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  1. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by Capex View Post
    Not too sure whether I should respond to this one as the OP has the usual newbie view of boats. Anyhow, here goes (tin hat on!)
    Firstly, the boats that you are looking at are OLD. That means that they may contain problem within their structures relating to age.
    Second, they are fitted with fresh water gasoline engines that will dissolve like a Disprin in seawater.
    Thirdly, they will all have 12 volt - 110 volt electrics. Try getting 110 volt parts and spare in this country.
    Finally (here endeth the lesson!!) once you get it here, all the parts and materials you need to repair the boat, will have to be purchased at full retail value including VAT and import duties etc. This makes it an expensive repair job.
    Regarding importing the boat, there are company's such as Peters and May that have regular sailings between both east and west coast of the US to Asia. (Google is your friend).
    The person to arrange Thai registration and importation (7% VAT is all thats payable.)is a lady named Ta. Email: the yachts at hotmail dot com
    Capex I hope that tin foil hat not to tight, let's look at your post & thank for your help.

    The view of a new baby when it come to boats,
    ( please look at post #15-#19 )

    Firstly, the boats that you are looking at are OLD
    ( 1993 Chris Craft 380 Continental )

    Second, they are fitted with fresh water gasoline engines
    ( for the people who don't know about fresh water engines, They circulate fresh water through a heat exchanger this is so the salt water is not circulated through your engine)
    I hope this helps with the question about fresh water cooled engines.

    Thirdly, they will all have 12 volt - 110 volt electrics. Try getting 110 volt parts and spare in this country.
    ( this is not a problem if it land power then use a Transformer 220v to 110v 4,000Baht)

    Finally (here endeth the lesson!!) once you get it here, all the parts and materials you need to repair the boat
    ( as for fibreglass boats materials I have that covered post #15- #19, the mechanical side is the engines & have a problem it to costly then adapt a Japanese imported engine).

    Capex thank you for your input & you have giver me good advice
    Last edited by Ratchaburi; 03-10-2014 at 02:51 PM. Reason: I forgot the thirdly peace about using Transformer

  2. #27
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    "Second, they are fitted with fresh water gasoline engines
    ( for the people who don't know about fresh water engines, They circulate fresh water through a heat exchanger this is so the salt water is not circulated through your engine)
    I hope this helps with the question about fresh water cooled engines."


    Ratchi - I'd double check about the heat exchanger(s). Many of the freshwater boats were built for the lakes and push the raw water right through the engine for cooling - no heat exchanger supplied.

    If it does have a heat exchanger - a fresh water boat is the best - it never had to endure the salt.

    Hope you enjoy replacing/repairing stringers, decks, bulkheads and transoms though. The old girls tend to rot from the inside out. Disassembling the interior or engine compartment to get at the rot is the beginning of the fun.

    There is usually a good reason that nobody wants these boats.

    If you still are bent on purchasing one - spring for a proper marine surveyor to assess it before you take the plunge. For a few hundred bucks it would be cheap insurance. You'll have at least have a sense of what you're up against.

  3. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by Capex
    There is no import duty. Only 7% VAT is payable (plus the other costs that Customs come up with but using an agent generally mitigates some of that).
    I failed to add that the boat was purchased by my friend late 90's so hence in his case the import duty at the time was 200%.

    As the 52ft boat cost him around 500,000.00 Pounds it was of course not feasible for him to formally import it.

    Anyway here are the details:

    Importing your Boat

    1. In order to import the boat into Thailand, we must look at the tax incurred. Although the Customs duty is now set at 0%, value-added tax (VAT) of 7% must be paid on the CIF value of the vessel (cost + insurance + freight). The Customs officer has the right to question the declared value of the vessel, if he feels it is too low, and reject it. He is not required to accept the declared value even if it is supported by a Deed of Sale or receipt. If the vessel is not new, there may be room, however, to negotiate its value depending on the present condition of the boat.

    2. The first stage in the importation procedure is to obtain an import permit for any telecommunications equipment that may be on board before the vessel is imported, if this was the case. Documents required at this stage include details concerning the equipment; a photo of same; an invoice showing the price of the vessel; a copy of the vesselís registration (or the builderís certificate); and a copy of the importerís identification papers (Thai ID card, passport or company incorporation documents). Time required for this stage: 4-6 weeks.

    3. At this point, the vessel may be brought into Thailand, following normal procedures. The importer should have the Original Port Clearance from the last port of call; the Crew List with the passports; and the Passenger List with passports. The Declaration of Import must be made within 24 hours of berthing in Thai waters.

    4. After the arrival of the vessel has been declared, customs import formalities must be completed, and for this the following documents need to be presented: invoice with names of buyer & seller; details about the vessel, its value, weight, engine; inventory list of equipment on board; Bill of Sale; vessel registration or Builderís certificate; photographs of vessel; and identification documents of importer (individual or company). If documents are complete, the process can be finished within 3 days.

    5. We must then proceed to the Thai flag registration, requiring another 5 days if the application paper work is complete. At this final stage, we will need: the import license; the Customs Declaration form; the original VAT tax receipt; the form indicating registration in another country has been cancelled (if applicable); the Thai vessel name; and other documents submitted earlier at previous stages.

    Note: should a company be the importer into Thailand, a minimum 70% of the shareholders of the company, and over 50% of its directors, must be Thai nationals.

    Other Certificates

    Boat inspection certificates, license renewals, license re-registrations, boat name changes, etc. are similarly prepared, submitted to the Thai Marine Office; followed by a visit from a boat inspector; and eventual approval. If the inspection raises issues that need to be remedied, a follow-on inspection will be scheduled to confirm the issues have been resolved to the satisfaction of the inspector.

    The Marine Office can also receive applications for certificates for foreign national skippers; renewal of seamenís book; application for new seamenís book or a substitute book (if the original was lost); and transfers of boat registration.

  4. #29
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    Now let look at the engine in some boats.
    This one below is fresh or salt water cooled as to what water you are sailing on.




    Now for a fresh water cooled engine is this one below ( look a cap to top up the water)


  5. #30
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    2000 MAXUM 2800 SCR


    Current bid:
    US $10,000.00 Approximately THB324,548.88
    Reserve not met

    [ 12 bids ]


    Item specifics


    Condition: Used

    Year: 2000

    Use: Salt Water

    Make: MAXUM

    Engine Type: Twin Inboard/Outboard

    Model: 2800 SCR

    Engine Make: MERCRUISER

    Type: CRUISER

    Engine Model: 4.3 LITER V6

    Length (feet): 30

    Primary Fuel Type: Gas

    Beam (feet): 10

    Fuel Capacity: 76 - 100 Gallons

    Hull Material: Fiberglass

    For Sale By: Private Seller

    Trailer: Not Included
    Now looking at the Spec's on this boat it has 2 X 4.3 litre V6 engine. the picture look like a 2.7 litre 4 cylinder engine to me.





  6. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by cptw View Post
    "Second, they are fitted with fresh water gasoline engines
    ( for the people who don't know about fresh water engines, They circulate fresh water through a heat exchanger this is so the salt water is not circulated through your engine)
    I hope this helps with the question about fresh water cooled engines."


    Ratchi - I'd double check about the heat exchanger(s). Many of the freshwater boats were built for the lakes and push the raw water right through the engine for cooling - no heat exchanger supplied.

    If it does have a heat exchanger - a fresh water boat is the best - it never had to endure the salt.

    Hope you enjoy replacing/repairing stringers, decks, bulkheads and transoms though. The old girls tend to rot from the inside out. Disassembling the interior or engine compartment to get at the rot is the beginning of the fun.

    There is usually a good reason that nobody wants these boats.

    If you still are bent on purchasing one - spring for a proper marine surveyor to assess it before you take the plunge. For a few hundred bucks it would be cheap insurance. You'll have at least have a sense of what you're up against.
    Thank for your help cptw, maybe a project boat would be a better word.

    Hope you enjoy replacing/repairing stringers, decks, bulkheads and transom

    cptw I'm getting a little older & fat not able to crawl around under the floor any more.
    But I can burk instruction to my works

  7. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by Loy Toy View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Capex
    There is no import duty. Only 7% VAT is payable (plus the other costs that Customs come up with but using an agent generally mitigates some of that).
    I failed to add that the boat was purchased by my friend late 90's so hence in his case the import duty at the time was 200%.

    As the 52ft boat cost him around 500,000.00 Pounds it was of course not feasible for him to formally import it.

    Anyway here are the details:

    Importing your Boat

    1. In order to import the boat into Thailand, we must look at the tax incurred. Although the Customs duty is now set at 0%, value-added tax (VAT) of 7% must be paid on the CIF value of the vessel (cost + insurance + freight). The Customs officer has the right to question the declared value of the vessel, if he feels it is too low, and reject it. He is not required to accept the declared value even if it is supported by a Deed of Sale or receipt. If the vessel is not new, there may be room, however, to negotiate its value depending on the present condition of the boat.

    2. The first stage in the importation procedure is to obtain an import permit for any telecommunications equipment that may be on board before the vessel is imported, if this was the case. Documents required at this stage include details concerning the equipment; a photo of same; an invoice showing the price of the vessel; a copy of the vesselís registration (or the builderís certificate); and a copy of the importerís identification papers (Thai ID card, passport or company incorporation documents). Time required for this stage: 4-6 weeks.

    3. At this point, the vessel may be brought into Thailand, following normal procedures. The importer should have the Original Port Clearance from the last port of call; the Crew List with the passports; and the Passenger List with passports. The Declaration of Import must be made within 24 hours of berthing in Thai waters.

    4. After the arrival of the vessel has been declared, customs import formalities must be completed, and for this the following documents need to be presented: invoice with names of buyer & seller; details about the vessel, its value, weight, engine; inventory list of equipment on board; Bill of Sale; vessel registration or Builderís certificate; photographs of vessel; and identification documents of importer (individual or company). If documents are complete, the process can be finished within 3 days.

    5. We must then proceed to the Thai flag registration, requiring another 5 days if the application paper work is complete. At this final stage, we will need: the import license; the Customs Declaration form; the original VAT tax receipt; the form indicating registration in another country has been cancelled (if applicable); the Thai vessel name; and other documents submitted earlier at previous stages.

    Note: should a company be the importer into Thailand, a minimum 70% of the shareholders of the company, and over 50% of its directors, must be Thai nationals.

    Other Certificates

    Boat inspection certificates, license renewals, license re-registrations, boat name changes, etc. are similarly prepared, submitted to the Thai Marine Office; followed by a visit from a boat inspector; and eventual approval. If the inspection raises issues that need to be remedied, a follow-on inspection will be scheduled to confirm the issues have been resolved to the satisfaction of the inspector.

    The Marine Office can also receive applications for certificates for foreign national skippers; renewal of seamenís book; application for new seamenís book or a substitute book (if the original was lost); and transfers of boat registration.

    Thank LT for the information & I think that this information more for boat sailing into Thailand waters.

    Thank every one for your help & keep it coming

  8. #33
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    • tem condition: Used
      Time left:
      Time left: 7d 16h (Oct 10, 2014 17:00:00 PDT)

      Current bid:
      US $3,625.00 Approximately THB117,523.10

      [ 26 bids ]

    Details about 1983 Silverton 34 Convertible




  9. #34
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    1988 SEARAY EXPRESS

    SEARAY 39' EXPRESS - w/DIESELS


    Price:
    US $44,000.00 Approximately THB1,426,487.28

    Buy It Now





  10. #35
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    cptw I'm getting a little older & fat not able to crawl around under the floor any more.
    But I can burk instruction to my works [/quote]



    That is the better option - good luck with the project. It can be a labor of love if you find the right boat.

    Where would you keep/use it if you're in Ratchaburi?

  11. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by cptw View Post
    cptw I'm getting a little older & fat not able to crawl around under the floor any more.
    But I can burk instruction to my works


    That is the better option - good luck with the project. It can be a labor of love if you find the right boat.

    Where would you keep/use it if you're in Ratchaburi?[/quote]

    I have seen 40ft anchored near Photharam in the Mae klong & have friends are building a house on the river in Photharam, but a long way from the ocean.
    There is a Tammy lift near Pranburi 1 1/2 hours south from me.
    I will be looking at the height from the Keel to the gunwale to the top of the deck, taking the windscreen & radar tower off.
    Then take the engine out to see what size of boat I put on her side & drop into 40ft open top.
    Of cause I will need a cradle to sit the boat in.

  12. #37
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    Ratch, LT's mention of Langkawi and the subsequent discussions about replacement parts reminded me that Langkawi is a tax free port. It's the wrong side of the peninsular for you, but if you did find that you needed to do a major refit (new engines, electronics etc) then it could be worth running the boat over there as everything can be imported into Langkawi tax free.

    Obviously, being the civic minded person you are, you would declare the cost of the refit to customs upon your return to Thailand and pay the necessary duties, unless of course it happens to slip your mind...

    With regards to your plan for shipping in an open top - I think you'll still struggle to fit much more than a 25 footer into a container. The main issue is the width of the container. They do vary a bit by a few cms, but the chart below shows the roof opening width as being a bit over 2.1 metres.



    If you assume a boat with standing headroom in the cabin would need at least 2 metres from the cabin sole to the bottom of the roof lining, you are not leaving a lot of space for structural bits of the actual boat such as, well, the hull and decks if you were to ship the boat on its side.

    I came across some pics of someone loading a boat into a container on its side

    Loading Containers vehicles/bikes/equipment: Boat Container Loading

    1) Tip the container onto its side (you can see the container door at the bottom behind the boat and the orange/yellow top reflector things on the side). Remove the axles from the boat's trailer.



    2) Slide the boat into the container and lash it securely to the side with lots of padding between the boat's gunwhale and the container floor:



    3) Tip the container back up:



    4) Chuck in all the bits and bobs you've had to remove to get the boat in:



    I'm guessing that they used a high cube container, and the boat fills it up pretty well. Even then the boat they are shipping is not that big, definitely not the size of the ones you've spotted on eBay... However if you were to compromise a bit on size and do this then it would be a very cheap way of importing a boat.

  13. #38
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    Thanks Roobarb great stuff mate

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    Why is it easier than cars ?

  15. #40
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    Why is it easier than cars ? Sorry Stick I do know maybe one of the member can help.



    Shipping a Boat

    Shipping boats is a specialised field, and every situation is a little unique. We have tried to answer the most common questions, but don't hesitate to contact us if there is anything you would like help with.
    Do you suggest we shrink wrap vessels prior to shipment?

    This is not a yes or no answer. It depends if it’s going on deck, under-deck, and in some cases such as water loads onto container vessels it’s just physically not possible. In most cases it's money spent that could be better kept in your pocket.
    Do I have to supply the cradle for my boat?

    No, we have fully adjustable steel cradles in a number of locations around the world that we can rent to you, or if necessary build a custom cradle for your boat.
    If I have a trailer, can they use that to transport my boat?

    Yes. The trailer should be in good roadworthy condition, otherwise we may not be able to tow the trailer to port, and it costs more to transport on a low loader trailer. Also any damages resulting from a faulty trailer will not be covered by the transporter’s insurance.
    Should I remove any expensive GPS and fish finders from my boat to avoid theft?

    Yes, this is the safest option. Unfortunately theft does occur from time to time at ports, so either lock them away on the boat and have the key sent to you (you will need to be available to open on arrival), or have them sent separately.
    Do you offer Marine Insurance?

    Yes. We can insure your yacht for the full transportation, from the time we receive the yacht, until the time you take delivery of your yacht. Whether you are buying FOB or Ex works we can offer comprehensive and competitive marine insurance to cover your shipment in transit. Don't take the risk, please ask us to include this in your quotation.
    If my boat is on a trailer, do I have to include the trailer in the



    Yes, the dimensions are taken from the furthest points. So anything you can remove height or length wise will have a large impact on reducing the costs of shipping.
    My yacht has a flat keel, why do I still need a cradle?

    Whilst your yacht may sit very happily on the hard with little or no support, in the open sea a good sturdy cradle is needed. The port and shipping lines will not lift or ship a boat which has an inadequate cradle.
    How clean does my boat need to be before shipping?

    As clean as possible. The hull should be free from barnacles and other organic contamination. The inside should be vacuumed and no dirt or mud on any parts of the trailer. This is to avoid any hold ups and extra expense with quarantine.
    How do I ship my yacht’s mast?

    It’s best to ship the mast as a separate piece, and not have it attached to the yacht deck. This is because if the mast is longer than the yacht, it increases the overall length of the yacht. This would increase the boat’s volume and therefore the cost.
    What can I do to make the shipping price cheaper.

    Do everything possible to reduce the volume of the boat. ie. Can the keel be removed? Is there a radar arch or flybridge that can be removed? Consider removing any swim platforms or bowsprits. Anything you can do to reduce the size will have a big impact on the freight cost.
    Importing Boats Testimonials

    “We would strongly recommend Taurus to anyone considering moving a yacht or boat from Europe or anywhere else for that matter.”
    Importing Boats Testimonials Testimonials

  16. #41
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    Should I ship my Boat in a container, or RORO? What's the best practice?

    By Richard Hack
    One of the most common dilemmas we come across on a day to day basis, is the confusion over whether to ship boats RORO (roll on, roll off), or pack boats in containers. What's the best practice, and what delivers the lowest total cost. We say "total cost" because it's important to take all the factors into consideration, and not just the loading and shipping. Either method of shipping can deliver great results cost wise, and damage free, but there are pros and cons depending on the size of boat, and if its on a trailer or not. Below are the main Pros and cons or each method of shipping your boat.
    RORO - Roll On, Roll Off

    Pros

    • Your boat has minimal handling, and therefore less chance of damage(especially if on a trailer) because it gets just towed inside the ship and towed out again.
    • No forklifting, and trying to wedge inside a confined space.
    • All Quarantine inspection and wash can be done at the port with no need for additional costs to transfer off port.
    • Boats are shipped below deck in a secure weather proof hold.
    • Larger boats in cradles are still towed on and towed off, as these are secured to mafi trailers. Again once the boat is craned from truck or water into the cradle, there is very little physical handling of the boat.
    Cons

    • It can be more expensive, as it's charged on total volume (m3) including the trailer / cradle.
    • You can't load personal effects or other items inside the boat.
    • Theft of small items such as fish finders etc. These are best detached and stored in a lockable hatch in the boat.
    Containerisation

    Pros

    • You can load multiple small boats in one container to reduce cost.
    • Any other items you wish can be loaded in the spare space in the container. Ie personal effects or spare.
    • Cost can be cheaper as the unit cost for a container is the same irrespective of how many boats are loaded inside. Only the loading and unloading are affected.
    • More control of who handles the boat: loading and unloading are contracted by the freight forwarder, not the port company.
    Cons

    • Your boat size is limited by the door opening size of the container.
    • In most cases trailers are too wide to fit. So either the mud guards/axles have to be removed(in some cases cut off), or the boat has to be removed from the trailer and cradled inside the container.
    • Damage. Done right it's not an issue, but at a certain boat size point to many compromises need to be done to make it fit. More damage occurs trying to unload than actually load.
    • Many larger boats have to be loaded on their side due to space. This puts the weight distribution of the boat on the wrong part of the hull, and can cause hull cracks.
    • When it arrives there is often a large job of putting it back together, before you can even leave the unload depot. In most cases this reassemble can't be done on site at the un-loaders yard, so trucking costs can skyrocket to truck it in parts.
    Summary

    At the end of the day, the choice come down to ensuring the boat can be shipped damage free, and within budget. Make sure that pricing you get includes ALL the unloading charges at destination, and that its handled by one company taking responsibility for the whole process. We generally find boats over 20' are best suited to RORO because of the risk of damage.
    There is nothing more disheartening and damaging to our industry to hear of damaged boats, or people duped with a cheap container prices, only to find when it arrives there are thousands of dollars of extra charges, and many man hours putting all the parts of the boat back together.
    Richard Hack

  17. #42
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    Import boats – scams and warnings!

    By Richard Hack
    There are many benefits in importing your own boat. In particular the huge used boat market in the USA has proved to be very popular with Australian buys. But even import boats are targeted by scammers. Sadly I have helped three buys in one week, all who were scammed by the same person/company!
    Here are some common boats scam.

    • The seller will offer a really good price on a boat, and then when they find you're in Australia, or New Zealand, they offer to sell the boat all inclusive of the shipping. Once they have your money, they make excuse after excuse why it has not shipped. This can go on for months, until you get feed up and take control of the shipping at your cost. It then breaks the contract, and they walk away leaving you to pay the freight. Always arrange the shipping yourself, that way you are in control of the process, don't leave it to chance.
    • Alternatively the seller may "recommend" a freight company, and so you approach the freight company thinking its independent. In fact the freight company is a fake web site which the seller controls. The fake boat shipping company then gives a really good price on the shipping, and offers to give proof of pickup so you can pay the seller once collected. This lulls you into a false sense of security thinking your boat is safe once the freight company say they have it. You end up losing your money for the boat, and the money for the freight. The fake web site then closes down...
    So here are a few tips to keep you safe.

    • Buy from a boat dealer only. Do not by private, or from ebay. Dealers can also provide the correct documentation needed for Australian and New Zealand Customs.
    • If the boat price or the freight price is too good to be true, it most likely is. Always make sure your shipping price for your boat includes all the arrival charges such as Customs clearance and quarantine for example.
    • A great tool is the Netcraft toolbar which can tell you how old a web site is, and if there are any reports of scams. A new site is a danger and marked in RED.
    Summary:

    99.9% of boats we ship have no problems and come from honest sellers. Just take care to make sure you're not the one who gets burnt.
    Take care, Richard Hack

  18. #43
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    You are assembling a good lot of advice, most of which is helpful (not just to you but to other TDers at a later date).
    I wish you luck but still think that you may regret the exercise at the end of the day if you do go ahead with it.
    By the way, I am a Yacht Surveyor and have been involved in many international transfers, mostly Thailand to Hong Kong.
    Good luck!!!

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