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  1. #276
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    Quote Originally Posted by David48atTD View Post
    "Pig manure in sacks put in each corner when the rain comes. This will allow plankton to grow" ... so do you rely on the plankton to feed the fish?

    If so, any supplementary feeding?

    Thanks
    Yes we feed them as well, they used to overfeed, which can be bad if there isn't enough oxygen in the water. I want to put a solar powered aerator in the pond and also a pump or fountain, to allow more fish. Wife doesn't want to commit to the expense. The pond can sustain plenty of fish for us as it is.

  2. #277
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    Ootai, I think you can do make a go of it if you or family members can monitor it full time or make it difficult for someone to roll up with a pickup and stun the lot and clear them out but ifts pretty disheartening when you spend 6 months caring for them and they vanish in one night - think both times it was c100K and at that value its too tempting - wish i'd caught the fukers tho, i'd have properly taken it out on then and i can be a nasty fuker (well in my younger days ), not the money but the effort my Mrs put in and how upset she was.

    If you have room on the property you live on full time and its not at commercial levels i.e a smallish pond for you to take fish for your own consumption then i think its a goer and with hindsight i'd have liked enough room and the requisite water table to support a 10 x 10 m pond, would be enough me thinks.

  3. #278
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    Quote Originally Posted by NamPikToot View Post
    Ootai, I think you can do make a go of it if you or family members can monitor it full time or make it difficult for someone to roll up with a pickup and stun the lot and clear them out but ifts pretty disheartening when you spend 6 months caring for them and they vanish in one night - think both times it was c100K and at that value its too tempting - wish i'd caught the fukers tho, i'd have properly taken it out on then and i can be a nasty fuker (well in my younger days ), not the money but the effort my Mrs put in and how upset she was.

    If you have room on the property you live on full time and its not at commercial levels i.e a smallish pond for you to take fish for your own consumption then i think its a goer and with hindsight i'd have liked enough room and the requisite water table to support a 10 x 10 m pond, would be enough me thinks.

    Alternatively, quite often one will find that larger fish-bearing ponds can act as a community binder where sharing is a given -
    Examples are numerous throughout the hinterlands.

  4. #279
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    Quote Originally Posted by HuangLao View Post
    Alternatively, quite often one will find that larger fish-bearing ponds can act as a community binder where sharing is a given -
    Examples are numerous throughout the hinterlands.
    Yep there's one called Lam Takong down the road from us - i'm going to get one of the small blue plastic boats, a small outboard, ice box which i will empty whist fishing and do my own community fishing

  5. #280
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    Quote Originally Posted by NamPikToot View Post
    Yep there's one called Lam Takong down the road from us - i'm going to get one of the small blue plastic boats, a small outboard, ice box which i will empty whist fishing and do my own community fishing
    So you're near Pak Chong, NPT?

  6. #281
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    Quote Originally Posted by Neverna View Post
    So you're near Pak Chong, NPT?
    That's an affirmative, up in the hills but not on the big dry plain -but as far those living in sin city are concerned, bumfuknowhere - but i like it. My Mrs still has a place or two in BKK but i always find about 5 days is enough. Mrs was born and bred in BKK but she hates now, too many peeps, dirty, too loud and stinks

    EDIT she was born in BKK, lived the first 6 ears in Chant then back to BKK, she remembers swimming in the klongs when they were clean - i said yeah fukin bolloix but she won't have it, i said with that water where'd ya think you got the six fingers and toes - she's great opening jars by the way.....
    Last edited by NamPikToot; 26-01-2019 at 10:58 PM.

  7. #282
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    Quote Originally Posted by JPPR2 View Post
    ootai,
    Nice job on the hedges, a slight trim and some water changes everything. I even noticed the grass was greener and almost needs a mow.

    How does the chipper work?

    I looked at some but was leary. Can you toss in Banana leaves? I saw one that you can even toss in full coconuts and they fly out as basically as dust....


    JPPR
    I don't think you could toss coconuts into this one the throat of the hopper is too small. I was using it today and meant to chop off some banana leaves and put them through but I forgot so next time. I did take some more pictures so here we go.

    We have a few of these trees around the place I think they are called "Tagoo trees" but I could be mistaken. They make beautiful shade trees but the branches are not really well connected and they break off, especially since we cut a lot of ours back and the regrowth is not stable once they get longer. Anyway today I cut a few small limbs off and put them through the mulcher along with a whole pile of leaves I raked up.
    What's in your garden?-1-jpg

    Here are the branches for chipping / mulching. The guy where I bought it told me to limit the size to no more than 2 inch diameter
    What's in your garden?-2-jpg

    Only leaves in the net so far.
    What's in your garden?-3-jpg

    Now there are some wood chips piling up.
    What's in your garden?-4-jpg

    Looking good, to me anyway.
    What's in your garden?-6-jpg

    A close up of the chips.
    What's in your garden?-7-jpg

    This was the largest bit I put through, the opening is 70mm x 70mm so this branch was probably 2.5inch diameter. Make it or break it?
    The wood from these trees is quite soft though.
    What's in your garden?-9-jpg
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails What's in your garden?-1-jpg   What's in your garden?-2-jpg   What's in your garden?-3-jpg   What's in your garden?-4-jpg   What's in your garden?-6-jpg  

    What's in your garden?-7-jpg   What's in your garden?-9-jpg  

  8. #283
    CCBW JPPR2's Avatar
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    That looks good Ootai. I am really considering a chipper. That pile looks great and spread out around tree wells will really help fertile them.

  9. #284
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    Quote Originally Posted by JPPR2 View Post
    That looks good Ootai. I am really considering a chipper. That pile looks great and spread out around tree wells will really help fertile them.

    JPPR2
    I won't be using it around the trees just yet i am still trying to fill my 2 compost bins I made. Once they are full and merrily rotting away i will start using it mulch around trees etc.

    I will also try putting some banana leaves through it for you to see how it handles them. I think at this point they might need to go through the hole where the branches go so they get chopped up better. Because the part where the leaves and sort goes through just spits it out sometimes without smashing it up because the feed is at 90 degrees to the axis of rotation.

    The branches actually get cut by a blade while the others just get flailed by spinning bars.

    Here's some pictures cause I know you like the mechanical stuff.

    Mine is a Tru Yard CM 65 series powered by a 6.4HP Honda motor, I paid 26,500 for it.
    There is a 9.5hp model and another that runs via the PTO of a tractor of course they are more expensive.
    What's in your garden?-11-jpg

    What's in your garden?-12-jpg


    Looking into the top of the funnel where leaves and stuff goes you can see there are 3 arms each with 6 flails on that rotate and smash the stuff fed in from above.
    What's in your garden?-13-jpg

    This view shows the cutting blade that cuts the branches that are fed in on the side. I think it would have been better with 2 of these instead of just one.
    What's in your garden?-14-jpg

    Finally here are the cards from the 2 guys at the store where I bought it in Buriram. They are both Americans so you could probably communicate with them although they don't really speak English. They told me if it is in Thailand they will get it for you and I assume for a price ship it to you as well.
    What's in your garden?-15-jpg
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails What's in your garden?-11-jpg   What's in your garden?-12-jpg   What's in your garden?-13-jpg   What's in your garden?-14-jpg   What's in your garden?-15-jpg  


  10. #285
    CCBW JPPR2's Avatar
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    Cool stuff ootai. Thanks for sharing. It looks sturdy and does a good job from what it appears.

  11. #286
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    Well its been a while and a lot has happened so I thought I might provide an update on the garden.

    Early in February my knee stuffed up and as a result I could hardly walk let alone work in the garden so it went wild and the weeds took over.
    In April I went down to Australia to see my grandkids, don't really know why as I could not get around as much as I would have liked.

    Anyway once I got back here I went to see the Doctor and then the Orthopaedic Surgeon recommended by Pragmatic (thanks Prag) and in early October I had a total knee replacement done on my left knee. Luckily I had a very successful recovery and was my knee was almost fully recovered after 3 weeks so it was time to attack the weeds.

    So there was no way I was going to dig by hand the 1000sqm of garden I have so I went and bought a new toy.

    What's in your garden?-20200106_172958-jpg
    Its a tilling machine and cost me 17,500

    What's in your garden?-20200106_173009-jpg
    It does a bloody great job and is not hard to operate.

    So here is what the garden looks like now.
    What's in your garden?-20200104_073719-jpg
    Taken from the North eastern corner under the shade cloth looking South.

    What's in your garden?-20200104_073723-jpg
    from the same spot but looking East

    What's in your garden?-20200104_073754-jpg
    A closer look at the cabbages I think they are but might be a lettuce not exactly sure

    What's in your garden?-20200104_073810-jpg
    Taken in the middle of the east side looking south west

    What's in your garden?-20200104_073820-jpg
    This is my pride and joy (if you look hard) I planted some asparagus seeds and some actually grew. They are in between the rows of coriander

    What's in your garden?-20200104_073849-jpg
    This is further along the east side looking west and shows pak bong(front left), tomatoes and cucumbers (on the trellace)

    What's in your garden?-20200104_073853-jpg
    Some of the many pumpkins planted. This time I have installed drip irrigation to make watering easy and hopefully efficient

    What's in your garden?-20200104_073927-jpg
    Cucumbers on the right and on the left Zucchini in the front and long beans at the back

    What's in your garden?-20200104_073929-jpg
    On the east side looking North west


    What's in your garden?-20200104_074043-jpg
    Taken from North eastern corner looking west

    What's in your garden?-20200104_074250-jpg
    No longer under shade cloth, in the front 2 rows are chillies which were bought as plants and transplanted to here. Behind that is 2 more rows of chillies but planted as seeds.

    What's in your garden?-20200104_074340-jpg
    On the west side of the shade house I have planted some corn which are also drip fed water. There are more rows of corn to be planted once these get bigger. the idea being a supply over a longer period rather than a glut then nothing.

    What's in your garden?-20200104_074411-jpg
    This is an area south west of the shade house and I have just planted butternut pumpkin (hopefully it will grow), some watermelon, rockmelon and some honeydew melon's
    There are some more rows to the right of this picture which will be more chillies. The seedling are growing right now and will be transplanted in a week or so.

    What's in your garden?-20200104_074611-jpg
    More pumpkins

    What's in your garden?-20200104_074619-jpg
    and more pumpkins with cucumbers (buab)along the fence.


    I am reasonably happy with how its going at the moment but I still need to work on improving the soil and because it hasn't rained in months the weeds are not to bad.

    Cheers
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails What's in your garden?-20200106_172958-jpg   What's in your garden?-20200106_173009-jpg   What's in your garden?-20200104_073719-jpg   What's in your garden?-20200104_073723-jpg   What's in your garden?-20200104_073754-jpg  

    What's in your garden?-20200104_073810-jpg   What's in your garden?-20200104_073820-jpg   What's in your garden?-20200104_073849-jpg   What's in your garden?-20200104_073853-jpg   What's in your garden?-20200104_073927-jpg  

    What's in your garden?-20200104_073929-jpg   What's in your garden?-20200104_074040-jpg   What's in your garden?-20200104_074043-jpg   What's in your garden?-20200104_074250-jpg   What's in your garden?-20200104_074340-jpg  

    What's in your garden?-20200104_074411-jpg   What's in your garden?-20200104_074611-jpg   What's in your garden?-20200104_074619-jpg  
    Last edited by ootai; 06-01-2020 at 06:57 PM. Reason: spelling correction

  12. #287
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    Ootai, that's a great looking plot. Its my intention to have similar one day, your soil is much nicer looking however so work will be required to improve ours. Have to ask, do you spray, because of not how the hell do you stop all your greens getting munched by everything.

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    ความรู้ลึกลับ HuangLao's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by NamPikToot View Post
    Ootai, that's a great looking plot. Its my intention to have similar one day, your soil is much nicer looking however so work will be required to improve ours. Have to ask, do you spray, because of not how the hell do you stop all your greens getting munched by everything.
    Bit of a misnomer that most leafy greens are susceptible to critter invasions - you'll find that this is the case pertaining to a greater percentage of varieties.
    Know and again, but nothing terribly destructive.

    You'll find this to be true once you get into experiment and variety of what to grow.
    Nature provides/protects - needn't be applying chemical pesticides.

  14. #289
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    Quote Originally Posted by HuangLao View Post
    You'll find this to be true once you get into experiment and variety of what to grow. .
    Erm Jeff i am speaking from experience, setting aside the squashes, ours get lunched.

  15. #290
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    NPT
    Yes I am living in Thailand so i do what the Thai's would do, mainly goverened by my MIL as she is the one I am learning from so yes I do use spray. Not a lot and so far there have only been 2 "bugs" I have had to deal with. One is an orange beetle that likes to eat the young cucumber and pumpkin leaves. The other is a little black mite that attacks the beans.

    When I retired in Feb 2017 it was my goal to make myself a garden to keep myself busy. Golfing would have been better but is more expensive and takes a 90km drive to get to the closest decent golf course in Korat. Also one of the first memories I have of my MIL was way back in 2000 and it was of her scratching around in some shitty gravelly soil trying to grow a few plants. She is 75+ and loves her garden/s and I thought it was something I could do for her (and myself). I should point out she does a lot of work in 'my" garden. She transplants the seedlings, looks after the plants and gets into digging and pulling out the weeds.

    As for the soil it has taken me 3 years to get it to the point where it is almost good enough to grow whatever I want. Lots of straw dug in along with copious amounts of cow shit, some chicken shit and my own style compost. The problem initially was the original soil was too clayey and wouldn't let the water soak in. Plant roots can't grow as they have no room in the fine clay to put down roots.

    Some of the mistakes I have made so far are, too much shade cloth in that I enclosed the whole lot i.e. roof and walls. Now I just have it over the roof and the sides basically open this lets the wind blow through and lets the insects in to do their job of pollinating. Another mistake was the amount of water I used to pour on, now I water a lot less and have added the drip irrigation, the MIL also does a lot of the watering as she gets out very early in the morning and enjoys spending the time in the garden. I sometimes think she talks to the plants (555).

    For those that may be wondering if it is a commercial garden it is not. Having said that the MIL sometimes sells some of the crop around the village. She gets her great grand daughter (who lives with me and my wife) to go around on the motorbike and sell it door to door.

    Sorry for the long reply, I must be feeling lonely?

  16. #291
    ความรู้ลึกลับ HuangLao's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by NamPikToot View Post
    Erm Jeff i am speaking from experience, setting aside the squashes, ours get lunched.
    Yes.
    Experience.
    Of course.


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    great looking vegie garden there mate. Any ornamentals as well, or do you go by the Thai philosophy ...if you cannot eat it, why grow it ?

  18. #293
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    Quote Originally Posted by mikenot View Post
    great looking vegie garden there mate. Any ornamentals as well, or do you go by the Thai philosophy ...if you cannot eat it, why grow it ?

    mikenot
    I thought the Thai philosophy was "if it grows eat it".
    Anyway there are no ornamentals is the garden at the back of the house only edibles.
    There are some at the front but they are all almost dead as they don't get much love, attention or water. Much earlier in this thread I spoke a bit about the watering at the front and how it is almost impossible to keep up in last year's and this year's drought. As the bore for the house is only 30+ metres deep and some bores in the village have gone dry the Missus doesn't like me running the pump all day just to water flowers and grass.
    The bore for the back garden is 60+m deep so is into a different aquifer than the house bore.
    More efficient use of water is why I have installed quite a bit of drip irrigation.

  19. #294
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    Ootai, several years ago we were also plagued by those little orange beetles. They attacked the leaves of pumpkins, water melons, cucumbers and courgettes which I subsequently learned all belonged to the same plant family... the gourd family. The larvae of these beetles also attack plant roots and nailed our crops of runner beans - the seedlings died before they reached a few inches long.

    At the time I went to a seed shop with one of these beetles in a bottle and the guy gave me this tin can of some kind of pesticide that he said would kill the beetles. He told me to wear a mask and long trousers when spraying it.

    Considering that a Thai had advised me to wear protective clothing, it must have been some pretty serious shit and I later decided not to use it. I just changed our veggie garden crop away from the gourd family.

    I've also given up trying European crops, which all seemed to succumb to one bug or another, and now only grow the local vegetables. It was a shame to stop trying the English runner beans, but the Thai long bean is a close second for me.

    This is our modest veggie garden now... surrounded by chicken wire to stop the dogs digging up the seedlings. We keep chickens and periodically I dig in rotted down chicken manure, although you have to let it rot down a long time as it's too strong when fresh. I surrounded the raised beds with used building blocks (dumped around our area) to try and stop the soil washing away in the wet season... not that we had one this year.



    The crops are mainly morning glory, pak choi, some cabbagey kind of thing (ka na?), coriander and various other herbs and stuff. I've been trying to introduce crop rotation and leaving beds fallow but this seems to be a foreign concept, at least to our gardener. We will get one great crop of long beans, then he'll plant a second batch of bean seeds immediately after, along the same bed, and the seedlings don't grow past a few inches high. I keep working on this...

    As for spraying these days... the gardener makes this purple liquid concoction from a combination of shrimp paste, some kind of Thai vitamin drink and lao khao. He reckons it works, but I think it smells so awful that the bugs just go away for a few days until the stench wears off. It's a worse smell than pla ra.



    I'm forever finding these bottles of concoctions around the garden... there's another yellow coloured one that he makes from gone-off milk. it's no problem as it's all made from natural stuff... my main concern is that after a few Ya Dong's one night I get the bottles mixed up and end up taking a swig of rotted shrimp paste, sour milk and lao khao!


  20. #295
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    Mendip
    If I didn't spray the bugs the MIL would and then I wouldn't know what the hell is being used.
    As for growing different vegies I try everything to see what happens. The MIL sticks with the tried and true Thai stuff though.
    Cherry tomatoes grow well here but up until this year I have never had success with bigger varieties, this year I have had some great tomatoes to eat. I love them on toast.

    As for raised beds the MIL doesn't understand why I do it but when it rains it does wash the place away if you haven't channelled it where you want it to go.
    I have black plastic fencing (90cm high) around the bottom and then 1.7m high fish net above that to stop the chickens getting in, seems to be working. You can see it on the right side in this picture.


    What's in your garden?-20200104_074411-jpg

    As for my poisons this is what I use. The stuff on the left is for the orange beetles and you use 2.5ml in 10 litres. The other is for the black mites and I use 1 sachel in 20litres,
    What's in your garden?-20200108_103658-jpg

    These are the black mites
    What's in your garden?-20190122_123433-jpg
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails What's in your garden?-20200104_074411-jpg   What's in your garden?-20200108_103658-jpg   What's in your garden?-20190122_123433-jpg  

  21. #296
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mendip View Post
    Ootai, several years ago we were also plagued by those little orange beetles. They attacked the leaves of pumpkins, water melons, cucumbers and courgettes which I subsequently learned all belonged to the same plant family... the gourd family. The larvae of these beetles also attack plant roots and nailed our crops of runner beans - the seedlings died before they reached a few inches long.

    At the time I went to a seed shop with one of these beetles in a bottle and the guy gave me this tin can of some kind of pesticide that he said would kill the beetles. He told me to wear a mask and long trousers when spraying it.

    Considering that a Thai had advised me to wear protective clothing, it must have been some pretty serious shit and I later decided not to use it. I just changed our veggie garden crop away from the gourd family.

    I've also given up trying European crops, which all seemed to succumb to one bug or another, and now only grow the local vegetables. It was a shame to stop trying the English runner beans, but the Thai long bean is a close second for me.

    This is our modest veggie garden now... surrounded by chicken wire to stop the dogs digging up the seedlings. We keep chickens and periodically I dig in rotted down chicken manure, although you have to let it rot down a long time as it's too strong when fresh. I surrounded the raised beds with used building blocks (dumped around our area) to try and stop the soil washing away in the wet season... not that we had one this year.



    The crops are mainly morning glory, pak choi, some cabbagey kind of thing (ka na?), coriander and various other herbs and stuff. I've been trying to introduce crop rotation and leaving beds fallow but this seems to be a foreign concept, at least to our gardener. We will get one great crop of long beans, then he'll plant a second batch of bean seeds immediately after, along the same bed, and the seedlings don't grow past a few inches high. I keep working on this...

    As for spraying these days... the gardener makes this purple liquid concoction from a combination of shrimp paste, some kind of Thai vitamin drink and lao khao. He reckons it works, but I think it smells so awful that the bugs just go away for a few days until the stench wears off. It's a worse smell than pla ra.



    I'm forever finding these bottles of concoctions around the garden... there's another yellow coloured one that he makes from gone-off milk. it's no problem as it's all made from natural stuff... my main concern is that after a few Ya Dong's one night I get the bottles mixed up and end up taking a swig of rotted shrimp paste, sour milk and lao khao!



    Seems to be a more common practice, Mendy - traditional natural concoctions to ward off the few that might incur.

    Another technique that is employed will be alternating particular flower/plant groups [that discourage most critters] interspersed among one's garden edibles.
    Rotation with a variety of things certainly will be a plus, as well.
    Applies, especially if one has extensive garden areas.

    These mechanics are old tricks and used for ages.

    Alternatives for toxic chemical additives.

  22. #297
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    Something else we've got in the garden just now... the mango trees are absolutely covered in blossom. So long as we don't get a late cold snap or windy spell to knock all he blossom off, 2020 is looking like a bumper mango year!


  23. #298
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    Snap Mendiip, our 3 bigger Mangos had next to nothing last year but this year are also covered in flowers.

    This one has the mangoes that are a bit lemony and mostly 800gm in size.

    What's in your garden?-mango-1-jpg

    This one is best eaten under ripe which i like

    What's in your garden?-mango-2-jpg


    The nest two shots are two Lychees i plants 6 years ago. Weirdly like our Lam Yai the did nothing for 4 years and in the last two years have decided to grow so hopes for some Lychees in a few years. Love them.

    What's in your garden?-lychee-1-jpg

    What's in your garden?-lychee-2-jpg
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails What's in your garden?-mango-1-jpg   What's in your garden?-mango-2-jpg   What's in your garden?-lychee-1-jpg   What's in your garden?-lychee-2-jpg  

  24. #299
    Thailand Expat
    Mendip's Avatar
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    I'm going to check out all the mango trees tomorrow - I just noticed this one as it's right by the front gate. It's strange how different trees fruit different years, and you may get a glut of fruit from one tree while it's neighbour stays bare.

    We also planted lam yai and lychee trees several years ago but they've never looked happy and have never produced fruit. I think maybe it just gets too hot in Korat, whereas down closer to Pak Chong it stays a bit cooler and you may have more luck. Durian, mangosteen and avocado trees I've planted have all eventually died, also I think due to the heat.

    In fact our only real successes have been mango, lemon, lime, pomelo, jackfruit and of course banana!

  25. #300
    Days Work Done! Norton's Avatar
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    Picked today from veg garden.

    What's in your garden?-1578577598017-jpg
    What's in your garden?-1578577784457-jpg
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails What's in your garden?-1578577598017-jpg   What's in your garden?-1578577784457-jpg  

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