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Thread: Anna the dog

  1. #101
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    PRECIOUS MEMOURIES that live with you FOREVER.heartbreaking memouries TOO that you also never forget.please let me know when she went missing,the wife feeds 2 white dogs but both are male.there is new ones I see almost every day at the rubbish bins about 200metre's from our boundry wall so unless I get a close up look I cant tell if they are male or female.but with so many homeless dogs around at the back of our property its impossible to keep track of them.some of them I have proberly seen for more than 6-8yrs,i always picked out the ones that were afraid to feed with the pack and wait for them to go,then I would shake a plastic bag to get them to come to me.over the years I grey fond of many,but not ONE wagged their tails and even before they ate the food I gave them,[chicken,liver,hearts and rice or biscuit I had to keep hidden.then use a pole to retrieve the empties.but as there are so many around the back with others feeding them I still look for the ones that I recognize but hope they don't look for me as it still leave's a BIG hole in my heart.
    HH.DOG LOVER.

  2. #102
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    It's been a mixed bag since getting home last week after nine weeks in Norway. To be honest the wife's food ain't any better, but on the dog front...

    I discovered that Suear (Tiger), who I built the extra shelter for a few months ago (post 64) was beaten to death with a stick by a complete wanker living a few streets away. It seems that Suear caught one of this c^nts chickens. An absolutely lovely natured dog whom I used to trust completely with my young daughter, and with whom she used to love playing. I had personally fed Seaur or at least 5 years, he had joined us on every single dog walk for several years, I had inoculated, etc etc... Unless you take them in and protect them, they will always be vulnerable.

    RIP Seaur.



    Now, every morning dog walk where Anna and Vigo join us, and every evening dinner time with Anna and Vigo, remind me that Seaur is no longer with us. Over maudlin maybe, but Dill's recent 'Tearjerkers' thread, and Seaur's brutal killing have woken some long suppressed feelings in me and had an affect. What can I say. But I'm no fool, this guy has a lot of workers around him. As they say, revenge is a dish best served cold.

    On another front, I was worried about a litter of puppies born in my patch just before I left for work in early September. I was told the litter disappeared - which when you're away and can't do anything about it, is in some way's a bit of a relief. It's when you can make a difference that things get demanding.

    Anyway, I've discovered the couple just opposite us are fellow dog lovers. They took the entire litter in, along with another litter I didn't know about! They now have a total of 15 dogs, including their original adult residents. While I applaud their intentions, 5 adults and 10 puppies is one thing, but 15 adult dogs in a normal house is out of the question. That will be the case in a few months time... so I am trying to get it sorted and find homes. Softly softly of course... God forbid there should be a meddling farang...

  3. #103
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    Mendip sorry to hear that, crime didn't fit the punishment. I wouldn't go the revenge route, much as you'd want to as the repercussions can be too severe. Just leave it to Karma and with any luck he'll get his nadds ripped apart my a pack of soi dogs.

  4. #104
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    Mendip
    Just remember most of the Thai people are nice and friendly, but there re c**ts wherever you go.

    As NPT says hopefully he gets what he deserves.

  5. #105
    Thailand Expat jabir's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by NamPikToot View Post
    Mendip sorry to hear that, crime didn't fit the punishment. I wouldn't go the revenge route, much as you'd want to as the repercussions can be too severe. Just leave it to Karma and with any luck he'll get his nadds ripped apart my a pack of soi dogs.
    One problem here is that Karma recipients have often been depositing over the long haul, and when payback arrives are either too thick or thick skinned to perceive fair justice for what it is.

    Instead, he'll do a quick replay of who owes him what, tie in dogs with dogs and 'deduce' that his lost nads is down to Mendip's revenge being served cool.

  6. #106
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    "As they say, revenge is a dish best served cold".
    Yep, concur.
    Never let it rest.
    Await the right opportune moment.
    No witnesses.
    Good health and best of luck.

  7. #107
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    Quote Originally Posted by ootai View Post
    Mendip
    Just remember most of the Thai people are nice and friendly, but there re c**ts wherever you go.

    As NPT says hopefully he gets what he deserves.
    Yes ootai, you're quite right and I do have a tendency to tar all Thais with the same brush when something like this happens - a bad habit. Just the fact that one of our neighbours is struggling with 15 dogs she's taken in off the streets shows that there are kind hearted people out there also.

    Where I do think some generalisation is fair is the Thai trait of turning the other cheek and not getting involved. That allows these tossers to carry on, unchecked. I will avenge Suear at some point in the future.

    This was the third dog we've lost to brutality. The first was poisoned by a neighbour because she ran into their open garden and stole some of their dog's food - yes, they had a dog which they adored, can you believe. The second was also poisoned for having the audacity to run across a newly planted, but completely unfenced tarrow field.

    I find Thailand a very depressing place to live at times.

  8. #108
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    A sorry welcome back mate. Thailand can be quite depressing sometimes. Hope things get better for you.

  9. #109
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    We keep our dogs securely on the property and only take Bruno the Pit-bull cross for a walk outside around 5.30 in the morning or 5.30 in the evening when the soi dogs seem not to be around.

    I see Pattaya council have told us we need to register our dogs and keep them within our property unless we have them under control on a leash.

    Failure to do so will see a fine.

    I can understand how a Thai can complain about having his live stock killed but to brutally murder the dog is totally unacceptable.

  10. #110
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    " Failure to do so will see a fine." ^ seriously, has anyone ever been fined? I hope so but really doubt it.


    Condolences Mendip, sure you and your daughter miss him.

  11. #111
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    Savage.. a friend's husky killed a prize cock here and was then shot with a catapult and then the guy came to get compensated by the dog owner. But as that brutal Thai would have saw your Tiger as a soi dog, he would i guess have thought that the only way its not gonna happen again is to get the dog out of the picture.
    That's not the Buddhist way though and is unlawful too to kill a dog here.
    Although once a dog does kill a chicken it will do it again. I see loads of free roaming chickens here living in harmony with dogs.

    I'm not justifying what that Thai did but can understand why he did it.

    Maybe if you put collars on these dogs it may help... could also lead to you getting extorted at will.
    Or go to the Police. But the offence which carries two years jail or a 40,000 baht fine here is killing a soi dog without reason...which he probably will justify he had

    Man Charged with Killing Dog Under Thailand?s Animal Abuse Law | Thailand Law Forum - Thailand Legal issues, Law News and Selected Laws

    Sorry about your loss

  12. #112
    Thailand Expat jabir's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mendip View Post
    Yes ootai, you're quite right and I do have a tendency to tar all Thais with the same brush when something like this happens - a bad habit. Just the fact that one of our neighbours is struggling with 15 dogs she's taken in off the streets shows that there are kind hearted people out there also.

    Where I do think some generalisation is fair is the Thai trait of turning the other cheek and not getting involved. That allows these tossers to carry on, unchecked. I will avenge Suear at some point in the future.

    This was the third dog we've lost to brutality. The first was poisoned by a neighbour because she ran into their open garden and stole some of their dog's food - yes, they had a dog which they adored, can you believe. The second was also poisoned for having the audacity to run across a newly planted, but completely unfenced tarrow field.

    I find Thailand a very depressing place to live at times.
    Sorry too, and as you say a broad brush can tarnish stuff you would want to leave as is; otherwise I have no objection to getting even and am grateful to karma for visiting the Staffs that mauled my young lady's miniature yorkies.

    But here in Thailand I tend to view that as a pointless exercise, like choosing one roach and focusing on it during an infestation.

  13. #113
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    Thanks for the thoughts guys.

    I'm old and ugly enough not to get badly affected by it - but it was so unnecessary, that what really gets me. They're not our dogs, but have taken to living out the back where we've been feeding them for years, and getting them vaccinated, etc. And this guy was well aware of the situation. One slip up and he beats a dog to death. If he had come and mentioned it, I could have made arrangements. Mind you, Thais aren't exactly known for controlling their temper.

    It's Thailand, I guess...

  14. #114
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mendip View Post
    Thanks for the thoughts guys.

    I'm old and ugly enough not to get badly affected by it - but it was so unnecessary, that what really gets me. They're not our dogs, but have taken to living out the back where we've been feeding them for years, and getting them vaccinated, etc. And this guy was well aware of the situation. One slip up and he beats a dog to death. If he had come and mentioned it, I could have made arrangements. Mind you, Thais aren't exactly known for controlling their temper.

    It's Thailand, I guess...
    Keep a weather eye on him. A saying here is "kicking dogs". Taking out your anger on something other than what you are really angry at. If he knew you were looking after the animals he may be sending a message.

  15. #115
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    Tonight was 'boules' night with the nipper. Gets her off the tablet and gets me away from the blaring tv.

    Anna was around to watch. It's not the same without Suear, but you can't let that spoil it for me daughter, or the other dogs. Unfinished business for later.

    Anna watches us set up...



    And stays to see me thrash the daughter!



    A good victory tonight! And losing is character building for kids, they say!

    I want to bring Anna in - you can just see how much she wants to be part of the family. Our 13 year old matriarch Dan will never allow that unfortunately - but I'm hoping Anna holds out. She is such a lovely dog. One day she will get her chance.

  16. #116
    Days Work Done! Norton's Avatar
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    Great thread this. Thanks very much for sharing. Brings to mind one of our finest members. November Rain and her dog adventures.

  17. #117
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    A bit of a recap... I'd been away for a long spell of work and things change quickly on the dog front. My gardener looks after the dogs when I'm away, but things always seem to go a bit awry...).

    As mentioned, Suear beaten to death with a stick.

    Yogi's dad's girlfriend died in child (puppy) birth, just before I left.

    Elsa has now disappeared.

    These dogs have it hard. Even when being looked after, many dogs disappear when we have gangs of Cambodian labourers around. FFS, these guys net the song birds, trap the mongooses and kill the bats - nothing is sacred. The dogs that don't get trapped for food have to survive the road. Most of the dogs that survive puppyhood have done so through some degree of road sense, but one arsehole undertaking along a pavement will take out several dogs at a time. Unfortunately the dogs learn normal traffic rules better then many humans.

    After school, my daughter and I have a routine of feeding several dogs on the way home. Occasionally we head down quiet tracks to see if we can find Elsa, but who am I kidding. My daughter knows she's gone, I know she's gone. But it's always nice to think she went on to pastures new and found a home.

    As for Yogi's dad, mentioned in posts above, he's doing very well. Despite being crippled, he sired another two litters while I was away. Our neighbours took in the puppies. Applaudable in my eyes, but maybe misguided. They now have 15 dogs, in a small house, rented. It will end badly I am sure. I wonder about the safety of having so many dogs in a confined space, once they mature and get territorial. At the moment most are still puppies. Anyway, what can ya do... I'll help them and they are doing what they think is right. Nice people.


  18. #118
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    What a genuinely good bloke you come across as. Good on yer.

  19. #119
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    Quote Originally Posted by hallelujah View Post
    What a genuinely good bloke you come across as. Good on yer.
    +1. Concur.
    Great thread, heartwarming story by a top bloke.
    Kudos!

  20. #120
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    Thanks man, that was beautiful. Only read the OP, will catch up with the rest later.

    Went to Battersea last week with a view to rehoming a rescue - their dwellings are comparitively palatial. Thai dogs have definitely got the shitty end of the stick. Doesn't help that the country is riddled with spineless kunts.

  21. #121
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    My involvement with street dogs started in 2006 when the wife and I moved up to Korat. Prior to that I'd lived in Malaysia and Singapore, and been a regular visitor to Thailand, but I think it's not until you actually live in a place like Korat that you appreciate what a shitty deal these dogs often get. It was my first experience of seeing so many dead dogs on the side of the road, and homeless dogs trotting along major highways looking for somewhere to go. I always find it particularly sad to see dead puppies of a few days old in the road - how does that happen?

    The complete disregard and ignorance to the dogs' welfare is one thing, but the cruelty and brutality I've seen dished out will always be upsetting and I'm often left wondering how 'Buddhists' can be that way. I have of course had to harden considerably, but you can't escape your upbringing. I'm sure many others who have lived in Thailand will feel the same way.

    Anyway, back in 2006 we were finding our feet in Korat, and after being away for so long the wife was enjoying being back in Isaan. We got in the habit of going to the Isaan outdoor shows a couple of times a week. To be honest, with not knowing the language, I found one show much the same as another - but it's always nice to see live theatre... within reason.





    And another... just because I've never seen a set of gnashers on someone like that before or since...



    Of course, as soon as I sit outside to eat, our table is soon surrounded by dogs. It drives the wife nuts, but I just can't help meself. I've often noticed the street dogs gravitate towards a farang... they can spot a softy!

    One such dog back then was 'Dam' (black). He was an absolutely lovely dog and used to sit by my side and take tidbits. After eating I used to roll him over on his back and pick off his ticks - that used to drive the wife mad as well. But once she got immersed in the Isaan comedy shows I needed to find something to keep meself occupied.



    And here is Dam looking up at me and waiting for his after-meal grooming!



    I noticed that a female dog Dam used to hang around with was running off with her morsels of food, and then returning for more. It was obvious she had a litter somewhere, so one night I followed her backstage and found the litter of pups. The actors at the show had been looking after them and the puppies lived behind the stage. There were five in all, but only three in this pic.



    The wife got friendly with the actors and actresses (can you still say that?) and we used to go backstage after the shows to feed the puppies. This had an added bonus in that I'd occasionally get a sneaky glimpse of the girls changing. There were a lot of the usual 'actor' types, but a few very pretty girls as well! So long as they're kind to the dogs, who am I to judge! Nice people!



    The litter had three girls and two boys (there is always more girls...). So, one thing led to another and we took one of the boys home. The show people had already named him 'Den'.

    At this point I'd been single, living like a gypsy and working offshore for years, so had been unable to keep pets since I 'd lived at home with the folks. I remember one year I was unexpectedly called away for a job at Christmas, and didn't return to my place in Somerset until June... to a pile of post and a bare Christmas tree surrounded by pine needles. I couldn't even keep a cactus alive back then.

    So getting my first dog in years was a big deal!

    Here is Den on his first night at his new home!



    And with his first toy!

    Last edited by Mendip; 07-12-2019 at 02:37 PM.

  22. #122
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    Well...

    I was sitting out the back today doing Science homework with me daughter, when the delivery guy set the dogs off. This forum is most surprising at times... it was a very generous delivery from Mr NPT!

    A very big thank you from all involved!



    The daughter seems to be under the mistaken impression the Terry's Chocolate Orange is for her!!?



    The strict pecking order had to be observed. We first woke our old gal Dan having a midday nap in her winter bed...



    Then number two, Max... Yogi looks on, waiting his turn.



    Number three, Tommy, straight down to business... the daughter better keep those toes out of the way!



    And last but not least, our newest arrival, Yogi!



    The resident dogs taken care of, we popped out the back...

    Vigo... not too sure how to tackle his bone.



    And of course, Anna! Waiting patiently to start her bone while the daughter tries to pose for the perfect photo!



    Many thanks, NamPikToot!!! A wonderful surprise!

  23. #123
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    God damit, me phone has packed up so have to borrow the Mrs one and now you've undermined my carefully nutured reputation with Reach by mixing his two favourite subject where i am concerned: dogs and money. Anyhow you and mini mendip are welcome.

  24. #124
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    ^ Much to my dismay the daughter discovered she like orange flavoured chocolate. You've started something here...

    Anyway, back to 2006 and we'd just taken Den in off the street, my first dog for many many years.

    He soon settled in and made friends with the neighbours' dogs.



    I was still working regularly away, so missed big steps in his development. One of these was house training... which of course didn't happen. I had never before had a dog that hadn't been house trained - it just doesn't seem to happen in Thailand. It would seem preferable to constantly chastise a dog and clean up after it, than to spend a few a few weeks of hard work to house train it, which then lasts for life. I guess the parallels with raising kids in this country are easy to make. Anyway, that ship has sailed and unless I can be home 100% of my time it will never happen and I've got used to un-house trained dogs. They live outside or in the workshop now, so no big deal I guess.

    A few weeks after we took in Den, one puppy died in the box they lived in, accidentally smothered by the mum. Soon after that, the mum was killed on the road. The 'show' people continued to look after the remaining three puppies... until one of them followed his mum and died on the same road. That left the father, Dam, and two girl puppies. Very unusually the father looked after the puppies and kept them safe - he was a very special dog. I once had a male ferret called Salt who shared looking after ferret pups with his 'wife', Pepper. That was also very unusual and just goes to show that every animal is different.

    Maybe two or three months later I had a call from the wife while I was working offshore. She was upset... had just found one of the remaining girl puppies half dead after being hit by a car. She was lying under a table in an outdoor restaurant (the puppy, not the wife) and wouldn't eat, just lay there shivering in the rain - this was at the end of the rainy season. The wife wanted to take in the puppy and try and save her... what can ya say... Welcome to Dan (also named by the show people - all the dogs names started with a 'D').

    I arrived home a few weeks later to find Den and Dan nicely settled in. Dan had made a good recovery - although to this day (13 years later) she still has a slightly withered rear left leg from where she was hit by the car, and she still shakes with fear whenever we get any thunder. I think the thunder must remind her of the bad times when when was nearly dead in her first rainy season. One evening we went down to the same restaurant where my wife had found Dan, and little Din (soil) was running around. The third and final puppy... the dad was still around but by this time was more interested in new conquests than looking after his remaining puppy.

    Din was skinny and in a sorry state, so what can ya do? I picked her up and took her home in the car. Den, Dan and Din (right to left) re-united!



    They were of course forced to wear those ridiculous dog clothes.



    And wrecked the mother-in-laws furniture. We were staying there while our house was being built... happy days ...



    But who cares about that! I had three dogs!



    Three very happy dogs and a happy owner!

    But if there's one thing I've learnt about Thailand, if things are going well, it's only because the bad thing hasn't happened yet. I've never known a place to kick you in the teeth like Thailand does, without fail.

  25. #125
    Thailand Expat AntRobertson's Avatar
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    Haha, that's a great pic that last one.

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