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Thread: Cancer sucks

  1. #751
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    Shy Guava's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by nidhogg View Post
    Stage 4 anything does not end well I am afraid.
    There can be light at the end of the tunnel. I was diagnosed, out of the blue, with Stage 4 cancer less than 2 years ago - mainly in the colon and metastised to liver and possibly lungs. Spent almost a year doing chemo, with some Covid interruptions, which shrunk the tumours to what the surgeon deemed to be an operable size. Had an op less than a year ago to remove a section of the colon and a couple of spoonfuls of liver. Subsequent CT scans and colonoscopies show no signs of cancer. Nodules in lungs show no difference in size, indicating they may be benign.

    I know I am not out of the woods yet but hope my story gives hope to other sufferers. All treatment was at a Thai provincial hospital and, apart from some of the expensive targetted therapy chemicals, was covered by Thai Social Insurance. I opted for a private room for the few days post-op recovery after leaving ICU and this was only partially subsidised but the cost was similar to a decent hotel rate.

  2. #752
    I am not a cat
    nidhogg's Avatar
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    ^ Wishing you continued success in your fight.

  3. #753
    กงเกวียนกำเกวียน HuangLao's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by nidhogg View Post
    ^ Wishing you continued success in your fight.

    Ditto...

  4. #754
    Guest Member S Landreth's Avatar
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    Fvck off jeff

    Cancer deaths down 33 percent in 30 years

    Cancer deaths in the U.S. have decreased by 33 percent over the past three decades, according to a new study from the American Cancer Society.

    The study — published on Thursday in CA: A Cancer Journal for Clinicians — estimated that this has resulted in about 3.8 million fewer deaths.

    After peaking in 1991, the mortality rate from cancer has continued to fall over the last 30 years due to a decrease in smoking and improved cancer detection and treatment, according to the study.

    This trend continued in 2020 — the most recent year for which data is available — with another 1.5 percent decrease in mortality rates compared to 2019.

    Two times more deaths were averted among men than among women —about 2.6 million compared to about 1.2 million — which the study attributed to a higher peak and faster decline in the death rate among men. Men still have a higher mortality rate from cancer than woman, despite this rapid decrease.

    A drop in mortality rates from lung cancer has been a particular driver of this trend, the study noted. However, lung cancer remains among the most deadly forms of cancer, holding the highest death rate for both men and women.

    Cancer was the second-leading cause of death in the U.S. in 2020, behind heart disease and followed by COVID-19.
    Keep your friends close and your enemies closer.

  5. #755
    Guest Member S Landreth's Avatar
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    Aussie Scientists Solve Mystery of Rare Cancer Causes

    2,460 Australians will be diagnosed with a sarcoma in 2023 One of the most common cancers in children First-ever genetic map identifies important new genes that cause sarcoma

    Research led by Omico, the Garvan Institute of Medical Research and UNSW Sydney has generated the first comprehensive genetic map of sarcomas, identifying several new important genes that when inherited can cause this deadly cancer. The research has wide implications for people living with sarcoma and their families – allowing detection of the cancer earlier and potentially improving survival for patients.

    Sarcomas are rare cancers arising in bone, muscle, fat, or cartilage. Often occurring in children and young adults, sarcomas make up about 20% of the cancers diagnosed in people under the age of 20.

    To date, there has been little research into the genetic basis of sarcomas. Now, a new global research study has generated a comprehensive map of how the inheritance of genes may impact families affected by sarcoma. Published this week in the prestigious journal, Science*, the Australian-led research revealed that one in 14 individuals diagnosed with sarcoma carry a clinically important gene that explains why the cancer arose. In addition, the research team identified a previously unrecognised genetic pathway specific to sarcomas, opening up new cancer biology required to improve health outcomes.

    Lead author of the paper, Dr Mandy Ballinger, Group Leader at the Garvan Institute of Medical Research and Conjoint Senior Lecturer at UNSW Medicine & Health, says “The findings uncovered by this research are so important, because by understanding how individuals develop sarcomas, we move closer to earlier detection and better treatments.”

    Jonathan Granek was diagnosed with a sarcoma at 26 years of age. Jonathan says “Receiving a sarcoma diagnosis can be devastating. This research offers hope to sarcoma patients, because it increases the chance of a diagnosis at an early and curable stage.”

    Professor David Thomas, CEO of Omico, Head of the Genomic Cancer Medicine Laboratory at the Garvan Institute of Medical Research and Conjoint Professor at UNSW Medicine & Health, led the research study. Professor Thomas says “Cancer is fundamentally a genetic disease, and genomics is the key to unlocking its secrets. This international collaboration has developed new methods for mapping the genetic basis for cancer and identified new heritable pathways that increase cancer risk. These findings fill important gaps in the missing heritability of cancer.”

    Associate Professor Kathy Tucker, Clinical Lead of the Hereditary Cancer Clinic at Prince of Wales Hospital, says “Why people develop these rare and devastating cancers has been a long-standing mystery. This paper fills in many missing pieces to the puzzle, which will change clinical practice.”

    With an increased understanding of risk, patients (and their families) can be empowered to better understand and manage underlying risks, detect any tumour occurrences much earlier, and make better, and more personalised decisions about treatments that can lead to far better outcomes.

    The research used data collected from the International Sarcoma Kindred Study (ISKS) and the Genetic Cancer Risk in the Young (RisC) studies. The ISKS, established in Australia in 2008, is the largest sarcoma genetic study in the world, including more than 3,500 families recruited from 23 cancer centres in seven countries. The research has been supported by Omico, NSW Office of Medical Research, National Health & Medical Research Council, Cancer Institute NSW, Cancer Australia, the Australian and New Zealand Sarcoma Alliance, the Liddy Shriver Sarcoma Initiative, and the Rainbows for Kate Foundation.

    Omico is a non-profit nationwide network of research and treatment centres that conducts research in precision medicine, with a particular focus on rare and less common cancers. Precision medicine is a tailored approach to disease risk management and treatment that takes into account differences in people’s genetic makeup, environments, and lifestyles. It is underpinned by genetic and genomic testing (sequencing), the results of which enable better prediction, prevention, diagnosis and treatment of disease.

    Global study identifies genes that cause sarcoma | UNSW Newsroom

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