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  1. #6101
    Excommunicated baldrick's Avatar
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    There was a story about the 10 kids award about 2 years ago

    And pootin sacked his chief guided missile scientist last week which is probably a good indication that vladys fast missiles miss

  2. #6102
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    There has been a hold up in hypersonic missile production due to a chip shortage. They expect to restart production as soon as the next shipment of washing machines arrive from China.

  3. #6103
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hugh Cow View Post
    They expect to restart production as soon as the next shipment of washing machines arrive from China.

  4. #6104
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    Posted on August 23, 2022 by M. K. BHADRAKUMAR
    Erdogan repairs Syria ties with eye on Eurasianism


    "
    Yesterday, Russian President Vladimir Putin spoke with Uzbekistan President Shavkat Mirziyoyev regarding the forthcoming Shanghai Cooperation Organisation (SCO) summit in Samarkand on September 15-16. This must be the fourth or fifth time the two leaders confabulated over the upcoming event. One lost count!

    Putin and Mirziyoyev conceivably exchanged notes on a major event likely on the sidelines of the SCO summit — a meeting between Turkish President Recep Erdogan and his Syrian counterpart Bashar al-Assad signalling a breakthrough in the conflict in Syria.

    As I wrote recently — Russia-Turkey reset eases regional tensionsone major outcome of the meeting between Putin and Erdogan in Sochi on August 5 was that a reconciliation between Ankara and Damascus may be happening. On his return journey, Erdogan said he was going to contact Assad. Hardly anyone noticed, though, that Putin also invited Erdogan and Assad to participate in the upcoming SCO summit.
    Indeed, Mirziyoyev, who will be hosting the summit in Samarkand, has been in the know of it all through. Putin and Mirziyoyev have forged a close working relationship suffused with warmth and mutual respect that puts Tashkent back as the key capital in Russia’s Central Asian strategies, as has been the case historically dating back to the Tsarist era.

    Moscow has outclassed and outmanoeuvred the recent US attempts to stir up unrest in Central Asian region, whilst the Kremlin has one eye riveted on Ukraine. (The secretary of Russia’s Security Council Nikolai Patrushev, a longtime associate of Putin, lashed out last week at a meeting of SCO security tsars at US attempts to stage colour revolutions in Central Asia.)

    Coming back to Syria, western media missed the wood for the trees while assessing the Putin-Erdogan summit in Sochi. The leitmotif in Sochi was regional security in the Greater Middle East — the vast swathe stretching from Levant to the steppes of Central Asia and the Pamirs bordering Xinjiang.

    The Guardian came tantalisingly close to smelling the real story behind the 4-hour long “secretive meeting” at one-to-one level in Sochi, but lost the scent somehow after hearing that “Before the meeting began, Russian journalists noted that Ramzan Kadyrov, the Chechen leader who has sent forces under his command to both Syria and Ukraine, was in attendance.”

    The Putin-Erdogan axis is riveted on a balancing of interests to ensure differences (which are aplenty) do not turn into disputes. Thus, Putin is unfailingly attuned to Erdogan’s concerns today which devolve upon the state of the Turkish economy and the upcoming presidential and parliamentary polls (the two are inter-related.)

    Erdogan has his finger on many pies — from the Balkans to North Africa and Persian Gulf to the Caucasus — but what concerns him most is the situation in Syria, which has serious implications as he prepares to seek a renewed mandate. For Erdogan, Syria is like a Matryoshka doll — a set of problems of decreasing size placed one inside another. Who else but Putin could understand a Matryoshka doll better?

    For the Russian mind, the Matryoshka doll symbolises above all other values the search for truth and meaning. That is how Syria figures prominently in Putin’s cogitations with Erdogan. Packed inside the doll, one inside another, are: PKK and Kurdish separatism; US-Kurdish unholy alliance; Israeli footprints; Turkish-American discord (following the failed US-backed coup d’état in 2016) — all of which impact Turkey’s vital concerns.
    At Sochi, Putin could persuade Erdogan that the best way to address his concerns will be by engaging with Assad. Of course, Erdogan and Assad are no strangers to each other. The two families used to vacation together — until 2011 when Barack Obama and Joe Biden weaned Erdogan away.

    Fundamentally, there is a Turkish-Russian understanding that the strengthening of Syrian government’s sovereignty will strengthen regional security and that Ankara and Damascus have a common interest in fighting separatism and terrorism. Indeed, the natural corollary is that the longer the US occupation continues, the greater the danger of a “Kurdistan” consolidating in northern Syria.
    But the US is in no hurry to end its occupation, since the troops aren’t taking casualty; large scale smuggling of oil makes the occupation rather “self-financing” (like the ancient Roman legions); and the region also happens to be Syria’s most fertile river valleys.

    Erdogan’s security concerns in Syria are best addressed in cooperation with Damascus. As the first step in this direction, he publicly stated last week that destabilising the Assad government is not Turkish policy (anymore.)
    Meanwhile, reports have appeared that a Turkish delegation of former ministers and diplomats led by the leader of the Patriotic Party (Vatan Partisi) Dogu Perincek plans to visit Damascus to hold talks with Assad for the restoration of Turkish-Syrian relations. Interestingly, Tehran has since called for the rebuilding of relations between Turkey and Syria.

    Now, Perincek’s appearance makes this a demi-official Track 1.5 mission. Perincek is a seasoned politician with a Marxist pedigree, who was associated with both “Kemalists” and Kurdish PKK, had spent something like 15 years in jail during various periods until an intriguing prison release in 2014, and a makeover as fellow traveller of the Erdogan regime.

    However, one consistent trait in Perincek’s ideological make-up has been his advocacy of “Eurasianism”, namely, that Turkey should turn its back on the Atlantic system, pursue an independent foreign policy and head toward Eurasia to work with the Russia-China axis.

    Without doubt, Perincek worked on receptive minds, as a belief was gaining ground within the Erdogan government that Western powers — the US, in particular — are trying to weaken and divide Turkey through their support of Kurdish separatism, whereas Russia and China scrupulously refrain from interference in Turkey’s internal affairs.

    Curiously, Perincek and Russian philosopher and ideologue Aleksandr Dugin have enjoyed a warm personal friendship over many years, cemented by their conviction that Russian nationalism and Turkish nationalism have a meeting point in the ideology of “Eurasianism”. They have met more than once. And, like Dugin, Perincek is also credited today with influence among the power circles surrounding Erdogan.

    A presentation of the “Eurasianist” perspective on the Syrian question is available in a most recent interview by retired Lt. Gen. Ismail Hakki Pekin, former head of the Turkish Armed Forces’ Military Intelligence (2007-2011) who used to be the deputy chairman of Perincek’s party.

    It is possible to see Perincek’s influence in the Turkish foreign policy in the so-called Asia Anew initiative, which was unveiled at the annual Turkish Ambassadors’ Meeting in Ankara three years ago.

    https://www.indianpunchline.com/erdo...n-eurasianism/


    The bridge building LORD, one BRIC at a time.
    A tray full of GOLD is not worth a moment in time.

  5. #6105
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hugh Cow View Post
    There has been a hold up in hypersonic missile production due to a chip shortage. They expect to restart production as soon as the next shipment of washing machines arrive from China.
    Might be the case! I worked for a high-tech company decades ago and the leading edge processor at the time was the Fairchild F8 which was indeed designed for washing machines.

  6. #6106
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    Putin fairly deconstructed: a man, a myth, the state

    He’s all of these things in Philip Short’s 800-page biography, which credits the West in part for shaping the Vladimir we know today.

    AUGUST 24, 2022



    Philip Short has achieved something that in present circumstances might almost be called miraculous: a fair, balanced and insightful biography of Vladimir Putin. It should make very uncomfortable reading for Putin, in the unlikely event that he ever reads it; but it should be no less concerning for many of the Western commentators who have written about Putin and Russian policy over the past 30 years.

    That no doubt is why most of the reviews so far have concentrated very much on the portrayal of Putin, and much less on the Western actions that have helped to shape his policies. The British title is Putin: His Life and Times, and it is indeed one of the best books to have been written on the modern history of Russia and Russia’s relations with the West.

    Short is a former BBC journalist who reported from Russia and has published highly regarded biographies of Chairman Mao, Pol Pot and Francois Mitterand. His work on Putin’s biography took him eight years, and this is reflected in the depth and intense detail of its research. It is mercifully free of the wild speculation and the cod-psychology (“Is Putin insane?”) that has marred so much Western analysis.

    The character of the book changes considerably as it progresses. The first half, dealing with Putin’s early life, KGB service, ascent to power in the 1990s, and first years as president, contains many fascinating vignettes of Putin and events surrounding him by people who knew him well. These include an interesting portrait of Putin’s difficult marriage to Lyudmilla Shkrebneva, which ended in divorce in 2014. If Putin’s perennial lateness has been an affront to foreign leaders and Russian officials who have called on him, just imagine what it must have been like for his wife.

    The second half of Short’s biography is drawn more from public sources — though it is still full of acute analysis. Interestingly, while there are numerous references in the book to his wife, there are only two to Alina Kabayeva, the gymnast who is generally believed to have been his girlfriend for most of the last two decades.
    This shift from private to public sourcing obviously reflects the drastic reduction in the number of people around Putin still willing to talk about him; and this in turn reflects Putin’s growing autocracy and the progressive narrowing of the circle of people on whom he relies — a key contributory factor both in the launch of the Ukraine war and in the incompetence with which it has been conducted by the Kremlin.

    The portrait that Short draws is of a man with strong, even violent emotions, which are most of the time rigidly suppressed but occasionally break out with intense force. This extreme self-discipline, reflected in his early career as a sportsman, enabled his rise from the Leningrad slums and created his reciprocated attachment to the KGB. As Putin has himself acknowledged, it would have been very easy for him to have taken the path of so many of his adolescent friends and ended up as a criminal — a role in which he would have doubtlessly also excelled.

    One of Putin’s most attractive characteristics is loyalty to his friends and comrades. On occasions, this has led him to take considerable risks on their behalf. It has also, unfortunately, contributed to his willingness to turn a blind eye to their crimes and the immense fortunes that many have amassed at the expense of the state.

    Putin has changed greatly in the 23 years since he was chosen by President Yeltsin as a successor. As Short writes, and in Putin’s own self-image, he came to power as a conciliator of differences in the elite, and as a chairman rather than a dictatorial leader.

    He was also surprisingly willing in the early days to listen to unwelcome advice (far more so than Yeltsin) from a wide range of sources. His administration contained a considerable number of patriotic liberals as well as hard men from the security services. As I can testify myself from hearing him speak over the years, he was extremely well-informed with a quite remarkable memory and gift of detail.

    The transformation of Putin in recent years is partly the result of something that affects us all: advancing age, leading to ossification of thought, and a narrowing of one’s circle of acquaintance. He appears to have become bored with the details of government, and has tolerated clashes and overt criminality among top officials that he would formerly have suppressed.

    The grotesque leadership cult created around him by the state media must also have had a certain effect, even though, according to Short, Putin’s role as “Tsar” was initially something that was expected of him by his staff and society, and he himself was uncomfortable with it. With time though, to an almost cliched extent, Putin has come to display many of the stereotypical features of the aging dictator, and his planning of the war in Ukraine reflected this.

    Putin has always been loyal to the state and the idea of Russia as a great power. In later years he has come to identify the state more and more with himself personally. Then again, over the past two generations the question of state loyalty has been a very complex one in Russia, given the astonishing transformations that the state has undergone.

    One of the very few areas that Short does not adequately examine is the nature of Putin’s nationalism – an issue of crucial importance for Russia’s future. On the one hand, Putin has tracked much of Russian society in general in his rediscovery of pre-communist and anti-communist Russian thinkers. His hostility to Lenin and the Bolsheviks appears completely sincere, and as Short writes, his attachment to Russian Orthodoxy may no longer be entirely for show.

    On the other hand, Putin has inherited from the USSR (and elements of the old imperial tradition) a multi-ethnic concept of the state, albeit with Russian as the core culture. His regime has always contained non-Russians in leading positions, and he has never tried to exploit the anti-semitism lurking in the darker corners of Russian culture. If as a result of the war in Ukraine he is now turning to a more ethnic version of Russian nationalism, this would be a disaster for Russia.

    Putin (like most of the Russian establishment in general) has always been deeply committed either to keeping Ukraine within Russia’s sphere of interest or returning to Russia the areas which (in the view of many Russians) were unjustly transferred from Russia to Ukraine under communism. Short records episodes going back to 1993 in which Putin exploded over these issues.

    Short is however at pains to bring out the fact that the changes in Putin’s ideology did not take place in a vacuum, and reflected (as well as shaped) much wider changes in Russian attitudes. The repeated willful disregard for Russian views and Russian interests displayed by Western governments not only helped to produce a catastrophic backlash in Russian foreign policy but also contributed greatly to the growth of illiberalism at home. Short quotes Sir Francis Richards, former British diplomat and head of GCHQ (the British equivalent of the U.S. National Security Agency), on the West’s failure to reciprocate the gestures of support and goodwill made by Putin after 9/11:

    “We were quite grateful for Putin’s support after 9/11, but we didn’t show it very much. I used to spend a lot of time trying to persuade people that we needed to give as well as take…I think the Russians felt throughout that [on NATO issues] they were being fobbed off. And they were.”

    As Short indicates, Putin’s help to the Bush administration, and that administration’s subsequent abrogation of the ABM Treaty and advocacy of NATO membership for Georgia and Ukraine led to “a growing feeling in the Russian elite that Putin was being played.” This domestic embarrassment most likely contributed to the ferocity of Putin’s approach to the Ukraine issue.

    Short’s ultimate conclusion is a profoundly pessimistic one: that largely irrespective of individual leadership on either side, American determination to pursue unilateral global leadership (and European acquiescence in this) was bound to bring America and Russia into confrontation, given Russia’s determination to remain one pole of a multipolar world. “America, the global power, believes that its role is to lead. Russia refuses to be led.”
    For this reason alone, Short should be read by U.S. policymakers — because if Washington repeats the same approach with regard to the vastly more powerful Chinese state, the result could be the end of civilization.

    Putin fairly deconstructed: a man, a myth, the state - Responsible Statecraft


  7. #6107
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    Basically he’s a bit of an arrogant, hostile twat, shaped by the environment he grew up in?

    Offers very little hope for the future of the country or its people!

  8. #6108
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    A Russian protester puts puffy's nose out of joint. Puffy does his usual and fabricates some charges to get the man extradited, and a spineless Bulgarian court agrees.

    Lots of people in Bulgaria, as in the rest of the world, are sick of puffy's bullshit and Bulgaria ends up telling puffy to fuck off.

    Result.

    Under pressure from public opinion and the media, a Bulgarian court of appeal surprisingly overturned an earlier ruling on Thursday (25 August) and refused the extradition to Moscow of a Russian national who had burned his passport in Bulgaria in protest against the war in Ukraine.
    Given Bulgaria’s previous record of easily extraditing critics to authoritarian regimes, this ruling is rather surprising.
    Russian national Alexey Alchin, who has been living in Varna for eight years and runs a stable business in Bulgaria, protested against Putin’s war in Ukraine by publicly burning his Russian passport on 24 February, two days after the beginning of the Russian invasion of Ukraine.
    Immediately afterwards, the authorities in Russia filed a case against him for large-scale tax evasion. Moscow requested the man’s extradition and the Bulgarian prosecutor’s office quickly moved the case to court.
    Alchin and his wife, Olga Gyurova, maintain that the Russian request is politically motivated.
    In early August, the Varna District Court ruled that Alchin should be handed over to Vladimir Putin’s regime. Alchin was kept in custody, and the final decision of the Appellate Court was widely expected to confirm the ruling of the first instance.
    However, on Thursday, the court overturned the ruling. The decision followed large-scale public protests against Alchin’s extradition in Sofia, Varna and other Bulgarian cities, as well as publicity in the Western press. The Court of Appeal’s motives are yet to be announced.

    Bulgaria refuses extradition of Russian anti-war protester to Putin’s regime – EURACTIV.com
    Warning: Be cautious if you are a fragile pink

  9. #6109
    Thailand Expat panama hat's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by harrybarracuda View Post
    Lots of people in Bulgaria, as in the rest of the world, are sick of puffy's bullshit and Bulgaria ends up telling puffy to fuck off.
    An odd thing to say, but: well done Bulgaria

  10. #6110
    Thailand Expat HermantheGerman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sabang View Post

    Putin has changed greatly in the 23 years since he was chosen by President Yeltsin as a successor. As Short writes, and in Putin’s own self-image, he came to power as a conciliator of differences in the elite, and as a chairman rather than a dictatorial leader.
    Your post is pure BS as always!

    >In hindsight, the transfer of power is a set game. For Yeltsin, there is a good reason to back the former secret service agent Putin and elevate him to the top of the state. Because he immediately put him under the special protection of the Russian state with a decree and thus guaranteed his predecessor freedom from criminal prosecution. This is important for Yeltsin, since there are massive allegations of corruption against him and his family.<

    Putler was corrupt and a dictator starting day one and even before.

    Try using your brain when posting your Putler propaganda. You look like a fool. Just because some idiot wrote a book doesn't mean...ahhh forget it.

  11. #6111
    Thailand Expat harrybarracuda's Avatar
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    Sabang is so fucking gormless. Puffy wheedled his way into power and has used the state security apparatus to cement power, taking over both political and judiciary bodies so that he can literally have political opponents murdered and get away with it.

  12. #6112
    Chinese spy sabang's Avatar
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    Go ahead and write your own Putin biography for boneheads then. But nobody would buy it.

  13. #6113
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    Quote Originally Posted by sabang View Post
    But nobody would buy it.
    Nobody buys your propaganda horseshit. Well, aside from the other two stooges.

  14. #6114
    Chinese spy sabang's Avatar
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    "Putin is having his ass handed to him on a plate". Now that is some horseshit propaganda. I wonder who bought it ��?

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    Quote Originally Posted by sabang View Post
    "Putin is having his ass handed to him on a plate". Now that is some horseshit propaganda. I wonder who bought it ��?
    Putin is getting older, and probably has some health issues.

    Win, lose or draw, he still holds power at home because his legal control over political and judiciary says so

    That only applies inside Russian borders. Now he enjoys pariah status to the outside world, his authority and control at home will be undermined. His personal tyranny and shattered reputation is spent now, whatever happens in Ukraine.
    Even minor incursions elsewhere cannot restore his reputation, what little is left of it. Again, the only people to suffer are the poor Russian people who have no other option.

  16. #6116
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    Quote Originally Posted by sabang View Post
    "Putin is having his ass handed to him on a plate".
    You love to take things out of context, effectively twisting people's words. It is what you propagandists do. Putin absolutely was having his ass handed to him on a plate when I made that comment. Did you conveniently forget about the massive series of defeats Russia took early in the war? You know, the ones that resulted in one of the largest retreats in modern history? That is absolutely having your ass handed to you on a plate.

    What happened to the lightening strike in Kyiv that was supposed to be over in three days? Better yet, what has happened to the current Russian offensive? The lines have not moved in weeks. Anyway I am sure you have no idea anyway since for months before this war you bleated on and on that it would never happen.



    Utterly clueless.

  17. #6117
    Chinese spy sabang's Avatar
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    ^ More propaganda. Which is exactly why intelligent folk benefit from more sources and opinions than flag waving monkeys like you think are the only ones that so called free citizens should be allowed to view. Epic Fail.

  18. #6118
    Thailand Expat harrybarracuda's Avatar
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    sabang is just a massive putin brown noser.

    He knows nothing except for the bot farm propaganda bullshit he guzzles like a $2 rent boy.

  19. #6119
    Chinese spy sabang's Avatar
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    It's a question of mind over matter 'arry. I don't mind disseminating those articles that I think are worth reading, for the intelligent readership at least- and you don't matter.

  20. #6120
    Thailand Expat harrybarracuda's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sabang View Post
    It's a question of mind over matter 'arry. I don't mind disseminating those articles that I think are worth reading, for the intelligent readership at least- and you don't matter.
    Now he thinks the wanketeers are "Intelligent readership"


  21. #6121
    Chinese spy sabang's Avatar
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    Epic Fail. Most TD readers are not boneheads at all. That's your little exclusive club.

  22. #6122
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    Quote Originally Posted by Switch View Post
    Now he enjoys pariah status to the outside world
    What is your definition of your "outside world"?

    One presumes you have facts to substantiate your opinion.

    The NaGastan vassals, NATO, 5 Eyes, Japan and South Korea, have 16% of the world's population.

    84% of the world's population do not agree with your statement.

    Here is a link to one man's opinion, you may wish to read:

    Aug 25

    Russia and China as the Great Countervail


    Our salvation is a balance of power among all nations

    Russia and China as the Great Countervail | by Robert Billyard | Aug, 2022 | Medium
    Last edited by OhOh; 27-08-2022 at 03:12 PM.

  23. #6123
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    Quote Originally Posted by OhOh View Post
    What is your definition of your "outside world"?
    At the very least all the former Soviet Republics who have suffered under the Russians. Estland, Lettland, Lithuania, Poland .....

    They are all supporting Ukraine in every way they can. Knowing the threat Russia is.

    There are a lot of countries uninvolved that do not care. But they are not relevant.
    "don't attribute to malice what can be adequately explained by incompetence"

  24. #6124
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    Quote Originally Posted by sabang View Post
    More propaganda.
    Oh, so you are denying that Russia was defeated in the north and forced to retreat. I am not surprised.


  25. #6125
    Thailand Expat harrybarracuda's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sabang View Post
    Most TD readers are not boneheads at all.
    I agree, they all laugh as much at your witless bullshit as I do.


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