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Thread: BACK PAIN

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    BACK PAIN

    the wife suffers from back pain [lower] around 5times a year,its come to the point that ibuprofen doesn't relieve the pain anymore,so I was thinking would an infared heat lamp work,i have looked at some on that online shop,but like most they are CRAP.
    Philips uk.do have a good selection of different pain relief products,so if anyone has bought one,please could you post the details for me.
    HH.

  2. #2
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    Mate of mine swears by acupuncture, can be expensive though.

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    Thailand Expat Pragmatic's Avatar
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    Take her for a scan you tight B. Pretty cheap at the Suranaree Military Hospital.

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    I have a herniated L4-L5 disc. If I "tweak" my back (even from sneezing), I'm almost incapacitated. Can't put on socks or shoes, even putting on undies is a trial.
    Over the decades I have been through physiotherapy, heat lamps, electric stimulation, accupuncture, massage... and the thing that is the most effective, and is also preventative, is the simplest: Get your wife to walk up and down a flight of stairs 3 or 4 times, and don't sit for long anywhere during the day.

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    Thailand Expat AntRobertson's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chittychangchang
    Mate of mine swears by acupuncture, can be expensive though.
    I tried acupuncture and that cupping thing for another issue (not back pain) and it didn't seem to do much of anything for me.

    Was quite cheap here though.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Maanaam View Post
    I have a herniated L4-L5 disc. If I "tweak" my back (even from sneezing), I'm almost incapacitated. Can't put on socks or shoes, even putting on undies is a trial.
    Over the decades I have been through physiotherapy, heat lamps, electric stimulation, accupuncture, massage... and the thing that is the most effective, and is also preventative, is the simplest: Get your wife to walk up and down a flight of stairs 3 or 4 times, and don't sit for long anywhere during the day.
    she is alright standing,like right now she is brushing up the leaves in the garden,but she does sit like most if not all thais,in an arm chair with her back resting on one arm,legs hanging over the other arm, and playing with her I.MOBILE for hrs.on end.
    she has had a back scan,negative,i think its her PURSE TOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO HEAVY.maybe the problem comes when she spends MONEY that always gives her a headache,yesterday she went and bought a WATER BOTTLE.and DIFELENE TABS.
    and before someone say,s she has had the CHANGE.

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    ^Used to have back pain when I was in my early 20's from a sports injury. Acupuncture and heat lamp treatment mitigated, but did not stop the pain.
    Thankfully, I think I just healed up naturally, without lasting damage. A good quality firm bed and mattress (and sofa) helps also.

    One tip I did get from a physio, that seems to work well for general health of the vertebrae is to hang from a doorway or pull up bar (or any horizontal frame) for 20 seconds or so. 2-3 times / day. -Feet don't have to be off the floor, just support your weight by hanging from your arms. This supposedly 'de-compresses' the spine, after sleeping or sitting in the same posture for a long time.

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    Quote Originally Posted by kmart View Post
    ^Used to have back pain when I was in my early 20's from a sports injury. Acupuncture and heat lamp treatment mitigated, but did not stop the pain.
    Thankfully, I think I just healed up naturally, without lasting damage. A good quality firm bed and mattress (and sofa) helps also.

    One tip I did get from a physio, that seems to work well for general health of the vertebrae is to hang from a doorway or pull up bar (or any horizontal frame) for 20 seconds or so. 2-3 times / day. -Feet don't have to be off the floor, just support your weight by hanging from your arms. This supposedly 'de-compresses' the spine, after sleeping or sitting in the same posture for a long time.
    I am just relaying all the replies to her,so the above reply from KMART regarding supporting your weight,we do have a complete GYM at home which does include a
    HOME GYM so would some weight lifting be any benefit,the cataloge show 12 different exercises.

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    Quote Originally Posted by headhunter View Post
    ibuprofen doesn't relieve the pain anymore,s
    Celebrex with a mydocalm wll work and is cheap and over the counter in Thailand.....best to find out what the cause is work that out or she'll find he's upping the dosage of these too.

  10. #10
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    Dr Mark Porter: The golden rules for managing back pain
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    People with musculoskeletal complaints such as back pain are to have faster and easier access to physiotherapists at their GP surgery as part of a programme that is being rolled out by NHS England. I can’t wait for a physio to join our team. Nor can my patients with back trouble, who can wait weeks to see a physio, by which time their symptoms have often resolved.

    Acute back pain (defined as lasting less than six weeks) is typically caused by sprains, strains or a bulging disc and — as any honest GP or physio will tell you — tends to get better despite what the NHS has to offer rather than because of it. As long as people follow a few golden rules (see below), time tends to be the best healer. However, not all back trouble is quite so innocent and doctors and physios are trained to look for red flags that hint at more sinister problems. If your case has any of these features, please seek advice.

    Pain following trauma While some physical activity — anything from laying a patio to moving heavy furniture — often precedes the onset of acute back pain, more significant trauma such as a fall or road traffic accident increases the chances of a fracture.

    Age under 20 or over 55 While back pain is extremely common — four out of ten adults will have at least one episode per year — it is comparatively unusual in children and teenagers. It also pays to be wary of new-onset pain in older people (those over 55 who haven’t been prone to back trouble before).

    Back pain in anyone with a significant past medical history This includes cancer, osteoporosis (or anything that predisposes to weaker bones such as prolonged use of steroids) and/or a weakened immune system (eg due to chemotherapy or HIV). We also tend to be wary of anyone with deformity of the spine such as kyphosis (curvature causing stooping forward) or scoliosis (where the curve is to one side or the other).

    Pain in the upper half of the spine Acute back pain normally originates in the small of the back (the lumbar region) and discomfort higher up the spine is suggestive of something other than a simple strain, sprain or prolapsed disc — something like an inflammatory type arthritis.

    Pain that is never relieved by rest Some cases of sciatica — nerve pain that tends to run into the hip and leg caused by a bulging or burst intervertebral disc — may be worse in specific positions that may include lying in bed at night. However, in general, night and early morning pain, or discomfort that can’t be relieved by getting into different positions, warrants an appointment with a doctor or physio.

    Feeling unwell Some people will put their back out at the same time as they succumb to a bout of flu or some other infection, but the combination of back pain and symptoms such as high temperature, general malaise and/or unexplained weight loss should ring alarm bells.

    Any symptoms that suggest significant spinal cord/nerve compression Occasionally, a bulging disc, or other problems in the spine ranging from bleeding to tumours, can compress the cord or nerves to such an extent that they lead to loss of feeling and paralysis. This is most common in the lower part of the spine, and anyone developing symptoms such as progressive weakness in the legs, an abnormal gait, difficulty passing urine and tingling or numbness in the saddle area between the legs should seek medical help urgently. If pressure is not relieved, the damage can be irreversible. Time is of the essence.
    You can read the latest guidance on managing low back pain and sciatica at nice.org.uk

    Pain relief and practical tips for back problems
    ● If you have a bout of back pain, the latest guidance from Nice advises against taking to your bed. Keep as active as you can.

    ● Avoid paracetamol (it is often useless in back pain). Ibuprofen, or equivalent prescription-only anti-inflammatories such as naproxen, tend to work best, but watch for side-effects such as indigestion.

    ● Consider codeine only if ibuprofen-type drugs are ineffective or not tolerated. Stronger opioids such as tramadol are best avoided in back pain.

    ● The evidence that low-dose diazepam relieves muscle spasm is mixed. I rarely prescribe it.

    ● Sciatica/prolapsed disc pain requires a different approach and tends to respond better to drugs such as amitriptyline that specifically target neuralgia.

    ● Exercises, massage and manipulation can help sprains and strains, but avoid supportive belts or corsets.
    https://www.thetimes.co.uk/past-six-...pain-vnbhg9j7n

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    Hangin' Around cyrille's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AntRobertson View Post
    I tried acupuncture and that cupping thing for another issue (not back pain) and it didn't seem to do much of anything for me.

    Was quite cheap here though.
    Something cheap that doesn't work?

    In Thailand?


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    I have been bothered with back problems for the past 40+ years, I try visit a GOOD Chiropractor 3 or 4 times a year, note I say good, there's some idiots out there. They get everything lined up as it should be, hanging from a doorway will do similar though not as well, when back has been really bad have used Acupuncturist here in Udon, found one that is very good.

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    Twice I have had really bad back pain. Both times sorted as quick as by Chinese chiropractors (both times fixed in Singapore).

    I did foolishly try a proper traditional Thai massage one of the times. Bad mistake.

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    Everybody has a different experience. There are many sufferers and a squillion different suggestions on the Internet.

    I have had lower back pain on and off over 20 years. From time to time I get lower back muscle spasms which are incapacitating.

    Best solution is avoidance. I don't rake leaves or bend to pick up anything heavy. I do some stretching exercises every day. I try to stand up and walk around after 30 minutes or so sitting at a desk. I still have problems.

    For me, low dose Diazepam is useful. I don't take it unless I absolutely have to. A doctor's prescription is required pretty much everywhere, and they don't like to prescribe it.

    Over the counter in Thailand I buy Diclofenac. The local pharmacist also sells me a tablet combining Paracetamol and Orphenadrine Citrate, which can be taken together with the Diclofenac. The combination seems to help. I only take that when I have a problem, rarely more than 2 or 3 days in a row.

    In my case, the number one prevention and pain reduction solution is acupuncture. I now try to have that once a week and it definitely helps. The Chinese docs like to do cupping too. My feeling it is that is is useless for me. Moxybustion too. But they like to do it.

    I have used the acupuncturist in Udon, probably the same one as mentioned earlier. He is quite good. I have found others around Isan, all have been okay.

    What doesn't work in my case is Thai massage.

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    Thailand Expat AntRobertson's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cyrille View Post
    Something cheap that doesn't work?

    In Thailand?
    Good point. Well made.

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    I used to get back pain and couldn't figure out what was causing it but a change of mattress cured it, got one of those tempur ones cost about 2k though but worth every penny.

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    Back pains can have a myriad of reasons. What is good for one kind may be dangerous for another.

    One thing that is counter intuitive is training of the stomach muscles. Back pain can be and is frequently caused by imbalance of muscles in the front and in the back. Back muscles pull and the front muscles are not strong enough to balance that. But it is better to learn this under supervision so that the stomach muscle training is not harmful for the back.

    Unfortunately my back pains can not be treated easily. It would need major surgery that is recommended not to do until it becomes unavoidable because there is a risk of permanent paralysis of the legs involved. But my doctor just reminded me that the day I need to take that risk will come. Not being able to be up for much more than 1 hour a day severely limits what one can do on a vacation.
    "don't attribute to malice what can be adequately explained by incompetence"

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    Yoga swing



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    Hmmm........now, if I could just alter the angle of the dangle somewhat, apply some moisturizer, and....

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    ความรู้ลึกลับ HuangLao's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chittychangchang View Post
    Mate of mine swears by acupuncture, can be expensive though.
    Not in the real world.

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    The Fool on the Hill bowie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Takeovers View Post
    risk of permanent paralysis
    risk vs. reward, quality of life is the determining factor.


    For me, six ruptured disk; chiropractor, orthopedist, pain meds, epidurals, infection, spinal surgery, USD $450k total, about 18 months

    lessons learned, protect your back and carry medical insurance

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    [at][at][at][at][at][at] SKkin's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by taxexile View Post
    Stronger opioids such as tramadol are best avoided in back pain.
    Well that's just great...that's what I've been on the past two months. For this:

    Quote Originally Posted by taxexile View Post
    something like an inflammatory type arthritis.
    Severe arthritis they said...but it's also in my hips and knees. Possibly a pinched nerve in back as well.

    Getting a lumbar MRI Monday to determine.

    Besides the Tramadol, have gone the physical therapy route and a Depo-Medrol injection so far...didn't help. Maybe acupuncture next, if the pain clinic doesn't help.


    Good luck hh, back pain is a bitch.

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    I got a prescription for Tramadol just yesterday. I have never used it before. According to my doctor this is the low end of opioids. She would not even consider giving me any other opioid.

    I got to admit I am going to use it as a lifestyle drug. I can handle my every day life and tasks very well with much less powerful pain killers or even without. But my November visit in Thailand was really devastating in the limitations of what I could do. I hope Tramadol will make future travel more enjoyable, but will rarely touch it in every day life.

    BTW, do I have to expect any problems bringing Tramadol to Thailand or Vietnam or the Philippines? I will have my prescription with me of course.

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    [at][at][at][at][at][at] SKkin's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Takeovers View Post
    According to my doctor this is the low end of opioids. She would not even consider giving me any other opioid.
    Same thing my doctor told me. She is also reluctant to give me a refill again. The only thing it has really done for me is help me sleep better at night. Not that great for the pain. Then again the pain could be much worse if I wasn't taking it. Dunno...

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    This guy is usually on the money for tips and physio advice for joints and muscular problems:


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