1. #27026
    Pedantic bastard
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    Quote Originally Posted by misskit View Post
    reports emerged of unmarked federal agents detaining protesters and taking them to unmarked minivans.

    l
    An interesting article on these unmarked federal agents (published after the Washington problems):
    The Story Behind Bill Barr’s Unmarked Federal Agents - POLITICO

  2. #27027
    Thailand Expat harrybarracuda's Avatar
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    What a fucking twat.


  3. #27028
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    Another lincoln project ad.


  4. #27029
    disturbance in the Turnip baldrick's Avatar
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    will the lincoln project make an ad to encourage people to register and vote ?

    Quote Originally Posted by misskit View Post
    unmarked federal agents detaining protesters and taking them to unmarked minivans.
    the stories online are a bit disturbing if true - it is also true that the 100 mile border security limit is also around international airports ?

  5. #27030
    Thailand Expat harrybarracuda's Avatar
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    President Donald Trump-wpcbe200719-jpg

  6. #27031
    Thailand Expat David48atTD's Avatar
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    I was just going to watch the first couple of minutes of the but ...

    Trump just kept digging and digging ... lower and lower



    @ 24.50 min Trump goes on about taking an intelligence test .. hard not to smile

    When asked 'will you accept the Election?", Trump replies ... "I have to see" @ 38 Min mark
    Last edited by David48atTD; 20-07-2020 at 11:08 AM.
    “Someone is sitting in the shade today because someone planted a tree a long time ago”

  7. #27032
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    ^ here is the 4min highlight real according to the WP ...


  8. #27033
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    Quote Originally Posted by harrybarracuda View Post
    President Donald Trump-wpcbe200719-jpg
    Yup. Difficult test:

    What happens during a cognitive test?
    There are different types of cognitive tests. Each involves answering a series of questions and/or performing simple tasks. They are designed to help measure mental functions, such as memory, language, and the ability to recognize objects. The most common types of tests are:


    Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA) test. A 10-15 minute test that includes memorizing a short list of words, identifying a picture of an animal, and copying a drawing of a shape or object.

    555.

  9. #27034
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    Quote Originally Posted by David48atTD View Post
    @ 24.50 min Trump goes on about taking an intelligence test .. hard not to smile
    No way I could make it that far. Disgusting man to watch.

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    This must be somewhat concerning for Americans.
    Trump consults Bush torture lawyer on how to skirt law and rule by decreeJohn Yoo wrote memo used to justify waterboarding
    Trump keen to use executive orders and circumvent Congress
    Julian Borger in Washington


    The Trump administration has been consulting the former government lawyer who wrote the legal justification for waterboarding on how the president might try to rule by decree.

    John Yoo told the Guardian he has been talking to White House officials about his view that a recent supreme court ruling on immigration would allow Trump to issue executive orders on whether to apply existing federal laws.


    “If the court really believes what it just did, then it just handed President Trump a great deal of power, too,” Yoo, a professor at Berkeley Law, said.

    “The supreme court has said President Obama could [choose not to] enforce immigration laws for about 2 million cases. And why can’t the Trump administration do something similar with immigration – create its own … program, but it could do it in areas beyond that, like healthcare, tax policy, criminal justice, inner city policy. I talked to them a fair amount about cities, because of the disorder.”

    In a Fox News Sunday interview, Trump declared he would try to use that interpretation to try to force through decrees on healthcare, immigration and “various other plans” over the coming month. The White House consultations with Yoo were first reported by the Axios news website.


    Constitutional scholars and human rights activists have also pointed to the deployment of paramilitary federal forces against protesters in Portland as a sign that Trump is ready to use this broad interpretation of presidential powers as a means to suppress basic constitutional rights.


    “This is how it begins,” Laurence Tribe, a Harvard constitutional law professor, wrote on Twitter. “The dictatorial hunger for power is insatiable. If ever there was a time for peaceful civil disobedience, that time is upon us.”
    Yoo became notorious for a legal memo he drafted in August 2002, when he was deputy assistant attorney general in the justice department’s office of legal counsel.


    It stated: “Necessity or self-defense may justify interrogation methods that might violate” the criminal prohibition on torture.


    Memos drafted by Yoo were used for justifying waterboarding and other forms of torture on terrorism suspects at CIA “black sites” around the world.

    Asked if he now regretted his memos, Yoo replied: “I’m still not exactly sure about how far the CIA took its interrogation methods but I think if they stayed within the outlines of the legal memos, I think they weren’t violating American law.”

    In a book titled Defender in Chief, due to be published next week, Yoo argues that Trump was fighting to restore the powers of the presidency, in a way that would have been approved by the framers of the US constitution.

    “They wanted each branch to have certain constitutional weapons and then they wanted them to fight. And so they wanted the president to try to expand his powers but they expected also Congress to keep fighting with the President,” he said.


    In a June article in the National Review, he wrote that a supreme court decision that blocked Trump’s attempt to repeal Barack Obama’s Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals programme, known as Daca and established by executive order, meant Trump could do the same thing to achieve his policy goals.

    Daca suspended deportations of undocumented migrants who arrived in the US as children. As an example of what Trump might achieve in the same way, Yoo suggested the president could declare a national right to carry firearms openly, in conflict with many state laws.

    “He could declare that he would not enforce federal firearms laws,” Yoo wrote, “and that a new ‘Trump permit’ would free any holder of state and local gun-control restrictions.

    “Even if Trump knew that his scheme lacked legal authority, he could get away with it for the length of his presidency,” he said. In a telephone interview, he added: “According to the supreme court, the president can now choose to under-enforce the law in certain areas and it can’t be undone by his successor unless that successor goes through this onerous thing called the Administrative Procedure Act, which usually takes one to two years.”

    Constitutional scholars have rejected Yoo’s arguments as ignoring limits on the executive powers of the president imposed by the founders, who were determined to prevent the rise of a tyrant.

    Tribe called Yoo’s interpretation of the Daca ruling “indefensible”.

    He added: “I fear that this lawless administration will take full advantage of the fact that judicial wheels grind slowly and that it will be difficult to keep up with the many ways Trump, aided and abetted by Bill Barr as attorney general and Chad Wolf as acting head of homeland security, can usurp congressional powers and abridge fundamental rights in the immigration space in particular but also in matters of public health and safety.”

    On the deployment of federal paramilitary units against Portland, Yoo said he did not know enough of the facts to deem whether it was an abuse of executive power.


    “It has to be really reasonably related to protecting federal buildings,” he said. “If it’s just graffiti, that’s not enough. It really depends on what the facts are.”

    Alka Pradhan, a defence counsel in the 9/11 terrorism cases against inmates in the Guantánamo Bay prison camp, said: “John Yoo’s so-called reasoning has always been based on ‘What can the president get away with?’ rather than ‘What is the purpose and letter of the law?’

    “That is not legal reasoning, it’s inherently tyrannical and anti-democratic.”

    Pradhan and other defence lawyers in the pre-trial hearings at the Guantánamo Bay military tribunal have argued that the use of torture against their clients, made possible by Yoo’s 2002 memo, invalidated much of the case against them.

    “The fact that John Yoo is employed and free to opine on legal matters is an example of the culture of impunity in the United States,” she said.
    Trump consults Bush torture lawyer on how to skirt law and rule by decree | Trump administration | The Guardian

    Where are all those gun toting militia prepers concerned about the gubmint taking over? On their way to portland?
    I definitely smell the hand of Putin in this.
    “If we stop testing right now we’d have very few cases, if any.” Donald J Trump.

  11. #27036
    Thailand Expat raycarey's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cujo View Post
    I definitely smell the hand of Putin in this.
    john yoo was banned from entering russia 8 years ago.

    but sure, OK.

    keep following your nose.

  12. #27037
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  13. #27038
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    When such a sleazy, repugnant and vile creature can still garner 40% public support, I have no hope in the US.

  14. #27039
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    Quote Originally Posted by elche View Post
    still garner 40% public support
    He got 25% of the electorate in 2016

    One can hope he doesn't get more this time

  15. #27040
    Thailand Expat harrybarracuda's Avatar
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    The most revealing answer from Donald Trump’s interview with Fox News Channel’s Chris Wallace came in response not to the toughest question posed by Wallace, but to the easiest.

    At the conclusion of the interview, Wallace asked Trump how he will regard his years as president.

    “I think I was very unfairly treated,” Trump responded. “From before I even won, I was under investigation by a bunch of thieves, crooks. It was an illegal investigation.”

    When Wallace interrupted, trying to get Trump to focus on the positive achievements of his presidency—“What about the good parts, sir?”—Trump brushed the question aside, responding, “Russia, Russia, Russia.” The president then complained about the Flynn investigation, the “Russia hoax,” the “Mueller scam,” and the recusal by his then–attorney general, Jeff Sessions. (“Now I feel good because he lost overwhelmingly in the great state of Alabama,” Trump said about the first senator to endorse him in the 2016 Republican primary.)

    Donald Trump is a psychologically broken, embittered, and deeply unhappy man. He is so gripped by his grievances, such a prisoner of his resentments, that even the most benevolent question from an interviewer—what good parts of your presidency would you like to be remembered for?—triggered a gusher of discontent.

    But the president still wasn’t done. “Here’s the bottom line,” he said. “I’ve been very unfairly treated, and I don’t say that as paranoid. I’ve been very—everybody says it. It’s going to be interesting to see what happens. But there was tremendous evidence right now as to how unfairly treated I was. President Obama and Biden spied on my campaign. It’s never happened in history. If it were the other way around, the people would be in jail for 50 years right now.”

    Just in case his bitterness wasn’t coming through clearly enough, the president added this: “That would be Comey, that would be Brennan, that would be all of this—the two lovers, Strzok and Page, they would be in jail now for many, many years. They would be in jail; it would’ve started two years ago, and they’d be there for 50 years. The fact is, they illegally spied on my campaign. Let’s see what happens. Despite that, I did more than any president in history in the first three and a half years.”

    With that, the interview ended.

    Such a disposition in almost anyone else—a teacher, a tax accountant, a CEO, a cab driver, a reality-television star—would be unfortunate enough. After all, people who obsess about being wronged are just plain unpleasant to be around: perpetually ungrateful, short-tempered, self-absorbed, never at peace, never at rest.

    But Donald Trump isn’t a teacher, a tax accountant, or (any longer) a reality-television star; he is, by virtue of the office he holds, in possession of unmatched power. The fact that he is devoid of any moral sensibilities or admirable human qualities—self-discipline, compassion, empathy, responsibility, courage, honesty, loyalty, prudence, temperance, a desire for justice—means he has no internal moral check; the question Is this the right thing to do? never enters his mind. As a result, he not only nurses his grievances; he acts on them. He lives to exact revenge, to watch his opponents suffer, to inflict pain on those who don’t bend before him. Even former war heroes who have died can’t escape his wrath.

    So Donald Trump is a vindictive man who also happens to be commander in chief and head of the executive branch, which includes the Justice Department, and there is no one around the president who will stand up to him. He has surrounded himself with lapdogs.

    But the problem doesn’t end there. In a single term, Trump has reshaped the Republican Party through and through, and his dispositional imprint on the GOP is as great as any in modern history, including Ronald Reagan’s.

    I say that as a person who was deeply shaped by Reagan and his presidency. My first job in government was working for the Reagan administration, when I was in my 20s. The conservative movement in the 1980s, although hardly flawless, was intellectually serious and politically optimistic. And Reagan himself was a man of personal decency, grace, and class. While often the target of nasty attacks, he maintained a remarkably charitable view of his political adversaries. “Remember, we have no enemies, only opponents,” the former Indiana governor Mitch Daniels, who worked for Reagan, quotes him as admonishing his staff.

    In his farewell address to the nation, Reagan offered an evocative description of America. “I’ve spoken of the shining city all my political life, but I don’t know if I ever quite communicated what I saw when I said it,” he said. “But in my mind it was a tall, proud city built on rocks stronger than oceans, wind-swept, God-blessed, and teeming with people of all kinds living in harmony and peace; a city with free ports that hummed with commerce and creativity. And if there had to be city walls, the walls had doors and the doors were open to anyone with the will and the heart to get here. That’s how I saw it, and see it still.”

    A city tall and proud, its people living in harmony and peace, surrounded by walls with open doors; that was Ronald Reagan’s image of America, and Ronald Reagan’s Republican Party.

    When Reagan died in 2004, the conservative columnist George Will wrote a moving tribute to his friend, saying of America’s 40th president, “He traveled far, had a grand time all the way, and his cheerfulness was contagious.” Reagan had a “talent for happiness,” according to Will. And he added this: “Reagan in his presidential role made vivid the values, particularly hopefulness and friendliness, that give cohesion and dynamism to this continental nation.”

    There were certainly ugly elements on the American right during the Reagan presidency, and Reagan himself was not without flaws. But as president, he set the tone, and the tone was optimism, courtliness and elegance, joie de vivre.

    He has since been replaced by the crudest and cruelest man ever to be president. But not just that. One senses in Donald Trump no joy, no delight, no laughter. All the emotions that drive him are negative. There is something repugnant about Trump, yes, but there is also something quite sad about the man. He is a damaged soul.

    In another time, in a different circumstance, there would perhaps be room to pity such a person. But for now, it is best for the pity to wait. There are other things to which to attend. The American public faces one great and morally urgent task above all others between now and November: to do everything in its power to remove from the presidency a self-pitying man who is shattering the nation and doesn’t even care.

    Trump Is Wallowing in Self-Pity - The Atlantic

  16. #27041
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    ^^^^ Chilling read.And to think there are still people who support this waste of skin.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Buckaroo Banzai View Post
    Chilling read.
    The Atlantic, my favorite site for opinion articles. Always interesting reading, no matter what the article is about.

  18. #27043
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    anyone else remember the time when obama sent out his best wishes to someone charged with sex trafficking?

    yeah, me either.

  19. #27044
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    Saw that.

    The question was framed about her turning in powerful men so you'd think the answer would be 'hopefully she cooperates so anyone who abuse children is brought to justice'.

    "I wish her well" is just odd to say the very least.

  20. #27045
    Thailand Expat raycarey's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AntRobertson View Post
    "I wish her well"

    he said it twice.

    it's completely fucked up.....but i suppose that's par for the course.

  21. #27046
    Thailand Expat harrybarracuda's Avatar
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    I wonder if he's sent a message that he'll give her a pardon if she doesn't snitch on him?

  22. #27047
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    They get better and better . . .


  23. #27048
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    Quote Originally Posted by Buckaroo Banzai View Post
    ^^^^ Chilling read.And to think there are still people who support this waste of skin.
    There are indeed tons of people that give Trump undying support here in the USA. It is unfathomable.

  24. #27049
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    Quote Originally Posted by AntRobertson View Post
    Saw that.

    The question was framed about her turning in powerful men so you'd think the answer would be 'hopefully she cooperates so anyone who abuse children is brought to justice'.

    "I wish her well" is just odd to say the very least.
    There is a serious disconnect between the man's mouth and brain.

  25. #27050
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    Quote Originally Posted by Buckaroo Banzai View Post
    There is a serious disconnect between the man's mouth and brain.
    Or not. Maybe he DOES wish her well. Maybe all the well connected connected have been in his ear.
    Will she get a pardon?

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