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  1. #20776
    Thailand Expat lom's Avatar
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    ^^ I seem to remember that this was Boris Johnson solution to the border problem between NI and EU, it was he who suggested that the border should be in the Irish Sea instead of the original Northern Ireland protocol which had the "backstop".
    Even you strigils should at that time been able to see what a shit solution it was and the problem it would bring in the future.
    The world needs more people who plant trees they know they will never sit in the shade of.

  2. #20777
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    There should have been no checks, that was a solution Lom but your senate of little Napoleons couldn't allow that

  3. #20778
    Thailand Expat lom's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by strigils View Post
    There should have been no checks, that was a solution Lom but your senate of little Napoleons couldn't allow that
    Simplistic solution, why did I expect anything else from you..
    It's like saying that Britain should have an open border without immigration checks after Brexit.

  4. #20779
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    Quote Originally Posted by lom View Post
    Simplistic solution, why did I expect anything else from you..
    Which often are the best....which is why you and your continentals like to complicate, obfuscate and generally dither to justify their own existence.

    Quote Originally Posted by lom View Post
    It's like saying that Britain should have an open border without immigration checks after Brexit.
    We tried playing by your rules before and most of your dregs ended up here peddling their filth and claiming tax payer money whilst doing it, we are still trying to get rid of them

  5. #20780
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    ONS figures since 2003 onwards consistently quantified EU migration providing a net annual contribution of 2 billion to UK's GDP.

    Everything Brexit fuckwits squeeze out of their arses is bilge, bile and racist balderdash and that's because the entire Brexit constituency are bigoted morons too stupid, or deluded or ignorant to recognise the truth from a freshly laid Farage turd.

    Which of course is why the UK has the worst government in living memory that is riven with incompetence, stupidity, corruption and cronyism, and killed over 150,000 citizens.

    So far Brexit has destroyed the UK's fishing industry, threatens its beef cow agriculture and has decimated British SME trade by 25%.

    It's a fuckup but yet again, tell us all what is it the UK is now going to sell to the world that it couldn't before Brexit?

  6. #20781
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    ^ you are so myopic, like your beloved EU. You both seek to maintain the here and now. Nature abhors something static, a vacuum like the EU, it actively fights to change it, your EU will go the same way as everything else that fights nature. It just won't adapt quickly enough and will perish but hold on until the bitter end and in so doing harm its members. It would be better off as a loose association but no, the little Hitlers want control.

    The Brexit change is a but a blink of an eye, nothing over the next 20-30 years will be remembered in 500 years, its piffle waffle in your favoured terminology. You'll not be around to see it so perhaps Mystic will carry her predictions to the grave....har har har

  7. #20782
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    ^ Hoping Brexit will be forgotten with time is hardly the way to celebrate its success...
    ...Shouldn't you be telling us that Brexit is so good for the UK that people will rejoice for the next couple of centuries?

    It was a stupid mistake and people are too proud to admit it.

  8. #20783
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    ^ Troy if you are myopic then you are forgiven too.

  9. #20784
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    CAP reform has failed yet again. After months of negotiations (behind closed doors) the agriculture ministers of member states have, once more failed to reach agreement on reform.

    EURACTIV Agrifood Brief: Chronicle of Death Foretold

    Even the EU blog briefing is disappointed with the outcome.

  10. #20785
    Im bored AF Backspin's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Seekingasylum View Post
    PH, the solution was of course COVID but instead of wiping out the commie swine they exported it while quarantining an entire city through their merciless, tyrannous behaviour treating their own species like a fucking petri dish experiment.

    The world is fuckd now and no going back. Stupidity reigns supreme in the West, tyranny in the East with the lumpen Russians clodhopping their way through what's left.

    And the stupid, vapid youth of today are concerned about the fucking weather??
    So you are a climate change skeptic ?

  11. #20786
    Isle of discombobulation Joe 90's Avatar
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    The UK still a rockin and a rollin..

    The broad terms of a trade deal between the UK and Australia have been agreed, the BBC understands, with a formal announcement expected on Tuesday.

    UK Prime Minister Boris Johnson and Australian PM Scott Morrison agreed the deal over dinner at Downing Street.

    This is the first trade deal to be negotiated from scratch since the UK left the EU.

    It is seen as an important step towards the UK joining a wider Asia Pacific free-trade agreement.

    The UK government has signed a long list of trade deals over the past year, but they have been rollovers of those the UK already had as part of the EU.

    St,Ives is a wonderful place at this time of the year
    Shalom

  12. #20787
    Hangin' Around cyrille's Avatar
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    What Impact Has Brexit Had On EU-UK Trade?

    Three months after Brexit began for real when the EU's rulebook stopped applying to the UK, many areas of life have noticed a difference.

    The impact has been felt by both people and businesses -- although it has sometimes been hard to distinguish from the overwhelming impact of the pandemic.

    British exports to the EU have been hardest hit by new border formalities, despite the last-minute deal struck in December ensuring tariff-free trade.

    Although some sectors report improvements since the early chaos in January, they also say the problems run deeper than the "teething troubles" the UK government highlighted at the time.

    Meanwhile, a further UK delay in imposing import checks on EU goods means European exporters have not been affected to the same extent.

    Official UK figures in March showed the UK recorded a record fall in trade with the EU in January.

    Goods exports plunged by 41% and imports by 29% as the UK's departure from the EU's single market had a major impact, as did additional bureaucracy and sometimes unexpected costs and taxes.

    Nearly a quarter of small UK firms surveyed said they had temporarily halted sales with the EU because of post-Brexit rules, according to a report by the Federation of Small Businesses in late March.

    UK - EU Trade Overall

    Figures released on March 18 by Ireland's Central Statistics Office said imports from Great Britain fell by 65% in January compared to a year earlier. Recent German figures showed imports from the UK dropped by 56%, while exports were down by nearly a third.

    Trade between Great Britain and Northern Ireland has also experienced new barriers under divorce deal arrangements designed to protect an open north-south border on the island of Ireland. The EU has begun legal action against the UK after the British government unilaterally extended a grace period on some food checks.

    Food And Agriculture

    Euronews listed several examples of early problems food producers and other traders reported. An avalanche of cases airing similar grievances has followed: the pork exporter forced to spend an extra €4,000 per load that still got held up by customs; the Belgian supermarket now looking to Ireland instead of Britain for supplies; the UK beekeeper who can no longer import bees from the EU.

    A UK parliamentary report on March 23 notes that UK food producers are facing new trade barriers with the EU in the form of health measures, extra paperwork, higher haulage costs and some "outright export bans".

    Exports of some products such as seed potatoes have come to a halt, says the House of Lords EU Environment Sub-Committee. Small businesses in particular are suffering from red tape and transport costs. The lack of equivalence agreements is adding to friction, it finds.

    An analysis published on March 23 by the UK Food and Drink Federation of a 75% fall in exports to the EU in January -- salmon collapsed by 98%, beef 91% -- cited COVID-19 and stockpiling. But it said much was "likely due to new non-tariff barriers". The FDF added that the "collapse in groupage movements" -- where different companies send goods in the same load -- had hit small and medium-sized firms in particular.

    "Dismissing trade disruption at the borders as simply short term ‘teething problems’ is no longer credible," says a Brexit Impact Report by the British Meat Processors Association. "British meat companies are painting a very different picture. They are reporting systemic weaknesses in the current export system, mountains of red tape and a potential permanent loss of trade of between 20 and 50 per cent."

    Some bureaucratic demands are due to increase: for example, more export health certificates will be needed after grace periods end. The House of Lords committee warns that barriers to trade could become permanent unless the UK government takes action.

    The UK wine trade has welcomed a second delay announced by the government on controversial import forms for EU wine from July until December 31, which the UK Wine and Spirit Association said would have brought "price hikes, permanently disrupted supply and drastically reduced consumer choice".

    Fishing

    Deadlock over fishing rights was one of the main obstacles in post-Brexit trade negotiations, with the EU pushing to retain access to UK waters while London insisted on "taking back control".

    But the deal brings many "long-term" barriers, the Lords report says, dismissing the government's description of early problems as temporary.

    The impact of new demands for customs declarations and other paperwork hit UK exports immediately. Delays saw catch values halve and often made fresh fish shipments unviable.

    UK environment minister George Eustice told a committee of MPs on March 25 that the EU's ongoing ban on the imports of live shellfish was unlikely to change. UK producers have been unable to sell mussels, oysters and scallops to the bloc -- and have been told to invest in purification material or seek new markets for frozen shellfish.

    Cornwall Council in England and France's Brittany region have reportedly agreed to work together to facilitate shipments of British fish and seafood by ferry.

    Industry

    There was huge relief in the car industry on both sides of the English Channel when the Brexit trade deal was sealed, keeping the EU-UK market free of tariffs and quotas. A grace period over rules of origin -- delaying a requirement to declare where parts come from -- has also been welcomed, although this is due to expire at the end of 2021.

    However, concern over the impact of non-tariff barriers on supply chains continued into the new year. "That does not mean zero cost," Mike Hawes, CEO of the Society of Motor Manufacturers and Traders (SMMT) told a House of Commons committee on February 23.

    "I would characterise all the industry as paddling furiously below the water to keep things going," he went on. "In terms of general day‑to‑day operations, moving parts in and out, it is difficult. The administration is significant... This is the new normal; we accept that. Ensuring the entire complexity of the supply chain can continue to operate is a major challenge."

    Paul Everitt, Chief Executive of the ADS Group, had a similar message concerning aerospace and defence. Companies were experiencing "a day‑to‑day battle to make the new arrangements work and to find their way through this," he told the committee, citing delays and extra transport costs.

    He added that key parts of the industry "are not able to do business, and some of them are actually losing business", because of uncertainty over the future EU-UK relationship on aviation safety and regulation.

    British manufacturers reported a near-record increase in supply chain disruption and rising costs, attributed to Brexit and the pandemic, in an IHS Markit/CIPS survey carried out in February.

    "This disorder was primarily created by shipping delays, transportation shortages and customs border commotion. Though it was difficult to see clearly where COVID disruption ended and the Brexit muddle began," said Duncan Brock, Group Director at the Chartered Institute of Procurement & Supply.

    Healthcare

    Brussels gave an initial green light in February for personal data to continue to flow between the UK and the EU in the post-Brexit era. The European Commission's draft decision concluded that the UK's data protection regime complies with the EU's own flagship law.

    Health organisations on both sides of the English Channel welcomed the move. EU recognition of the UK regime "is vital for the functioning of the European health sector," they said in a joint letter. "It determines everything from the delivery of cross border health and social care for thousands of European citizens to governing how health data is securely shared to advance research."

    The fact that the export of medicines and medical devices continues tariff-free under the Brexit trade deal has also been welcomed.

    However, last year the European pharmaceutical industry highlighted the importance of reaching a mutual recognition agreement (MRA) on inspections and batch testing as part of a trade deal. Agreement was struck on the former but not on the latter.

    The UK has unilaterally waived batch testing requirements for products coming from the EU for two years. But the EU is still imposing testing on medicines going the other way.

    The Association of the British Pharmaceutical Industry (ABPI) has warned that this results in repeated testing "that complicates the supply chain and can delay the batch of medicine reaching patients for an average of 6 weeks and costs 1,500 per batch".

    Financial Services

    The Brexit deal contained only vague commitments on services and left financial services to a separate process.

    The UK and the EU have reached a "memorandum of understanding" -- as had been expected by the end of March -- on future cooperation. It's thought it could help City of London firms regain some access to the EU lost when the UK left the EU's single market.

    However, this goes nowhere near returning the full "passporting rights" giving blanket access to EU markets. And a decision on the lesser form of access -- given when the EU accepts a third country's regulation to be "equivalent" to its own -- rests in the hands of Brussels.

    The immediate post-Brexit period in 2021 has seen a flight of share trading activity from the UK into the EU, while since the 2016 Brexit referendum hundreds of UK-based financial firms have moved at least some operations to the bloc.

    100 days on, what impact has Brexit had on UK-EU trade? | Euronews

    Critics of BREXIT have been quite thoughtful over recent months in not using the effects of COVID as a stick to beat BREXIT over the head. One has to wonder if the more rabid BREXITers on this forum would have been quite so generous. In fairness, several of them seem to have recently been rendered mute by alcohol-related issues. However it is clear that the effects of the whole decision on BREXIT, beginning on June 24 2016 remain highly negative for the UK.

  13. #20788
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    Shutree's Avatar
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    Sausages threatening the NI protocol

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/m000wsgr



  14. #20789
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    Quote Originally Posted by Joe 90 View Post
    The UK still a rockin and a rollin..

    The broad terms of a trade deal between the UK and Australia have been agreed, the BBC understands, with a formal announcement expected on Tuesday.

    UK Prime Minister Boris Johnson and Australian PM Scott Morrison agreed the deal over dinner at Downing Street.

    This is the first trade deal to be negotiated from scratch since the UK left the EU.

    It is seen as an important step towards the UK joining a wider Asia Pacific free-trade agreement.

    The UK government has signed a long list of trade deals over the past year, but they have been rollovers of those the UK already had as part of the EU.

    St,Ives is a wonderful place at this time of the year
    So, you witless gullible buffoon, what is it that the UK proposes to sell to the world that it couldn't before Brexit.

    So far, your so-called free trade deals boosting the Brexit propaganda has ensured that British domestic producers are now exposed to cheap imports of inferior goods rendering their businesses increasingly uneconomic.

    In the main, Australian beef is shit but dirt cheap because their ginormous herds roam farms as large as Somerset in order to find enough inferior grazing and consequently produce stringy, tough and tasteless beef. Australian beef was sold in the UK before our EU status excluded it, and it was cheap as chips but utter shite.

    But as ever this gormless Brexit government continues to ignore the reality that only 9% of GDP is derived from the manufactured goods sector and of that 49% was through trade with the EU.

    The UK is fucked and once this phoney post-covid spending boom fritters away disposable incomes and stagflation returns the blood will be splattered on the floor for all to see.

    Those who lapped up the 200-300k 95% mortgages will be dead in the water and negative equity is going to haunt the market for a decade to come.

  15. #20790
    Isle of discombobulation Joe 90's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Seekingasylum View Post
    Those who lapped up the 200-300k 95% mortgages will be dead in the water and negative equity is going to haunt the market for a decade to come.
    Negative equity is a condo in Pattaya.

    House prices have risen by 10% per year, with last year being the biggest on record.

    You clueless buffoon.

  16. #20791
    Hangin' Around cyrille's Avatar
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    He's talking about what will happen to those purchases, you semi-literate troglodyte.

  17. #20792
    Isle of discombobulation Joe 90's Avatar
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    So am I, you mong.

  18. #20793
    Your local I.Q. Monitor
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    Quote Originally Posted by Troy View Post
    ^ Hoping Brexit will be forgotten with time is hardly the way to celebrate its success...
    ...Shouldn't you be telling us that Brexit is so good for the UK that people will rejoice for the next couple of centuries?

    It was a stupid mistake and people are too proud to admit it.
    Or... You could accept reality and wait to see how things pan out in a few years time after every economy has got back to something like normal after the Covid pandemic, stop fantasizing about bedding Angela and work towards positive outcomes for the betterment of your former country, or you could carry on being an incessant Brexit winger, who people dismiss as... well... an incessant Brexit whinger.
    One can understand it coming from seeking arse, who is mentally challenged just working out which foot goes next when walking down the street, but as someone who is obviously more intelligent, you should be able to move on rather than nit pick any negative you perceive, or what anyone with a modicum of intelligence knows will take at least a few years before it is possible to make any kind of worthwhile analysis. If you cant, my apolgies for overestimating you.

  19. #20794
    Member havnfun's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hugh Cow View Post
    anyone with a modicum of intelligence knows will take at least a few years before it is possible to make any kind of worthwhile analysis.
    Well said.
    After all It was 5 years ago when the decision was made, The vote was cast June 2016 from memory. And then it took till 2021 to finalize.

  20. #20795
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    Indeed, Brexit morons, so ably represented by Huge Cow, are blind to the reality that in Brexiting they were doing no more than suckling on the teat of vacuous rightwing jingoism and not voting for an economic doctrine of any worth that will enable them to reap a dividend. There is no reward, there is no bonus, there is no benefit, Brexit is, was, and always shall be nothing more than a fantasy woven by charlatans pandering to the stupid, the ignorant, the deluded and the bigoted rooted in xenophobic parochialism.

    The lower end simply cannot see further than the myopia of their credulous stupidity and recognise that Brexit was a triumph for the hedge funding tax dodging classes looking to capitalise on exploiting emerging markets by maximising revenue through the dumping of foreign surpluses on the domestic British consumer without any economic benefit to the domestic manufacturing sector.

    It is highly significant that even after five long years we are still waiting to hear what it is the UK is going to sell to the world that it couldn't before Brexit.

    Brexiteers are stupid and there it is.

    Britain has turned the clock back and in one fell swoop has now managed to re-erect barriers to international trade with its largest trading partner in the manufacturing sector. That has been Brexit's sole achievement in economic terms but in a socio-political context there has only been strife, discord, disunity, fear and conflict.

    Brexit always was going to be an existential threat to the union not least because it is impossible to have two independent states separated by differing trade and customs regimes sharing a contiguous border without some form of enforcement control imposing restrictions on the movement of people and goods, a situation which clearly undermined the GFA protocols ensuring the end to civil war N. Ireland. Bozo agreed and signed up to a Withdrawal Agreement keeping NI in the same economic sphere with the rest of Ireland and not only publicised this widely but used it as a clarion call to support him in the following General Election. In doing so he stabbed 300,000 NI protestants in the back who are now rebelling forcing the fat clown to renege on the WA claiming somewhat feebly that he didn't understand the full ramifications of his Brexit deal.

    Brexit is a dog's dinner that has produced nothing but fuckups and loss but the worst concomitant to this socio-economic-political calamity has been the election of the worst government in British modern history whose incompetence and ineptitude has only been exceeded by its corruption and cronyism, a fact that is scarcely surprising given that all of the cabinet ministers were appointed, not on the basis of talent and ability, but on their devotion to the spurious cause of Brexit.

    Stupid is as stupid does and you don't get much stupider than a Brexit dickhead.

  21. #20796
    Member havnfun's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Seekingasylum View Post
    a fact that is scarcely surprising given that all of the cabinet ministers were appointed, not on the basis of talent and ability, but on their devotion to the spurious cause of Brexit.
    The vote was to leave? yes? then for 3 years they fucked about? trying to stop it. so see what you get, If they carried through with the vote and got the job done back then, none of this shit would have happened. Easy peesy.

  22. #20797
    Thailand Expat lom's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by havnfun View Post
    The vote was to leave? yes? then for 3 years they fucked about? trying to stop it. so see what you get, If they carried through with the vote and got the job done back then, none of this shit would have happened. Easy peesy.
    They only wanted to leave a little bit.
    Eat the cake and still having it, this complicated the separation quite a bit. Almost 4 years of complications..

  23. #20798
    Member havnfun's Avatar
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    I like cake, chocolate mudcake. mmmmm and you can cut it up into equal pieces very easily.

  24. #20799
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    Evidently you are a fucking idiot. Fuck off you moron.

  25. #20800
    Im bored AF Backspin's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Seekingasylum View Post
    ONS figures since 2003 onwards consistently quantified EU migration providing a net annual contribution of 2 billion to UK's GDP.

    Everything Brexit fuckwits squeeze out of their arses is bilge, bile and racist balderdash and that's because the entire Brexit constituency are bigoted morons too stupid, or deluded or ignorant to recognise the truth from a freshly laid Farage turd.

    Which of course is why the UK has the worst government in living memory that is riven with incompetence, stupidity, corruption and cronyism, and killed over 150,000 citizens.

    So far Brexit has destroyed the UK's fishing industry, threatens its beef cow agriculture and has decimated British SME trade by 25%.

    It's a fuckup but yet again, tell us all what is it the UK is now going to sell to the world that it couldn't before Brexit?
    That's the pseudo egalitarian Gramscian globalist take on immigration.

    I guess that's what SA is. A neo Gramscian. Some elements of Labor like Corbyn , don't support immigration like that.

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