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  1. #726
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    oh they do have that baby stage.. lol..
    But they're like 2mm thick and about 25mm long.. sitting under the leaves, so you easily overlook them.
    If you don't mind, just squeezing them would perfectly do the job to protect the plant.
    Easiest is to look for a group of brown spots under the leaves.. Those are the eggs.
    And spraying those eggs, the soap and molasses should kill them off.

  2. #727
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    Found one of these today. There sure are some strange creatures in the soil.What's in your garden?-dscf0866-jpg

  3. #728
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    It's a hammerhead worm Tunk. I've seen them in our garden as well. They prey on earthworms and should be killed if you value your soil quality... apparently it's best to dissolve them in salt as if you just squash them or cut them up a load of eggs can be released. In my case they go over the wall into the arsehole neighbour's garden.

    Oh... and you shouldn't eat them as they release mild toxins when hunting prey.

  4. #729
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    ^^Alienesque little creature. I dug up a blind snake a few years ago and kept it as a pet for a few weeks before releasing it.

    Not growing in my garden yet but the Minx brought round red kiwi tonight.

    What's in your garden?-img_20210721_200612crop-jpg


    I have just planted avocados and I would like to try kiwi although I think QLD might be too warm for them.

    The red ones have a strange creamy taste compared with the green ones.

    Eating some healthy fruit earns you the right to indulge in a Chinese egg custard bun.

    What's in your garden?-img_20210721_201344-jpg


    Strange confections with a distinct taste of egg yolk.

  5. #730
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    Has she Welsh blood?

    There seems to be more than the usual number of digits there!
    Last edited by Mendip; 21-07-2021 at 09:40 PM.

  6. #731
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    ^She is from the other great dragon kingdom...

    That is her supernatural ghostly shapeshifting photomorphosis property manifesting itself again I think!

  7. #732
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mendip View Post
    It's a hammerhead worm Tunk. I've seen them in our garden as well. They prey on earthworms and should be killed if you value your soil quality... apparently it's best to dissolve them in salt as if you just squash them or cut them up a load of eggs can be released. In my case they go over the wall into the arsehole neighbour's garden.

    Oh... and you shouldn't eat them as they release mild toxins when hunting prey.
    The toxin is not so mild, the same thing you find in puffer fish and the blue-ringed octopus. It is just that it has very little of it.

    I can't quite make my mind up about these hammerheads. They do eat worms, true, and slugs too. Birds eat worms but I don't mind that, so why is the hammerhead different? I think it is because they are an objectionable life form, covering their prey in toxic slime and absorbing it as a sludge. When they are full their mouth becomes their anus. Charming. They can reproduce sexually and asexually.

    A reason not to squash them is that they can regenerate from small pieces. In theory they could live for ever. Spooky.

    So I walked out of my front door this morning and what is wriggling across the tile?

    What's in your garden?-hammerhead-jpg

    Also this morning there was a mantis on the veranda.

    What's in your garden?-mantis-jpg

    What's in your garden?-mantis2-jpg

    It was longer and thinner than ones I have seen here before. There are a lot of different types of mantis in Thailand. I think this one was probably the Chinese mantis (Tenodera sinensis).

  8. #733
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mendip View Post
    In my case they go over the wall into the arsehole neighbour's garden.
    Then under the wall and back into your garden?

  9. #734
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    ''What's in your garden?''


    What’s in my garden? A lot of Heliconias, that’s what.

    In an earlier post, somewhere on TD, I referred to creating a ‘jungle garden’.

    That’s not quite right – Tropical garden would have been the right description. Not being the worlds best gardener, and so not really knowing what I was doing, I started buying the big stuff - palms of varying sizes, ornamentals plus coconuts, and dates and bananas.

    Then, I needed to start 'filling in'.




    H Lady Di .................................................. .................................................H. Psittacorum

    With the project started, I began searching for plants to go in that garden. Grasses, leafy foliage and of course, some Heliconias.




    Heliconia Psittacorum, in both orange and red outer bract covers (actually, I think the red version has another name too, but I cannot find it!)

  10. #735
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    Once I started looking, I realised there was a huge assortment of colours, sizes and type, and that’s before even looking at the hybrid variants.



    The colours work quite well when placed with other plants, here the dwarf Heliconia in orange is perfectly at home with the purple of the Morning glory behind


    Then there are the fancier ones –



    ................................................H. Bihai, sometimes known as ‘Balisier’

    This Heliconia Bihai took forever to start flowering, but now there are 5 bracts forming. They are ALL growing runners to propagate and expand.




    .............................................H.Rostrata, or ‘hanging lobster claw’


    I collected this Heliconia Rostrata from a neighbour (yes…they did know!) because I haven’t seen it in any garden shop so far. It was in bloom, as you can see, when it was planted but died back soon after. However, new shoots / leaves are now coming so I have this to look forward to again, later this year





    H. Marginata ‘Rauliniana’

    This was another swap with a neighbour – they got 2 clumps of the H.Psitticorium! This version is a cultivar, a hybrid between the Rostrata and the true Marginata.



    ............................................

  11. #736
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    I have 2 other new arrivals but no photos yet as they do not carry flowers. The Heliconia Family was new to me but I have embraced it as a mainstay of the tropical garden I am creating. I hope to get a few more varieties with predominantly yellow or green, to balance up the appearance and for variety. Here’s a few more photos…








    They stand out even when surrounded by foliage.

    PS…progress is being made but the TD Towers garden still had a VERY long way to go!!

    Thanks for looking.

  12. #737
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    How they manage to grow out from the bricks? And how did they get into the bricks?

    What's in your garden?-img_2277-jpg

  13. #738
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    Hi Klondyke,

    Heliconias DO spread. Its a rhizome-based plant so, of course those rhizomes' grow! They spread in one of two ways - the clump expands, i.e. its still a tight 'mass' or... the clump puts out a runner and expands that way. Both need to be managed - those expansions, particularly the runners will easily pass under any border or wall.

    To control them, I simply cut them off with the spade and replant / repot them for swaps or gifts. The Heliconia Psittacorum is a rampant spreader, whereas those fancier ones are relatively slow.

    In any case, the tropical garden is not super-formal - I put the paths in just for ease of travelling about but several of the ground cover plants are already encroaching and need to be cut back periodically. If one of the Heliconias decides to put a shoot up in the path, I will deal with it later, and just enjoy the bract when it comes.

    I will try to do a proper garden 'update' as it has been requested by a few members and 7 months has gone by since she and I turned our attention to the garden

    OMG is it really 7 months!?

  14. #739
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    Quote Originally Posted by Thai Dhupp View Post
    Both need to be managed - those expansions, particularly the runners will easily pass under any border or wall.

    To control them, I simply cut them off with the spade and replant / repot them for swaps or gifts. The Heliconia Psittacorum is a rampant spreader, whereas those fancier ones are relatively slow.
    Thanks for the scientific knowledge.
    Actually, I do not mind their spread, it's a wall of the outdoor shower box at swimming pool. It beautifies somehow an ugly wall...

  15. #740
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  16. #741
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    Rhabdophis subminiatus (Red-Necked Keelback Snake)

    Thai: (ngoo lay sab ko dang)
    Length: Up to 100 cm (1 meters). I’ve never seen one close to 1 meter in length.
    Range: Thailand and southeast Asia.
    Notes: These snakes are commonly found near water, lakes, ponds, and in gardens. Recently a friend had one in his swimming pool in Krabi town, southern Thailand.
    Active Time? Daylight hours. I’ve found them sleeping around 1 foot off the ground in bushes.
    Food: Frogs, poisonous toads, and fish. I have not seen them eat anything but frogs and toads.
    Defensive Behavior: Spread out the neck slightly to make themselves appear bigger. Not as dramatic as a cobra. Lift their head and neck off the ground 4-5 inches.
    Some snakes of this species, and others in the genus Rhabdophis, have displayed a rather unique defensive behavior of exposing the back of their neck and secreting poison from their nuchal glands. This is not all that common unless very provoked.
    One researcher, Kevin Messenger, claims that the R. subminiatus helleri he caught in Hong Kong actually sprayed a mist of the poison into the air from the back of the neck. Quite amazing, if true, right? Obviously more study is needed into the secret life of this fascinating snake. Other snakes in Rhabdophis genus with nuchal glands: R. nuchalis, R. tigrinus, R. nigrocinctus, and R. chrysargos (in Thailand).
    Here is an image of the snake expressing poison from the nuchal glands.
    The liquid on the neck near the top of the red shade is poison acquired at least in part, from eating poisonous Bufo toads.Here is the description in a scientific journal about Kevin’s encounter.
    Venom Toxicity: LD50 is 1.29 mg/kg for intravenous injection (source). That is about the same rating as the very deadly “Banded Krait (Bungarus fasciatus)”. It was previously thought these snakes were harmless. Some kept them as pets and were bitten. In one case the snake was left to bite for two entire minutes before removing it from a finger.
    Serious complications resulted requiring hospitalization and intensive care. Click for article. These snakes are rear-fanged and need to bite and hold on, or, repeatedly bite to have any effect on humans. Once they do either – there is the possibility of severe problems including renal failure and death. Recently a small boy of 12 years old was bitten by one he was keeping as a pet in Phuket, Thailand and he is currently being treated (11/5/10). Be very careful not be be bitten by these snakes. There is NO ANTIVENIN available yet for these snakes in Thailand. Scroll down for information about antivenin manufactured in Japan that may have some positive effect.
    Another study in Japan ranked the venom as having an LD50 of 1.25 mg/kg for intravenous injection. (Japan Snake Institute, Hon-machi, Yabuzuka, Nitta-gun, Gunma-ken, Japan) V.1- 1969- Volume(issue)
    In Japan they make limited amounts of antivenin, but it is specifically for their in-country use.
    One WHO (World Health Organization) publication about the management of venomous snake bites in Southeast Asia mentions the antivenin for Rhabdophis tigrinus in Japan as having some effect on the venom of R. subminiatus. I am not sure if this is strictly for R. subminiatus found in Japan, or not. Worth a try though if you can get them to send you some antivenin. Otherwise, there is no other option – there is no monovalent antivenin specifically for R. subminiatus.
    Japan Snake Institute
    Nihon Hebizoku Gakujutsu Kenkyujo
    3318 Yunoiri Yabuzuka
    Yabuzukahonmachi Nittagun Gunmaken 379-2301
    Tel 0277 785193 Fax 0277 785520
    Snake-c@sunfield.ne.jp
    www.sunfield.ne.jp/~snake-c/
    Yamakagashi (Rhabdophis tigrinus) antivenom. Also effective against rednecked keelback (R. subminiatus venom)
    Update: The 12 year old boy bitten by the Rhabdophis subminiatus was treated for 2 weeks of intensive care, and released. He was bitten multiple times, the 2nd bite lasting over 20 seconds.
    Offspring: I had a juvenile red-necked keelback I’ve taken photos and videos of and released into the wild. I cannot find anything much about offspring. Recently (mid-June) I found a DOR juvenile very recently hatched, so like most snakes in Thailand the time around June is when they are hatching out. The coloration of the juvenile is quite different from adults as you can see in the photo and video below.
    A hint of red on the neck in the juvenile. A pronounced black banding at the neck and grey on the head is evident in juveniles.Notes: These snakes can inflict a deadly bite when they are allowed to bite for longer than a couple of seconds. I know personally of two instances where a child was bitten for well over 20 seconds, and a man was bitten for about a minute. Neither wanted to hurt the snake to remove it forcibly, and both spent over a week in intensive care, with the possibility of renal failure and death. Do not play with these snakes. If you have one, do not free-handle it. Treat it like you would a pit viper or a cobra. The LD50 on this snake for intravenous was stated to be 1.29 mg/kg. That is VERY venomous.
    As a precaution, any snake in the Rhabdophis genus should be treated with extreme caution. In Thailand we also have the diurnal Rhabdophis nigrocinctus, and Rhabdophis chrysargos, both of which may be able to inflict a medically significant bite if given the opportunity.
    Red-necked Keelback Scientific Classification

    Kingdom: Animalia
    Phylum: Chordata
    Class: Reptilia
    Order: Squamata
    Suborder: Serpentes
    Family: Colubridae
    Genus: Rhabdophis
    Species: Rhabdophis subminiatus
    Lang may yer lum reek...

  17. #742
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    ^ We've had several red-necked keelbacks in the garden, but not for a while. My original snake book listed them as harmless but a recent re-print of the same book I have now lists them as dangerous. I believe this is due to some unfortunate recent incidents.

    They are rear-fanged, which means they'd have to really chew on you for a while to inject any venom so I can't see them being a big problem to an adult, so long as you pull one off if it bites you.

  18. #743
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    Still, I'd be shooting the bastard. Family first.

  19. #744
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    Any birders out there who can help? No photo I am afraid.

    This morning there was a bird I have never seen before hunting in the mango tree outside my window.

    It was small, about the size of a Blue tit and like a tit it was able to hang upside down. The beak was relatively long, slim and straight. The back was a light olive colour.

    The most distinctive feature by far was a bright yellow chest with a broad black stripe that started about the middle of the breast and ran down between the legs.

    I'd have thought something so distinctive would be easy to find but I have looked at hundreds of images and not found it yet.

  20. #745
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    What's in your garden?-_75446788_carbonera1_copia-jpg
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails What's in your garden?-_75446788_carbonera1_copia-jpg  

  21. #746
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    Quote Originally Posted by dirk diggler View Post
    Similar DD. Unlike the tits I know the black stripe did not get all the way up to the neck and the yellow was very striking.

  22. #747
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    These are Great Tits :P

  23. #748
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shutree View Post
    This morning there was a bird I have never seen before hunting in the mango tree outside my window.

    It was small, about the size of a Blue tit and like a tit it was able to hang upside down. The beak was relatively long, slim and straight. The back was a light olive colour.

    The most distinctive feature by far was a bright yellow chest with a broad black stripe that started about the middle of the breast and ran down between the legs.
    My first thought was a sunbird, maybe an olive backed sunbird. They can hang upside down, they have light olive coloured backs and have relatively long slim beaks, but the beaks are not straight, they are slightly curved. They also do not have a broad black stripe from the middle of the breast to down between the legs. They don't usually have black stripes at all but an "eclipse male" bird sometimes has a thin black stripe on its neck and upper breast. Here's an image from wiki.



    If it's not that, I don't know what it is. I'd love to see a photo of it if you can get one next time it visits you.
    • Respecting someone’s provided pronouns is not optional so please use these respectfully or use their name.
    • Don’t make it a big deal if you make a mistake. Correct yourself, apologise genuinely and move on.

    UQ

  24. #749
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    Quote Originally Posted by dirk diggler View Post
    These are Great Tits :P
    Any excuse to post a great pair of tits:

    What's in your garden?-great_tit_1200x1200-jpg

  25. #750
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    Here's an example with a longer black streak.



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