with no country more cloyingly antiwar than Germany, which began its support for Ukraine with a shipment of helmets and has continued it with more bumbling, hedging, delays and under-delivery. At the start of Russian hostilities, Emmanuel Macron honestly seemed to think he could talk Putin out of invading Ukraine using “dialogue”.



    The heart of the EU is, of course Brussels, home of the European Parliament and Council. The city therefore should be the crowning glory of all that a united Europe represents, the epitome of unity, coordinated infrastructure, balanced costs of living, great social integration.

    But as I was reminded on a quick trip last week, it is the exact opposite. Brussels is a sobering symbol of European failure. The station and its surrounds are apocalyptic and threatening-feeling, which is odd for an international hub in this most international of cities. The station itself is dungeon-like, with confusing signage in French and Flemish, all but indecipherable to non-locals, filthy platforms and, in the Eurostar terminal, coffee only available from a tiny, usually broken machine behind a till for duty-free bits and bobs.

    If one is able to find one’s way out, one hardly feels that one is in the cradle of civilisation. The streets are rubbish-strewn and flyblown. Social services, including rubbish collection, are clearly ill-equipped to cope. The extended area around Gare du Midi/Bruxelles-Sud is a bit like how King’s Cross used to be, decades ago before it became the Eurostar hub and one of London’s most gleaming, commercially important quarters.

    Europeans may know how to live, but they also know how to strike, and there was no public transport to be seen on the day I was there, so I walked the 45 minutes to my accommodation, which allowed for a few more observations. Remainiacs and the Left more generally love to say Britain is a “systemically” or “structurally” racist place. But walk through London and you will see integration: people of all ethnicities, and, thanks to the zoning of social housing, social classes, living cheek by jowl and going about their business together, from Peckham to Leyton to Regent’s Park. Yet in the EU’s capital city, the state of ethnic integration is very sorry indeed, and all dreams of multiculturalism seem pitifully distant.

    From the moment you leave the station and head south, you are in a ghetto of poverty, an inner banlieue of sorts. In Saint-Gilles, I passed the Centre Islamique El Mouhsinin, a quiet focal point for an area entirely dominated by immigrants from the Middle East and North Africa. Women in veils pushing babies populated parks and play areas, the only people on the street were men speaking Arabic, teens chased a screaming police vehicle.

    Brussels is famous for racially segregated districts. In Sofie Peeters’ 2012 film Femme de la Rue, Peeters walks through the city centre followed by a hidden camera, wearing a modest dress and flat boots. She is leered at the whole way. Truth be told, I didn’t notice any leering last week – the streets felt rather empty – but I was troubled by the racial homogeneity and the poverty. Especially when 10 minutes up the road, bijoux restaurants charge €19 for a salad and tap water is “not possible”. Even coming from inflation-deranged Britain, Brussels prices made my eyes water.

    It’s true that Brussels has always been an odd city, an enclave split between French and Dutch, separate from Walloon and Flemish territory, once the princely capital of the Burgundian Netherlands. It was the centre of Belgium’s gruesome trade in the Congo, the eerie “sepulchral city” in which Joseph Conrad’s Heart of Darkness begins and ends.

    Brussels appalled Conrad’s narrator, Marlow, in the late 19th century, no more so than when he returned to its beery self-importance from the scene of Belgian atrocities in Africa. Of course there is no moral comparison to draw with that aspect of Belgian history today. But while the city offers some of Europe’s finest cultural gems, it remains, despite its high status as ground zero of the EU project, a city of befuddlement and decrepitude that, at least as an advert for a crumbling Europe, works quite well.


    the telegraph

  24. #21699
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    ^ I can hear the screeeech as the bottom of the barrel is being scraped...

    ...she certainly doesn't let facts get in the way of her opinions.

  25. #21700
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    ^ large parts of Brussels are a shithole tho, i have certainly always preferred leaving than arriving.

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