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  1. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by Norton View Post
    TeakDoor.com - The Thailand Forum Growing Tomatoes in Thailand
    https://teakdoor.com/farming-and-gard...-thailand.html

    Good luck. Growing tomatoes in tropics never easy.

    The "thai" tomatoes my missus grows are very good if you let them vine ripen. Juicy and nice flavor. The ones you get in the market are often picked unripe so they don't spoil on the shelf.
    What makes you say that. Central Queensland Coast is in the tropics and one of the main crops is Tomatoes, hundreds of acres of it.

  2. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by Happy Dave View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Norton View Post
    TeakDoor.com - The Thailand Forum Growing Tomatoes in Thailand
    https://teakdoor.com/farming-and-gard...-thailand.html

    Good luck. Growing tomatoes in tropics never easy.

    The "thai" tomatoes my missus grows are very good if you let them vine ripen. Juicy and nice flavor. The ones you get in the market are often picked unripe so they don't spoil on the shelf.
    What makes you say that. Central Queensland Coast is in the tropics and one of the main crops is Tomatoes, hundreds of acres of it.
    One could be a purist and suggest that the current variety of tomato strains throughout the world - ranging from very tropical to very alpine [and every clime in between] - have been extremely engineered for those particular sub-climate conditions, as the fruit wouldn't grow there in normal conditions.

    A native to Mexico, and suited to higher altitude/equatorial climes [similar to coffee and tea], one will find a true native quality and substance in tomatoes from these regions.

    We've conditioned ourselves to find the very hybrid varieties [grown everywhere today] as supreme, when they really fall short of such quality regardless of the engineered sub-variety - as that's all we've known for generations.

  3. #28
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    ^ A massive hodgepodge. As usual just a garbled mess.

  4. #29
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    Celebrity tomatoes

    Quote Originally Posted by Humbert View Post
    I've had big beefsteak tomatoes that I bought at Tops that had an off putting taste. The best I've had so far are the Thai tomatoes I raided from my sister-in-law's garden. Something about fresh picked that just can't be beat.
    Has anyone tried the Celebrity tomatoes in Thailand? We grow them in Texas. They are heat resistant and put out lots of large juicy tomatoes. My friend picked 61 off of 3 plants.

  5. #30
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    I have 2 plants in right now but they are the small ones for making spm thom. Wish I could get some decent sends to try. Sranchito, can send some seed over to me please?

    I do want to get some decent size ones for a change. 555

  6. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by Troy View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Davis Knowlton View Post
    I had quite a large tomato farm here for several years. Growing and selling Filipino tomatoes - small, greenish-orange, not very juicy. I tried several varieties of American seeds with mixed and generally disappointing results. Some Beefsteak plants produced some very large, juicy tomatoes, but a very small yield per plant. Roma tomatoes were a total failure. I eventually gave it up. Might try it again this year.
    I remember and thought you had done rather well, with the first crop or two at least.

    At around the same time, tomatoes were being grown in my neck of the woods of Isaan, after main crop rice, around Christmas time. The local farmers were given the seeds and fertilizer from a company who then bought the tomatoes from them at a set price. These were mainly used for their seeds, which were sold around the world, certainly to the EU and quite possibly to the US...

    I can't remember when it all died a death locally to the village, a few years back and probably due to illness of one of the main participants (often the case). A pity because we had a lot of very cheap/free tomatoes during that period and I managed to show off some culinary skills with chutney and jams to the delight of many.

    Hope you enjoy a spot more tomato farming if you get the time....
    the main reason is similar to our locals growing corn ie an extra 10 pc levied on top because of inferior crop making the profit margin far below to that was promised basically a rip off

  7. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by thaimeme View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Happy Dave View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Norton View Post
    TeakDoor.com - The Thailand Forum Growing Tomatoes in Thailand
    https://teakdoor.com/farming-and-gard...-thailand.html

    Good luck. Growing tomatoes in tropics never easy.

    The "thai" tomatoes my missus grows are very good if you let them vine ripen. Juicy and nice flavor. The ones you get in the market are often picked unripe so they don't spoil on the shelf.
    What makes you say that. Central Queensland Coast is in the tropics and one of the main crops is Tomatoes, hundreds of acres of it.
    One could be a purist and suggest that the current variety of tomato strains throughout the world - ranging from very tropical to very alpine [and every clime in between] - have been extremely engineered for those particular sub-climate conditions, as the fruit wouldn't grow there in normal conditions.

    A native to Mexico, and suited to higher altitude/equatorial climes [similar to coffee and tea], one will find a true native quality and substance in tomatoes from these regions.

    We've conditioned ourselves to find the very hybrid varieties [grown everywhere today] as supreme, when they really fall short of such quality regardless of the engineered sub-variety - as that's all we've known for generations.
    Agreed. As I read through the thread, this was what I was going to say, too.
    What are now called heirloom tomatoes are what our grandparents grew in the back yard (many varieties). Maybe mishapen, maybe too big and liable to split, maybe susceptible to adverse climate....all the little imperfections have been bred out of today's commercially grown toms. Taste has been a casualty of this selective breeding.
    I grew some heirloom toms a few years back in Auckland. Funny, grotesque shapes, but wow what a taste. Absolutely delicious as a fruit to munch on, or in salads. And they really make a difference to tomato sauce for pasta.

    It's not good enough to get hybrids. They taste bland.

    My suggestion is to source heirloom toms with regard to climate....most likely Mexican.

  8. #33
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    Didn't there is such a thing as american tomato.
    However I have heard of american potato crisps.

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