Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 26
  1. #1
    Member

    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Last Online
    24-11-2013 @ 12:17 PM
    Posts
    155

    Cool Lorry and Bus safety in Thailand

    Following the terrible tragedy in Saraburi where 19 bus passengers were killed following a collision with a lorry (who's driver apparently fell asleep at the wheel) it is time the transport authorities and police in Thailand seriously tackle this situation. A statement in the Bangkok Post is quoted as saying the ministry is looking into the safety of double decker buses I would point out that these types of vehicles,as used in Europe,are perfectly safe if driven in a sensible proffessional manner and that the wieght distribution when loading is taken into account. What would help in creating a safer situation is the introduction of the following:-
    1) The introduction of professional compulsory training of all HGV and bus
    bus drivers. This self taught system is just plain crazy.
    2) The introduction of the tachograph system to all lorries and buses.
    Thus recording information as regards to the drivers working hours but also
    at what speed the vehicle is travelling at any given time during its
    journey. If these regulations are enforced rigidly, as in Europe, falling
    asleep at the wheel through excessive working hours should cease.

    However this is Thailand I cannot see this level of control being implemented

  2. #2
    Member

    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Last Online
    24-11-2013 @ 12:17 PM
    Posts
    155

    Talking

    Quote Originally Posted by Brian Stocks View Post
    Following the terrible tragedy in Saraburi where 19 bus passengers were killed following a collision with a lorry (who's driver apparently fell asleep at the wheel) it is time the transport authorities and police in Thailand seriously tackle this situation. A statement in the Bangkok Post is quoted as saying the ministry is looking into the safety of double decker buses I would point out that these types of vehicles,as used in Europe,are perfectly safe if driven in a sensible proffessional manner and that the wieght distribution when loading is taken into account. What would help in creating a safer situation is the introduction of the following:-
    1) The introduction of professional compulsory training of all HGV and bus
    bus drivers. This self taught system is just plain crazy.
    2) The introduction of the tachograph system to all lorries and buses.
    Thus recording information as regards to the drivers working hours but also
    at what speed the vehicle is travelling at any given time during its
    journey. If these regulations are enforced rigidly, as in Europe, falling
    asleep at the wheel through excessive working hours should cease.

    However this is Thailand I cannot see this level of control being implemented
    What is really scary I saw on the T/V news the remains of the bus in question
    I may be wrong but it appears the "gas bottle installation" for this vehicle was actually inside the lower deck passenger compartment (possible originally hidden behind a fibre partition of some sought) right at the base of the central stairway. No body stood a chance of getting out. Also to quote Bangkok Post only 447 of the 6000 odd buses on the road are certified. It all just beggars belief.

  3. #3
    Thailand Expat Jesus Jones's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Last Online
    22-09-2017 @ 11:00 AM
    Posts
    6,952
    These incidents have been discussed at length countless times. Unfortunately no matter what the government tries to implement it will not be followed.

  4. #4
    Gohills flip-flops wearer
    withnallstoke's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Last Online
    Yesterday @ 12:28 AM
    Location
    The Felcher Memorial Home.
    Posts
    14,285
    Quote Originally Posted by Brian Stocks
    However this is Thailand I cannot see this level of control being implemented
    Buses are for poor people, so not an effing chance.

  5. #5
    Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Last Online
    @
    Location
    Where you live
    Posts
    112
    welcome to the board brian

  6. #6
    Thailand Expat

    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Last Online
    @
    Location
    Chonburi, Thailand
    Posts
    6,431
    why is this not in the funnies section of the forum ?

  7. #7
    I am in Jail
    leemo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Last Online
    07-10-2015 @ 02:27 PM
    Location
    pty
    Posts
    2,608
    The tachograph is a sound measure, which I was discussing just yesterday with a former Oz truckie. There is the deterrent of cost to install and implement, together with technology that equips police to read the data by the roadside, plus training etc, but these are secondary and close to irrelevant.

    The main stumbling block to address, or confront, is the Thai mindset. In the extreme unlikelihood that such regulation is passed by politicians guided more by how much they can make out of it than the estimated number of lives saved by the end product, nobody honestly believes it would or could ever be properly enforced by a thoroughly corrupt Royal Thai Police.

    Call me a cynic, but this is the main obstacle to any highway/transport/health/safety regulations that might reduce political options to more than rhetoric.

    Which is why it takes no courage to predict nothing will happen aside from talk, and more of the same with unlicensed and uninsured self taught and irresponsible, drunk and tired drivers in poorly maintained killing machines allowed on public roads to randomly slaughter innocents trying to go about their business.

  8. #8
    I am in Jail
    leemo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Last Online
    07-10-2015 @ 02:27 PM
    Location
    pty
    Posts
    2,608
    A passing thought, but not sure how the police would take to their corrupt leaders implying they may be corrupt.

    Let's dream such a law is passed, money is found and system designers brought in. They could reduce dependence on the police by setting up the system to automatically relay roadside tacho data to an independent unit for analysis in seconds, which would respond as appropriate, either with an all clear or a report and binding instructions upon the roadside squad regarding fines, penalties and/or other action.

    Drop a % to plod, and it might just be the beginnings of a workable system that reduces the police role to stopping trucks, delivering data and imposing penalties, whilst easing their sensibilities with a new and outrageously legal income stream.

  9. #9
    Member

    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Last Online
    26-05-2020 @ 04:53 PM
    Posts
    802
    Think the government is banking on the new high speed railway to save the bus people. Due any time in the distant future.

  10. #10
    Thailand Expat
    Smug Farang Bore's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Last Online
    02-05-2020 @ 09:22 PM
    Posts
    3,879
    All down to money.

  11. #11
    Thailand Expat

    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Last Online
    Yesterday @ 02:14 PM
    Location
    Ballarat Australia
    Posts
    1,439
    I observed with semi horror as a car past three wide, out on the verge, the joke is the car he was passing while three wide was a police car, guess what, the responce from the police was nothing. From viewing that, I would say changing Thai police is going to take some time.

  12. #12
    Thailand Expat VocalNeal's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Last Online
    Today @ 10:21 AM
    Location
    Bangkok
    Posts
    11,574
    Quote Originally Posted by NewYork View Post
    welcome to the board brian
    With all this complaining about Thailand should do this and Thailand should do that and how bad things are in Thailand ad naseum I fixed it for you.

    Quote Originally Posted by NewYork View Post
    welcome to the bored Brian
    Thailand is what it is. Don't like it? Go to Indonesia and see how good it is there.

  13. #13
    Thailand Expat
    taxexile's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Last Online
    @
    Posts
    16,120
    the police have no concept of road safety, they are not pro active, they dont patrol looking for blatantly dangerous drivers, and even if they stop and breathalyse a drunk driver, after booking him, he will be allowed to continue his journey.

    thais dont like being told what to do, they know best, and like children, they cant see the consequences of their actions and refuse to take responsibility for them, they never learn from their mistakes, because they dont see them as mistakes, everything is the other persons fault.

    they are hopeless, and to expect any change in their behaviour or the behaviour of those who control them is futile.

    like the neanderthals, they will eventually become extinct and be replaced by a more practical and thoughtful race.


    Thailand is what it is. Don't like it? Go to Indonesia and see how good it is there.
    indeed, and as in other asian societies where life is so cheap, mistakes are not even acknowledged let alone rectified, because the task is too difficult and the people not motivated, (i.e. cant be bothered) and where those in the upper echelons have little regard for those in the lower, these societies go nowhere and achieve little and will eventually fail.
    Last edited by taxexile; 26-07-2013 at 10:05 AM.

  14. #14
    Member

    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Last Online
    24-05-2020 @ 08:08 AM
    Posts
    68
    I just moved here from Cairo. Take a look at the driving standards there!

  15. #15
    Thailand Expat
    crepitas's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Last Online
    27-03-2017 @ 08:11 AM
    Posts
    1,964
    it is what it is guys:

    ....self serving apathy with a bucket full of photo op rhetoric

  16. #16
    ding ding ding
    Spin's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Last Online
    @
    Posts
    12,607
    Quote Originally Posted by taxexile
    even if they stop and breathalyse a drunk driver, after booking him, he will be allowed to continue his journey.
    vast majority spend a night in cells and see judge in the morning.

    Not sure where you are getting your info from?

  17. #17
    Thailand Expat

    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Last Online
    @
    Location
    Chonburi, Thailand
    Posts
    6,431
    Quote Originally Posted by Spin View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by taxexile
    even if they stop and breathalyse a drunk driver, after booking him, he will be allowed to continue his journey.
    vast majority spend a night in cells and see judge in the morning.

    Not sure where you are getting your info from?

    Policeman gave me a lift back to my car so I could drive home....... but then I had to pay the "on the spot fine" for him to agree to do this.
    Quote Originally Posted by Butterfly View Post
    let me explain simply 100MB != 1GB RAM

  18. #18
    Thailand Expat
    taxexile's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Last Online
    @
    Posts
    16,120
    i know a couple of people that have been breathalysed, found to be over the limit, then asked to drive to the police station so they can pay the fine there.

  19. #19
    Member

    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Last Online
    24-11-2013 @ 12:17 PM
    Posts
    155

    Smile Thailand Road Safety

    Having lived in Thailand for several years (having worked and lived in Indonesia, Vietnam,Singapore and many arab countries during my lifetime) I do not have a problem driving here. Due to the general low density of the traffic and lack of enforcement cameras etc (which one is constantly on the look for in UK and Europe) driving in Thailand is generally quite relaxing once one has mastered some of their strange driving rules and habits. My comments were purely aimed at public transport vehicles where the paying passenger has absolutely no say in his life being put in danger by irresponsible unprofessional bus drivers. I cannot see any real change happening here ever, life is cheap (look at the compensation amounts given to persons involved in that terrible bus tragedy) compared to the cost of making the passenger transport system safe.
    As regards to Thai attitudes to responsibility, here there are only three ways to do anything, The Wrong way, The Right way and the Thai way. need I say more, one just goes with the flow and everything works out in the end somehow!

  20. #20
    Thailand Expat
    Mid's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Last Online
    @
    Posts
    1,413
    Double deck buses in trouble
    Wanwisa Ngamsangchaikit

    BANGKOK, 21 April 2014: Thailandís Network of Road Safety and transport academics have called on the Ministry of Transport to phase out the use of double-deck buses.

    The buses that are considered unstable on twisty roads, or when braking under stress. There has been a series of high profile accidents involving the buses in recent months.

    According to the network, drivers of double-deck buses have no experience especially on routes through hills in North Thailand. They are also accused of driving buses at speeds that compromise stability in the event they need to brake suddenly.


    The call by the Network of Road Safety and academics came just days before millions of Songkran holiday makers boarded buses to travel up-country.

    The Network of Road Safety said road mishaps during the past five months showed that fatalities were the highest on double-deck buses. It reported that 97 bus passengers had died since late last year.

    The Land Transport Department usually recruits privately owned double-deck buses to supplement its fleet. But there also many of the double deck buses in the fleets of companies that operate under a Land Transport Department franchise.

    Some private companies such as Siam First Tour are gradually replacing the double deckers with single deck buses on routes to the North. Of the three nightly departures from Chiang Rai, the company uses a single deck bus on its 1730 departure, while two later departures use double deck buses. A company official said the single deck bus is the companyís newest arrival with 32 VIP seats.

    Ultimately, the government will ban double deck buses, but will need to give operators time to replace their fleets. The buses taken out of commission will be sold to other private firms that offer charters to groups and tour companies.

    A standard double-deck bus weighs about 18 tonnes and is 4.5 metres high. It can carry up to 50 passengers, while a single-deck bus weighs 15 tonnes and is about 3.8 to 4 metres high, carrying up to 40 passengers.

    Mr Chadchart plans to limit the height of all passenger buses to 4 metres in the future.

    At present, there are about 6,200 double-deck buses registered nationwide. Of them, about 1,700 are scheduled buses, while the rest are charter vehicles.

    The minister also identified seven highways which he said are unsafe for double-deck buses to operate on.

    They are: Tak-Mae Sot; Phitsanulok-Phetchabun; Kabin Buri-Pak Thong Chai; Ang Thong-Sing Buri-Chai Nat section of the Asian Highway; Rangsit-Saraburi; Krabi-Phangnga; and Chiang Mai-Mae Hong Son.

    ttrweekly.com

  21. #21
    Thailand Expat Jesus Jones's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Last Online
    22-09-2017 @ 11:00 AM
    Posts
    6,952
    Yet another gruesome accident this morning just before 'The Circle' shopping center, not too far from Siam University. As I was driving down the slow moving traffic there was a body covered and body parts covered stretching 30ft with blood trails the width of truck tires. As i commented to my wife the person had been hit by a truck, about 100ft down was a truck with a motorcycle stuck in its left front wheel.

    I've seen these accidents far too often that leave me feeling immune to the shock. It's far too common. News vans were on the scene so I guess it will be on the news today.
    You bullied, you laughed, you lied, you lost!

  22. #22
    Newbie
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Last Online
    23-06-2014 @ 11:45 AM
    Posts
    32
    First off many bus drivers have no driver education what so ever. I lived on an isnad in Thailand I went for my "test". I sat on a cardboard box with a steering wheel and the instructor told me to turn left turn right, back up, I had to look im my imaginary mirriors and press the gas and brake. This went on for a few mintues. He said I passed and I had my license. This was in 2002.

  23. #23
    Thailand Expat
    rickschoppers's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Last Online
    @
    Location
    Thailand
    Posts
    7,174
    We all drive at our own risk in Thailand, as we do in our own homelands. Accidents will continue to happen, just more frequently per capita in places like Thailand, India, Cairo, or any other country where road safety is not enforced.

  24. #24
    Thailand Expat
    Smug Farang Bore's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Last Online
    02-05-2020 @ 09:22 PM
    Posts
    3,879
    We used to regularly go out of our shop on Sukhumvit road with a bucket of water to wash down the road after another bike driver had crashed.

  25. #25
    Thailand Expat Pragmatic's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Last Online
    @
    Location
    Last but who gives a shit.
    Posts
    12,431
    Quote Originally Posted by Smug Farang Bore
    We used to regularly go out of our shop on Sukhumvit road with a bucket of water to wash down the road after another bike driver had crashed.
    What changed?

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •