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  1. #26
    Thailand Expat Pragmatic's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Klondyke View Post
    Northern climate allows mushroom growing. Certain know-how is needed and market connections...
    They were a big thing here, S Buriram, a few years back but over production killed it off, as always.

  2. #27
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    Welcome to the famous TD world.

    I've been living permenantly here in Thailand for 6/7 years, time flies when having fun. TD can be fun and stimulating.

    Whem I arrived I moved into my Thai wifes comunity. She had a house, a motor bike .... which kept the initial funding small.

    Her family had two farms one with Durian/mangosteen the other with rubber. The rubber tree were considered too much work for the effort, the prices are now lower that they were when I arrived. The Durian "farm" is on a very steep sloping piece of land and a supply of water was available as they had a pipe from the upstream small river.

    Quote Originally Posted by Pragmatic View Post
    Durian trees need plenty of water
    Quote Originally Posted by NamPikToot View Post
    ^ they don't like getting their feet wet.
    You need to confirm the annual rainfall in your location. There are excellent sites on Thai weather available. This one indicates the past the weekly rainfall, which is updated daily.

    Switching from rubber to fruit trees-7d_pet090620-gif


    The weeks evaporation

    Switching from rubber to fruit trees-7d_def090620-gif


    and the subsequent water deficeit or excess.

    Switching from rubber to fruit trees-7d_rain090620-gif


    Giving a guide to soil water balance, irrigation requirements or not.

    Taking Trat province as an example the weekly figures are:

    1. Evaporation, 30 to 35 mm lost
    2. Rainfall , 40 - 70 mm gained
    3. Soil water balance, 50 - 100 mm excess

    Unless the figure is minus 30mm, no irrigation required.

    weekly Data

    Watering in the dry 6 months of the year was by utilising a hose. As they have maybe a 100 trees that task in itself was time consuming.

    Durian require approx 4mm of rain a day in the dry season. So no rain and watering is required to ensure they get enough. In the wet season there is, shall I say, a more than adequate supply so no watering required.

    So you will need access to a water supply. Those that can't run an adequte supply from an upstream supply via gravity need to pump it, which will entail a pump and fuel costs.

    My subsequent farming confirms that Durian grow faster/produce more fruits when water is applied in the dry season. Durian do not like excessive water and die. If your farm has poor drainage the durians can be planted on a raised bed. 4m in dia by 1m higher than the field is what's used around here.

    They also prefer shade when saplings. Normal Thai rubber trees, closely spaces are too dark, but if you clear a good strip they will help intitially. As the Durian matures they can survive with no shade.

    As the rubber farm became available and my wife's family were happy that I would take it over, I looked into Durian fruit management "felang style", much to local amusement initially.

    The price available from the local wholesale fruit market, an hour or so away in Chanthaburi, provided my wifes family which to them is an adequate living. If you intend to run the farm commercially you need to locate Durian buyers. At harvest time we are innundated with contractors who will harvest the farm, cut the fruit, handle the fruit to the truck, grade them and pay cash, all for a fixed price/kg of durian. The price depends on the quality grade. Locals are also available on a daly rate. It's no good having tons of Durian you can't sell. I also have coffee and cocao trees, but just for my own consumption.

    Quote Originally Posted by Pragmatic View Post
    I find plenty to do around the house and garden and seldom do I get bored. I dunno how old you are but if you are adequately financed from a pension etc I'd just sit back and enjoy your remaining years tinkering about.
    Farming Durian is not labour intensive and the only critical requirements are timing the spraying of the trees, to improve the quality and hence price achieved and harvest timing, agian the ripeness of the fruit means better grade.

    It does take 5 to 7 years for the trees to start to produce fruit.The cost of an irrigation system is easily covered by an early fruit harvest.

    [QUOTE=cyrille;4119310]The price of fruit is largely based on how difficult it is to grow.

    Price is determined by demand. Getting the Durian to market early increases the /kg price. In the years I've been the last 3 the prices have increased. Many truckloads go to the north of Thailand, due to better marketing, especially to China as it's an exotic hard to get treet. Long may it last.

    Quote Originally Posted by ifonly View Post
    She accepts that.
    You will be involved but you have may have the option to delegate if you so desire.

    Quote Originally Posted by ifonly View Post
    Just a couple Durian and Jackfruit and some others we have not decided yet.
    It sounds as if you are just wanting a few for your own use. If so it's just your climate and care. Which is easily managed.

    Quote Originally Posted by bowie View Post
    there are many things you must learn to accept, it is their way, it is their country, and, even though your way may well be better and more efficient, it ain't their way - so, don't push it, they will not change, you should accept
    I thought similar for a long time. My FIL after seeing the growth of my young Durians decided to follow my example and introduced an irrigation system of plastic pies and sprinklers. Three benefits. His watering hours are now no existent, he opens a valve, gets on with other tasks and repeats until the blocks are watered. His quality of picked fruit is more consistent. Lastly the timing of harvest can be controlled, achieved by instigating the blooming of the fruit flowers earlier. This increases his sale price by marketing earlier and also enables a shorter harvesting window.

    Quote Originally Posted by HuangLao View Post
    I might opt towards a lesser saturated
    Saturation depends on marketing and supply. The markets are eager, the prices are high. Who knows what we will see in another year.

    I was also luck to have a very helpful Thai Agriculture centre near by which is the Thai government Durian lead.

    Good luck in the future in Thailand, with your new Thai family and with whatever you decide to fill your time here with. I also have many articles and papers on Durian farming, foreign and Thai. If you want them.
    Last edited by OhOh; 16-06-2020 at 11:55 AM.
    A tray full of GOLD is not worth a moment in time.

  3. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by OhOh View Post
    Durian do not like excessive water and die. If your farm has poor drainage the durians can be planted on a raised bed
    Shouldn't be an issue since the land is on a downward slope.
    How close to each other would you recommend planting the trees?


    Quote Originally Posted by OhOh View Post
    I also have many articles and papers on Durian farming, foreign and Thai. If you want them.
    My wife and myself are eager to learn more on the subject and would happily read everything you have. Very generous offer. Thank you for the time you put into this post!

    Again, thank you all for your thoughts! The information provided is already more than I would have hoped for.

  4. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pragmatic View Post
    Believe it or not, there are food standards in the Thai restaurant trade.
    Cooked eggs go out of date.
    The Farm Father found a wholesaler who buys them and resells them.

    I have loaded, literally tonnes of them into the back of his Ute (utility truck) and fed this high source of protein to the catfish.

    Two examples of keeping the input costs down which adds to the bottom line.
    True, some Thais are experts in saving costs or getting the most out of what they have at hand. Some farrangs, too
    Interesting read, thank you!

    This forum is truly a treasure!

  5. #30
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    I posted 3 days ago in this thread but my post seem to have get lost in the Limbo or something...

    Anyway, thank you all for taking your time and giving my valuable infotmation .

    Quote Originally Posted by OhOh View Post
    I also have many articles and papers on Durian farming, foreign and Thai. If you want them.
    Both my wife and me would love to read anything you can spare. Generous offer, thank you!

  6. #31
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    Ok, 3 of my posts in this thread during the last 10 days didn't get displayed here, dunno why...Each one had quotes..

    Again, thank you everyone for taking your time and the valuable information you provided!

    @OhOh: My wife and I would love to read any information you can share with us

    I hope this post doesn't disappear to the Limbo lime the last ones I made, very frustrating...

  7. #32
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    ^Look to your inbox.

  8. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by cyrille View Post
    The price of fruit is largely based on how difficult it is to grow.

    So if I were you I'd forget about Durian.
    at this moment in time,try finding some good bananas.

  9. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by headhunter View Post
    at this moment in time,try finding some good bananas.
    Interesting you say that. A few hundred banana trees have just been planted in fields near me. It is the only banana plantation I know of round here.

  10. #35
    Thailand Expat Pragmatic's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shutree View Post
    Interesting you say that. A few hundred banana trees have just been planted in fields near me. It is the only banana plantation I know of round here.
    Soon there will be many more and next year they'll be none. It's the Thai way.

  11. #36
    Thailand Expat Pragmatic's Avatar
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    Durian.



    Did you know that...

    • it takes 5-6 years (sometimes longer) before you can harvest your first fruits;
    • it is not uncommon to see matured durian trees fail to flower, or to set fruit during fruiting season;
    • developing fruits on the tree may drop prematurely, or become misshapened and unmarketable;
    • many insect and mammalian pests attack durian and some may cause serious damage to the tree;
    • many fungal diseases attack all parts of the tree including ripen fruits on sale, and some diseases are fatal;
    • durian fruits may also suffer from physiological disorders such as "uneven fruit ripening", "wet core" and "tip burn" which make them unmarketable;
    • "two-legged" thieves can smell your ripening durian fruits miles away and steal them if you are not vigilant
    • natural calamities such as drought, fire or too much rain may happen and destroy your trees;
    • when you have a bumper harvest, so can other farmers - a glut in the market brings down prices, therefore less profits; and
    • marketing the fruits can be a bigger challenge than just producing the fruits.

  12. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pragmatic View Post
    Durian.
    I think that belongs in the Daily Cheer thread.
    :-)
    No wonder the things are expensive.

  13. #38
    Thailand Expat Pragmatic's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shutree View Post
    No wonder the things are expensive.
    On top of that, selling an unripe Durian is a jailable offence.

    Apr 26, 2018 - Those who are found selling unripe durians may be charged under the country's trademark laws and face a hefty three-year jail term as well as a fine of up to THB60,000 (US$1,900).

  14. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pragmatic View Post
    Did you know that...

    it takes 5-6 years (sometimes longer) before you can harvest your first fruits;
    Very true. Some have adopted methods that reduce the tree growth time.

    1. Irrigating newly planted saplings as opposed to relying on rainfall.
    2. Planting the saplings on a raised bed - 3m dia x 0.5m high.
    3. Planting multiple saplings on one mound. Once established the grafting of the many rooting "saplings' to the one centre saplings can increase yields of fruits.

    Quote Originally Posted by Pragmatic View Post
    Did you know that...

    it is not uncommon to see matured durian trees fail to flower, or to set fruit during fruiting season;
    Very true. Some have adopted methods that reduce the fruits failure to germinate problem . Management of irrigation rather than relying of rainfall, correct spacing of the fruit clusters - obtained by cutting off any unnecessary buds and ensuring the trees have been managed - to provide sufficient healthy canopies to support the fruit load etc.

    Quote Originally Posted by Pragmatic View Post
    Did you know that...
    developing fruits on the tree may drop prematurely, or become misshapened and unmarketable;
    Very true. Some have adopted methods, Management of irrigation rather than relying of rainfall reduce both of these problems. They are never "unmarketable" just less profitable.

    Quote Originally Posted by Pragmatic View Post
    Did you know that...
    many insect and mammalian pests attack durian and some may cause serious damage to the tree;
    Very true. Some have adopted methods, Timely spraying utilising commercial or home produced and effective sprays, that reduce both of these problems.

    Quote Originally Posted by Pragmatic View Post
    Did you know that...
    many fungal diseases attack all parts of the tree including ripen fruits on sale, and some diseases are fatal;
    Very true. Some have adopted methods, Timely spraying utilising commercial or home produced and effective sprays, that reduce both of these problems.

    Quote Originally Posted by Pragmatic View Post
    Did you know that...

    durian fruits may also suffer from physiological disorders such as "uneven fruit ripening", "wet core" and "tip burn" which make them unmarketable;
    .
    Very true. Some have adopted methods, Management of irrigation rather than relying of rainfall reduce both of these problems.

    Quote Originally Posted by Pragmatic View Post
    Did you know that...

    "two-legged" thieves can smell your ripening durian fruits miles away and steal them if you are not vigilant
    True of all crops, maybe not the odour.

    Quote Originally Posted by Pragmatic View Post
    Did you know that...

    natural calamities such as drought, fire or too much rain may happen and destroy your trees;
    Very true. Some have adopted methods, irrigation and drainage solutions, that reduce both of these problems.

    Quote Originally Posted by Pragmatic View Post
    Did you know that...

    when you have a bumper harvest, so can other farmers - a glut in the market brings down prices, therefore less profits.
    Very true. Some have adopted methods, farm management - managing an early harvest, as opposed to leaving it to Bhuddah, reduce both of these problems.

    Quote Originally Posted by Pragmatic View Post
    Did you know that...

    marketing the fruits can be a bigger challenge than just producing the fruits.
    As I have suggested above ensuring there is a market;

    1. Local buyers,
    2. Easily accessible wholesale markets, for those that have invested in suitable transport,
    3. Online wholesale or public facilities are viable. Go to online sales sites, some offer guaranteed boxes of various Durian size/quality all delivered via Kerry, Thai Post ..... others sell wholesale multi tonne loads, to local and international buyers.

    is paramount in any farming endeavour.

    I see many improvements in my local area where Thais are adopting a more managed approach to their farms and hence better tree health, fruit production, early harvest and sales methods creating better profits.

    Some foreigners are also taking on the newer now proven systems and reaping higher returns. Many stick to "Thai style, Buddha will provide" attitude though.
    Last edited by OhOh; 03-07-2020 at 03:32 PM.

  15. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pragmatic View Post
    On top of that, selling an unripe Durian is a jailable offence.
    Sellers should not try to sell unripe fruit.

  16. #41
    Thailand Expat Pragmatic's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by OhOh View Post
    Sellers should not try to sell unripe fruit.
    Currently times are hard.

  17. #42
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    some fruit trees take yrs.before they produce fruit,our pomello tree took 6yrs,lime trees are better grown in pots,banana trees pretty easy,one fruit tree producing small yellow like plums[very nice/expensive]took 8yrs,,star fruit ok,fulang ok.large lemon 2yrs.so its not easy to grow and produce.better off with some good chickens.ducks,a few pigs and a good herb garden,but dont think you will make a fortune only farangs will buy good quality produce.

  18. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by headhunter View Post
    only farangs will buy good quality produce

  19. #44
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    Hes in a world of his own, with only his rancour to keep him company.

    Hed be good company for Numpty and Chas.

  20. #45
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    Did you consider to wait with the cutting of rubbertrees, so they can provide shade for your young fruit trees?

  21. #46
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    Southern Thai province eyes Chinese market for native durian

    Xinhua | Updated: 2020-07-03 10:36

    The durian is finding an increasing following in China.[Photo/Xinhua]

    "Thailand's southern province of Pattani said it hopes the Chinese market will pick up its native grown Puangmanee durian to assist the province's economy which had been hit hard by the COVID-19 pandemic.

    Pattani launched its Puangmanee durian season on Thursday, with promotions designed to lure the lucrative Chinese market for this unique variety of the pungent fruit.

    Presiding over the opening of the durian festival called "Great durian, Puangmanee of Yarang district, the jewel of Pattani river basin," Pattani Governor Kraisorn Visitwong pledged to do his utmost to help reboot the local economy.

    The governor said told the media that farmers in the southern provinces are working towards meeting the ASEAN Good Agricultural Practice (GAP) standards in order to boost the market for native durian, rambutan, mangosteen, southern langsat and pomelo.

    Kraisorn said a huge number of Chinese people prefer to eat durians that are small in size, with smooth and creamy flesh, and with a smell that is not as pungent as larger durian varieties.

    "Before the COVID-19 air travel restrictions were imposed, we have had lots of positive feedbacks from Chinese tourists who said they like Puangmanee durian," said Kraisorn.

    He said he hopes that the native fruits in the Thai South will help boost both local farming and tourism incomes.
    Puangmanee durian is a small-sized variety weighing 1.3 to 1.8 kg when ripe."

    Southern Thai province eyes Chinese market for native durian - Travel - Chinadaily.com.cn

  22. #47
    Thailand Expat Pragmatic's Avatar
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    Durian farm/orchard near to where I live. Much work and cost has gone into the venture that they may not begin to get a return on it for 10 years. Hopefully the price remains stable until then? Good luck to them.
    What they've done is dug out 2 pits to store water. These are linked a bore hole and water channeled in from the main road adjacent. I'm not sure, but I believe electricity is supplied from panels located on the shed-like roof.
    One thing I must say is that I do not live in an area where growing Durian is common practice. So this is a first. Always has to be a first.


    Switching from rubber to fruit trees-dsc00241-jpg Switching from rubber to fruit trees-dsc00240-jpg Switching from rubber to fruit trees-dsc00243-jpg Switching from rubber to fruit trees-dsc00244-jpg Switching from rubber to fruit trees-dsc00242-jpg

  23. #48
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    Here are some photos of a Durian setup by a local young Thai guy:

    Switching from rubber to fruit trees-durian1-jpg

    He has a strip of land adjacent the road. Looking east, over those "mountains" be Cambodia.

    Switching from rubber to fruit trees-durian3-jpg

    This shows the mound, also his irrigation pipe. I've buried my pipes entirely, stops any "accidents" when cutting the grass. The spray nozzle can be seen adjacent the trunk. I've used black flexible pipes myself.

    Irrigation + mound producing a well canopied tree. Probably 3/4 years since planting out.


    Switching from rubber to fruit trees-durian2-jpg

    He had cut all the others with his cutter but this one he using a stick cutter. Maybe run out of gas.

  24. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pragmatic View Post
    Durian farm/orchard near to where I live.
    Another two Durian farms.

    Switching from rubber to fruit trees-durian-plantation-jpg

    30 + trees per row x 100 rows, a money tree in the making.

    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    A different farm with two trees growing/mound. Not sure of the expected yield as the branches in the middle will probably die off.

    Possibly ensuring at least one will reach maturity.

    Switching from rubber to fruit trees-durian-2-e-jpg

  25. #50
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chico View Post
    James McCollister be a good guy to ask.

    If you do Durian, they take around 4/5 years to bear fruit.
    In Fipperland, those trees are more profitable after 6-7 years if you cut them and sell them for their lumber. They produce decent quality lumber. And you make quick money, without getting in trouble with the law. There is a total log ban here, but fruit trees are exempted.
    I am so unlucky that if I fall into a barrel full of D*ick**s, I'd come out sucking my own thumb!

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