Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 26 to 30 of 30
  1. #26
    Thailand Expat
    Shutree's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2017
    Last Online
    Today @ 10:19 AM
    Location
    One heartbeat away from eternity
    Posts
    1,568
    Quote Originally Posted by Mendip View Post

    This is the plant with a bunch of baby 'makuear' developing. They will get to about... well... tomato size!

    I ate a handful of those at lunch yesterday, about the same size as those in your picture. They were amongst the 'Isan salad' that accompanied a plate of duck laab.

    No photos of that. Not much one can do to make a plate of laab photogenic. Tasty though.

  2. #27
    Member
    tunk's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2015
    Last Online
    Today @ 04:14 PM
    Posts
    272
    Anybody can stack these blocks, hell my daughter likes to stack these blocks. Heres how you build a form to pour the cap, the cap is what finishes it off. The outside has a 3/4 inch overhang, extra work but makes it look right.Diy raised bed garden-dscf0385-jpg

  3. #28
    Member
    Tommy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Last Online
    Today @ 07:21 AM
    Location
    Hua-Hin
    Posts
    62
    thanks for the detailed photo. I saw you used fencing steel in the concrete. I assume that is strong enough.

    I did some concrete pouring myself, last year, and the results were quite bad (no smooth finish). I guess more practice is needed.

  4. #29
    Member
    tunk's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2015
    Last Online
    Today @ 04:14 PM
    Posts
    272
    The fencing is very strong, but the only reason I used it is because I happen to have some odds and ends laying around. No reason to go buy rebar and give the fencing to the bin man. Pouring cement does take practice and is a lot of work, it is also very rewarding because it will last a lifetime. Anybody that thinks it is easy has never really mixed and poured their own, they have only watched it being done. I stick to a 3/2/1 mix. 3 stone, 2 sand and 1 cement with very good results. Here is a valuable tip I learned from Thai man. First mix your sand and cement, then add water to make a nice soup. Add your stone last. If you put your stone in first they lay on the bottom and you have to pull them up from the bottom. Adding the stone last they will almost float in the soup and mix much easier. When you pour use your garden rake to tap, tap, tap to make sure your stone are not in a pile and sticking up and try to screed from two directions if you can. Good luck next time.

  5. #30
    Member
    Tommy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Last Online
    Today @ 07:21 AM
    Location
    Hua-Hin
    Posts
    62
    Quote Originally Posted by tunk View Post
    The fencing is very strong, but the only reason I used it is because I happen to have some odds and ends laying around. No reason to go buy rebar and give the fencing to the bin man. Pouring cement does take practice and is a lot of work, it is also very rewarding because it will last a lifetime. Anybody that thinks it is easy has never really mixed and poured their own, they have only watched it being done. I stick to a 3/2/1 mix. 3 stone, 2 sand and 1 cement with very good results. Here is a valuable tip I learned from Thai man. First mix your sand and cement, then add water to make a nice soup. Add your stone last. If you put your stone in first they lay on the bottom and you have to pull them up from the bottom. Adding the stone last they will almost float in the soup and mix much easier. When you pour use your garden rake to tap, tap, tap to make sure your stone are not in a pile and sticking up and try to screed from two directions if you can. Good luck next time.
    thx for the tips!

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •