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  1. #1
    Isle of Discombobulation
    Chittychangchang's Avatar
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    The Health benefits of donating blood.

    Gave blood for the first time yesterday.

    Booked the appointment on-line for the day after.

    Turned up and filled out the questionaire then had an iron pin prick test.

    A quick chat with the friendly nurse, then an isotronic drink.

    10 minutes later i'm reclining having 1/2 a litre of pure alcohol taken out of my body



    5 minutes later due to my fitness it was all done and dusted.

    Time for the complimentary chocolate biscuits,tea and chat with another friendly nurse.

    Men can donate every 12 weeks and women every 16 weeks.

    Not just do you get the feel good factor of potentially saving someones life you also benefit yourself.






  2. #2
    Thailand Expat armstrong's Avatar
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    Not allowed to do it in Thailand. Cos of the old mad cow disease years ago.

  3. #3
    The Fool on the Hill bowie's Avatar
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    Lifelong donor - more than 2 gallons to my credit.

    Exiting military they had to fraction my blood for three years post service (turn it into plasma only) due to antimalarial prophylactic meds during deployments. Antimalarial meds interrupt the development of the plasmodium. It doesn't cure you of malaria.

    Then along came the Mad Cow Disease - I got a "Dear Donor" letter informing me that since I had lived in Europe before 1980 they would no longer accept my blood donations until they had a test for the prions that cause Mad Cow disease - letter said it would take 2-3 years to develop the test - still waiting.

    A few years ago at a Bangkok Hospital blood drive I got in line filled out all the paperwork, got the BP, temp, etc. pre-checks. Half hour or so of standing in line. The final nurse before entering to donate looks at my DOB and says I'm too old. Go get a letter from your doctor saying you can donate blood.

    Buncha idiots. First piece of paper I filled out had my DOB and age clearly indicated on the first line - why the hell did they not "disqualify" me based on age at the first step (filling out the who you are signup) or have the age limit (it was either 50 or 55 years) on the Blood Wanted Placards posted everywhere?

  4. #4
    Pedantic bastard
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    Funny one on that poster - "aids in fighting hemochromitis", as in many places that is a blood donor exclusion criteria -it is in Thailand and America apparently.

  5. #5
    Hansum Man! panama hat's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chittychangchang View Post
    Gave blood for the first time yesterday.
    Well done . . .

  6. #6
    Thailand Expat Pragmatic's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bowie View Post
    A few years ago at a Bangkok Hospital blood drive I got in line filled out all the paperwork, got the BP, temp, etc. pre-checks. Half hour or so of standing in line. The final nurse before entering to donate looks at my DOB and says I'm too old.
    Same goes for me. Why the fcuk don't they put a sign up indicating the cut off age? 60 in Ting Tong Land.

  7. #7
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    Well done Chitty. More people should follow your lead.
    I used to donate when I was younger. Back in the day you could walk in to the Red Cross clinic in Hong Kong's Ocean Centre and donate blood. At the end, you could choose a cup of tea or a San Mig beer. Happy days.
    Later, when living in the UK, I was turned down because I had visited Colombia. Then after the rquired number of years and not having died of something dreadful I tried again, but was refused because I had had acupuncture outside the NHS.
    I am pleased to report that my blood is doing a perfect job where it is. If nobody wants it, at least I offered.

  8. #8
    Thailand Expat
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    As an O neg I've got the good oil for everyone, but if I need blood in SEA I'm a goner...

  9. #9
    Thailand Expat
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    Donating blood is fine,as long as the blood goes to the NHS and not private hospitals that pay a nominal fee,though charge excessive fees.

  10. #10
    Thailand Expat David48atTD's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by armstrong View Post
    Not allowed to do it in Thailand. Cos of the old mad cow disease years ago.
    Yep ... +1

    ---

    Thai Partners Farther was a constant Donor ... we have a photo of the Princess presenting his with a Certificate for his contributions.


    Partner gives here in the West, but has to wait a couple of months after returning from Thailand before they accept her donation.

  11. #11
    Thailand Expat Dillinger's Avatar
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    Well done Chitty.....although most of these blood donors just do it for the free health check.

  12. #12
    Thailand Expat David48atTD's Avatar
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    I go for the free food.

    The Red Cross really pile it on.

    I've got to go as it's recommended not to drive afterwards.

  13. #13
    Thailand Expat jabir's Avatar
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    First I gave in los was at Nong Khai, ended up on tv as the first farang of that campaign, then a couple times in Pty till they went ageist on me.

  14. #14
    Pedantic bastard
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    Quote Originally Posted by happynz View Post
    As an O neg I've got the good oil for everyone, but if I need blood in SEA I'm a goner...
    Snap, son.

  15. #15
    Thailand Expat Pragmatic's Avatar
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    For all those with AB or B get exercising.

    Which blood group is best for health?

    Of the eight main blood types, people with type O have the lowest risk for heart disease. People with types AB and B are at the greatest risk, which could be a result of higher rates of inflammation for these blood types. A heart-healthy lifestyle is particularly important for people with types AB and B blood.



  16. #16
    Hansum Man! panama hat's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shutree View Post
    I am pleased to report that my blood is doing a perfect job where it is. If nobody wants it, at least I offered.
    Good to know!

  17. #17
    Isle of Discombobulation
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    They are pretty strict on the criteria here also, although you can give up till the age of 70.



    Booked up again for 3 months time, quite enjoyed the whole blood letting experience.

  18. #18
    Isle of Discombobulation
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    Got a text from the bloodbank today informing me where my donation has gone, thought that was a nice touch.

    The Health benefits of donating blood.-screenshot_2020-02-28-14-11-53-a

  19. #19
    Thailand Expat TheRealKW's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chittychangchang View Post

    you also benefit yourself.





    hmmmm, somewhat overstated.

  20. #20
    Isle of Discombobulation
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dillinger View Post
    Well done Chitty.....although most of these blood donors just do it for the free health check.
    Just donated again today and was complimented on my veins

    Stocks are running short atm because of C19, booked an appointment and donated 2 hours later.
    Last time there was a couple of weeks wait for an appointment.

  21. #21
    Isle of Discombobulation
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    A nice follow up email from the NHS, it appears i've helped out a Geordie this time...

    Thank you so much for your recent blood donation!
    We know that it's nice to see what happens to your blood after you donated, so we've produced this handy map that will show you every step on its journey to helping a patient.
    After your donation at Manchester your blood was taken to our manufacturing centre in Manchester where we ran all of our standard tests and then processed it into a form that can be given to a patient in need. Once it was ready it was sent to North Tees University Hospital where it will help to save or improve someone's life.
    A positive blood is shared by 1 in 3 people and is often used to make platelets for use in the treatment of cancer patients. We always need A positive blood!
    Please keep giving - every donation counts.
    Mike Stredder
    Director of Blood Donation


    Tests we carry out on your blood



    You may have noticed that each time you give a blood donation we also take blood samples.
    These samples are used to perform a range of screening tests in our laboratories.
    Most of these tests are mandatory, in other words we must carry them out on every single blood donation, whether this is your first donation or just one of the many you have given over the years.
    However, there are some additional tests that may need to be done on some donations as necessary.
    Sometimes the tests cannot be done, for example - if you give an incomplete blood donation or no blood samples are obtained, or if we cannot take a donation because of poor veins or you have low haemoglobin level for blood donation.
    The tests play a very important role in ensuring that we provide a safe blood supply to patients. We test for your blood group, so that we can select the correct group for the patient.
    We also test for infections that can be passed from donor to patient via a blood transfusion.
    The tests are carried out by computer-controlled automated machines which can test many samples both quickly and easily, so helping us to get blood to the hospitals as fast as we can.
    Any donation that is reactive on any one of the screening tests cannot be used. If your blood is reactive on any one of the screening tests, further tests are carried out to confirm whether the result indicates a true infection.
    If this is the case, we will inform you and offer you appropriate advice. If the result is significant to your health you will be asked to discuss the results with one of our clinical staff and, with your permission, we will arrange a referral to your own doctor or a specialist.
    If the test results show that you can no longer give blood, then you will be given specific advice.
    As well as checking your blood group, we test for the following infections:
    Syphilis is caused by a bacterium called Treponema pallidum. This family of bacteria can also cause tropical diseases called Yaws and Pinta. Syphilis is usually a sexually transmitted infection which, if untreated, can cause serious disease. Yaws and Pinta cause skin and joint problems.
    All three diseases are fully treatable with antibiotics. The tests we use look for specific antibodies to the bacterium. These antibodies remain in a person’s blood many years after the infection has gone.
    A positive test for syphilis often relates to an infection in the past, but we are not able to use blood as long as the test is positive.
    Hepatitis B virus (HBV)is one of several viruses that can cause inflammation of the liver (hepatitis), and sometimes liver damage.
    Hepatitis B is very common in many parts of the world where it is often transmitted from mother to child at birth or in infancy. Most donors we identify have an association with these areas of the world and appear to have been infected since childhood or in early life.
    We do two tests for the virus; one looks for a marker called hepatitis B surface antigen, which is part of the ‘coat’ of the virus; and the second looks for the virus itself, targeting the virus nucleic acid. If we find surface antigen and/or the virusnucleic acid in a donor’s blood then further tests are performed to confirm the result. Many of the donors we identify have been infected with the virus for years and are completely well.
    Sometimes we find a donor with new (acute) hepatitis B infection. Most adults who get hepatitis B have a short illness and overcome the infection.
    Occasionally we get a positive result in our hepatitis B test because the donor has recently had an immunisation against hepatitis B and not because infection is present.
    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), if untreated,affects the immune system with the development of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS). The HIV virus is transmitted sexually, can be passed from mother to baby, and by intravenous drug use.
    Once an individual becomes infected with HIV, the virus remains in the body. A person who has HIV does not necessarily have AIDS. We perform two tests for the virus; one is a combination test that looks for both a protein in the virus coat and antibody to the virus; and a second that looks for the virus itself, targeting the virus nucleic acid.
    If either or both of the tests are reactive, further tests are done to confirm the result. Unlike many other infections the antibodies produced do not protect against the virus.
    Hepatitis C virus (HCV), like hepatitis B, infects the liver and can cause inflammation and liver damage. The virus is commonly transmitted by needles, and thus may be associated with injecting drug use. Like HIV, HCV can persist in the body even when antibodies are present.
    We perform two tests for the virus, one that looks for antibody to the virus, and a second that looks for the virus itself, targeting the virus nucleic acid. If either or both of the tests are reactive, further tests are done to confirm the result.
    Like HIV, the antibodies produced do not protect against the virus. Many of the donors we identify have had the virus for years and feel completely well.
    Hepatitis E Virus (HEV) can infect both animals and humans. HEV infection usually causes no symptoms but if it does, it generally produces only a mild inflammation of the liver, hepatitis E.
    Normally the virus infection will clear by itself. However, it is known that patients whose immune system is suppressed (eg chemotherapy or transplant patients) cannot clear the virus themselves and most will develop a persistent infection which may lead to chronic inflammation of the liver.
    You will be informed if the virus is found in your donation, even though it will be short-lived, in case you start developing any signs of illness.
    Your first donation and selected subsequent donations are also tested for:
    Human T-lymphotropic virus (HTLV); a virus which infects white cells called T-lymphocytes. Like HIV, the HTLV virus remains in the body once an individual is infected, even though antibodies develop. Most people who are infected with the virus are perfectly well and never have any illness.
    Occasionally, it can cause a neurological disorder called Tropical Spastic Paraparesis (or HTLV Associated Myelopathy) or a blood disease called Adult T-cell Leukaemia. These diseases are very rare.
    The infection is found most commonly in people from Japan, the West Indies and parts of the Middle East. The virus is commonly transmitted from mother to child by breast feeding, but is also passed on by sexual contact or by intravenous drug use. We screen for antibodies against HTLV, and if the test is reactive further tests are performed to confirm the result.
    Additional tests
    Some tests are not performed on every donation. We may need to carry out additional tests depending on the donor’s individual circumstances, in particular with reference to travel or skin piercing. Extra tests are also done to provide specifically tested blood for particular types of patient.
    Malaria is caused by parasites which are transmitted by the bites of mosquitoes. The infection causes fever and is a major cause of death in some parts of the world. We test for antibodies to the malaria parasites. A confirmed positive result does not necessarily mean that the individual has active malaria, merely that they have had malaria at some time.
    T-cruzi is a parasite called Trypanosoma cruzi, found in certain parts of Central and South America. It is transmitted to humans by biting insects or from mother to baby at the time of birth, or by blood transfusion.
    Over many years, the parasite can cause damage to the muscles in the heart and intestines, leading to an illness called Chagas disease. Not all infected people become ill. Our tests look for antibodies to the infection. A donor’s place of birth and travel history determine whether the test is required.
    West Nile Virus (WNV) is an infection transmitted by the bites of mosquitoes. It most often causes a mild ‘flu-like’ illness, but can also cause a more serious illness, especially in the elderly and in those with a suppressed immune system. It can be transmitted by blood transfusion from a donor who has recently been infected.
    WNV is commonly found in Africa, Western Asia, Europe, Australia, USA and Canada. The ‘season’ for this virus is between 1st May and 30th November.
    If you have visited an area where WNV is circulating, or tell us that you have previously been diagnosed with the virus, we may test your donation to make sure that your donation is free from any possible infection. We will inform you if your test shows any sign of infection.
    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) is a very common virus which causes a mild ‘flu-like’ illness. Individuals in good health make a full recovery and are usually unaware of the infection. We may test for antibodies against the virus.
    A positive test indicates that the individual has had CMV infection and may still have the virus. Having antibodies to CMV is of no significance to the health of the donor. However, for patients with a poor immune system (bone marrow recipients or small babies), CMV can cause a life-threatening illness. CMV-positive blood is safe for most patients, and donors are not informed of a positive result.
    Non-specific reactions
    Any blood sample can give a reaction in laboratory screening tests, which on further testing proves to be non-specific. Non-specific reactivity can be found in all biological tests.
    Whenever we obtain a reactive screen result we carry out additional testing to determine whether the reactivity is non-specific or true reactivity due to infection.
    Non-specific reactivity is of absolutely no significance for the health of the donor, but unfortunately may affect the eligibility of some individuals to donate: if blood samples show such reactivity it may not be possible to use the blood. If this happens to you, you will be informed.
    Our donor helpline is open for general enquiries 24 hours a day, every day of the year. If you have a non-urgent medical enquiry, please try to contact us between 9am and 5pm, Monday to Friday.
    If you have given blood and become unwell
    If you have given blood and become unwell (except for a cold or coldsore) in the two weeks following your donation, ring our donor helpline as soon as possible on 0300 123 23 23.














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