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  1. #101
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mendip View Post
    What a perfect excuse...
    Excellent. I have the vinyl in a long-forgotten box somehwere, I bought that very nearly 50 years ago. Where did the time go?

  2. #102
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    Mendip
    Here's a picture of my hens showing how fearful they are of my dog/s.
    So if you were to exchange your low life Korat riff raff dogs for some real gentleman Aussie trained dogs you to could let your chickens run free.

    The dogs and the chickens like that spot as it is in the drain and usually damp and always in the shade.

    My Splendid Cock-20210330_144643-jpg

  3. #103
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    I'm very envious Ootai.

    Coco and Maya, our two latest are fine with the chooks since I've been at home during their puppyhoods and have managed to train them. All it takes is a bit of effort to be honest, but sadly too much or the Thai contingent.

    The other four would kill a chicken in an instant. I could try training them now but fear we would lose a lot of chickens during the process, so I keep the chickens safe in their run.

    I would love to have the chickens roaming free around the garden every day. We have a high perimeter wall so if I clipped their wings there would be no escapees.

    That dog looks a bit Bangkaewish?

  4. #104
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mendip View Post
    That dog looks a bit Bangkaewish?
    Mendip

    I have heard the name "Bangkaew" before but never looked up to see what their story is/was.
    So I thought i should and yes I agree that there is probably some of that breed in them but they are just a bit of everything really.
    We have 3 male dogs who are litter brothers and 2 look like they are Bangkaew and the other not so much in that he is bigger and has short hair and a straight tail.
    Unfortunately for the bigger dog he is number 3 in the hierarchy as he lost one of his eyes in a fight with the other 2 (long story). He actually looks a bit more like a German Shepard.
    Of the other 2 they are always growling at each other, one (the one in the picture) wants to be top dog and the other says piss off and leave me alone, he is the most laid back of the 3 but won't be bossed.

    Same as you I am fascinated by the dynamics as I have never had a "pack" of dogs before.
    I never knew until a few years ago that dogs actually groom each other, I always wondered how they got to the ticks/fleas etc. on their head or neck where they can't reach for themselves.

  5. #105
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    I went to collect the eggs yesterday and this (the bottom egg)was among them.
    I think one of my hens is taking the piss out of me. She should realise she is not a fukkin pigeon!

    My Splendid Cock-20210413_191124-jpg


    And just for Mendip as he mentioned there was a "bit" of rain here a week and a half ago and it turned the back of my house into a pond.
    Unfortunately unlike Mendip's pond there were no fish at all in it.
    Maybe I should be raising ducks at least the eggs should be bigger.

    My Splendid Cock-20210404_151735-jpg

  6. #106
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    Thing is Ootai, as an Engineer you should know to always add a scale to your pictures. If that top egg is from an ostrich then your hen ain't doing bad.

    I've seen really small eggs from new hens when they just start laying, maybe the size of a a sparrow's egg. Some have two shells, the inside one really small.

    There's a lot of rain about. Soon after I arrived home this afternoon we had a huge storm pass through... amongst the strongest wind I've ever seen in Thailand.



    We lost around 80 mangoes just from the front alone.


  7. #107
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    We've had several broody hens for some time now... I thought that eventually they would give up but after weeks and weeks of waiting, I relented yesterday and decided to give them the chance of motherhood.

    It was also a good excuse to get the daughter off her damn tablet... she helped me prepare the nests.

    A little '6' was written on each egg (for the 6th June) and the eggs should start hatching on the 24th, in 18 days time.

    Four mums-to-be will squeeze into this hutch.



    And a couple more here.



    This will also be a good test to see whether our new cockerel Austin is doing his job.

    I usually lock the broody hens into the hutches for the first couple of days to get them to take to the nests, then after that I let them out for a couple of hours a day. The problem with leaving the hutches permanently open is that the red egg-layers will push the broody hens off their nests in order to lay eggs. Of course, once all the nests were prepared the broody hens all decided to stay out in the run and not sit on the eggs. It may take a couple of days for them to settle.


    Lat night's rain flooded the chicken poo compost bin...



    Which meant all the maggots came to the top to escape the water. I scooped a load out for an unexpected treat for the chickens. I offered the wife a cupful but she just gave me one of those looks. I will never understand Thais as long as I live.



    This brought back some long ago memories when, as a teenager, I used to experiment with breeding maggots for coarse fishing in the UK. Different rotting meats (usually from roadkill) kept in different conditions in plastic buckets in the garage would result in different flies laying eggs, which therefore resulted in different sized maggots for bait. My parents put up with a lot.

  8. #108
    CCBW JPPR2's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mendip View Post


    Lat night's rain flooded the chicken poo compost bin...



    Which meant all the maggots came to the top to escape the water. I scooped a load out for an unexpected treat for the chickens. I offered the wife a cupful but she just gave me one of those looks. I will never understand Thais as long as I live.


    OK this thread is now off my "Following" list. No wonder why you have a fly infestation. While I know why Maggots are an essential part of the eco system seeing that many in a bucket in shit that is near a house is well....(Verp)

  9. #109
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    ^ You can't have a compost heap without maggots... this is well away from the house, no problem.

  10. #110
    Thailand Expat lom's Avatar
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    ^ He's a cityboy Mendip

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    CCBW JPPR2's Avatar
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    Yeah. I know Mendy having grown up on a farm as well. My dad used to make my brother and I dig a hole way away from the house and then wheelbarrow the shit over and when full cover it with dirt then dig another hole. We never kept chicken, pheasant and turkey shit, only a small qty of cowshit for the garden.

  12. #112
    CCBW JPPR2's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by lom View Post
    ^ He's a cityboy Mendip
    Actually Lom you are 100% wrong. But that's OK. We just never kept a shit pile exposed for the very reasons of flies and maggots.

  13. #113
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    ^ The bin is covered by a lid... which only comes off at cleaning out time. I've found this the best way to deal with the chicken shit, which is of course unavoidable of you keep chickens.

    There is very little smell in the normal way and it all breaks down nicely... it was just a bit unfortunate it flooded last night.

  14. #114
    fully fledged Mutt-packer TheRealKW's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mendip View Post
    Different rotting meats (usually from roadkill) kept in different conditions in plastic buckets in the garage would result in different flies laying eggs, which therefore resulted in different sized maggots for bait. My parents put up with a lot.


  15. #115
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mendip View Post
    ^ The bin is covered by a lid... which only comes off at cleaning out time. I've found this the best way to deal with the chicken shit, which is of course unavoidable of you keep chickens.

    There is very little smell in the normal way and it all breaks down nicely... it was just a bit unfortunate it flooded last night.
    I had 30 or so Turkey's in a huge coop and they eat and shit a lot. I had to drag and shovel it every 3 or 4 days. These were the wild North American Turkey. I was raising them to sell chicks to the department of fish and game to release into the wild and to some other breeders. You know young ambitions of trying to make extra money being we had a lot of land and I wanted a nice car. Like all farm animals they eat and they crap. I remember my younger brother wanted 2 or 3 horses. I took him to a big ranch so he could see what it was like to buck a hay bale around then pick up their shit all the time. Horses never happened and Thank God and we only had 2 cows for about 3 years.

    I also raised exotic Pheasants(Lady Amherst, Golden and Ringneck) and numerous species of ducks (Mostly Wood ducks and Mallards). The Pheasants were pets but the ducks were eaten and their feathers were sold to make flies for fly fishing. I think I still have a bunch here that I tied but will never use as there are no Trout or Steelhead in these rivers...

  16. #116
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    ^ It's a small world...

    I used to be a season ticket holder on Blagdon Lake... offering amongst the best fly fishing in the world.

    I was a member of a local village fly-tier's club and once won the annual fly tying competition with a Silver Invicta... and the competition was judged by no less than Taff Price. I still have my prize... a signed copy of his fly tying book.

    This is probably one of my biggest claims to fame.

  17. #117
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    It took a couple of days for them to settle and four broody hens are now sitting on four nests in shared accommodation.



    Blackie 12 has got the penthouse suite all to herself since Whitie 9 refused to settle.




  18. #118
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mendip View Post
    ^ It's a small world...

    I used to be a season ticket holder on Blagdon Lake... offering amongst the best fly fishing in the world.

    I was a member of a local village fly-tier's club and once won the annual fly tying competition with a Silver Invicta... and the competition was judged by no less than Taff Price. I still have my prize... a signed copy of his fly tying book.

    This is probably one of my biggest claims to fame.
    I've never fly-fished, but I did a lot of coarse fishing as a kid - in matches too - and I got back into it last summer when I was staying at home. Maybe I can stick some pictures up, but the maggots that my mum (still) made me keep outside landed me roach, perch, rudd, skimmer and bream in abundance and even a couple of little jack pike.

    No claims to fame, but I empathise with your maggot struggles as a kid!
    9

  19. #119
    CCBW JPPR2's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mendip View Post
    It's a small world...
    Funny Mendy, it is. I was really interested in learning fly tying. Went to a couple of work shops. I brought all my fly fishing gear here but left my fly tying holder, eyepiece and spools with my friend in the states. I made a lot of contacts in the workshops for selling my feathers. Was quite a nice little business. Most wanted the Wood duck and Golden Pheasant feathers. I miss fly fishing. So many beautiful rivers in the Pacific Northwest to fish.



    Wood duck



    Golden Pheasant

  20. #120
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    ^^ I used to be an avid coarse fisher on the Somerset levels and caught the same fish you listed. I also did some match fishing way back when.

    When I started fly fishing the coarse fishing fell by the wayside... I just found it more exciting and liked that you are more mobile.

    My parents were fairly strict, but my mum allowed me to keep the maggot bait boxes in the bottom of the fridge... the cold slows down their development into casters and then flies, so they last longer.

    The maggots go inert and lifeless in the cold, but pop a few in your mouth to warm them up and they soon start wriggling before you stick them on the hook.

  21. #121
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    Quote Originally Posted by JPPR2 View Post
    Funny Mendy, it is. I was really interested in learning fly tying. Went to a couple of work shops. I brought all my fly fishing gear here but left my fly tying holder, eyepiece and spools with my friend in the states. I made a lot of contacts in the workshops for selling my feathers. Was quite a nice little business. Most wanted the Wood duck and Golden Pheasant feathers. I miss fly fishing. So many beautiful rivers in the Pacific Northwest to fish.
    Sounds very familiar... my fly tying stuff will still be in my mum's loft. There's a golden pheasant cape there, along with a myriad of other bits and pieces from birds and mammals.

    Any dead rabbits or hares I found on the road would be taken home and skinned for the fur to make flies. I remember once my long suffering mum took me to an abattoir to collect a few calf's tails. These were dyed bright colours to make lures for trout.

    The kids don't seem to do this kind of stuff any more.

  22. #122
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mendip View Post
    The maggots go inert and lifeless in the cold, but pop a few in your mouth to warm them up
    Too much information.

  23. #123
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mendip View Post

    The maggots go inert and lifeless in the cold, but pop a few in your mouth to warm them up and they soon start wriggling before you stick them on the hook.

    This plus the fact that you actually eat "black pudding" confuses me as to why you won't eat the delicacies that are eaten here in Isaan i.e. bbq rat, ants eggs, frogs etc.

  24. #124
    fully fledged Mutt-packer TheRealKW's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mendip View Post
    The maggots go inert and lifeless in the cold, but pop a few in your mouth to warm them up and they soon start wriggling before you stick them on the hook.
    Really?



  25. #125
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    Yet he baulks at raisins.

    The guy is more full of shit than that bucket up there

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