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  1. #5076
    Thailand Expat misskit's Avatar
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    She was the coolest woman ever when she played Emma Peel.

  2. #5077
    Thailand Expat harrybarracuda's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by misskit View Post
    She was the coolest woman ever when she played Emma Peel.
    Few people can carve out a career as long as she did.

    For some reason the first thing that came to mind was Extras.


  3. #5078
    Thailand Expat harrybarracuda's Avatar
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    Gave Reggae it's name they did. Brought it to a global audience they did.


    Toots and the Maytals singer Toots Hibbert has died aged 77

    The RIP Famous Person Thread-image4-696x442-jpg

    Toots and the Maytals singer Toots Hibbert has died aged 77, the band have revealed.
    Earlier this month, Hibbert was hospitalised after testing positive for the coronavirus.
    “It is with the heaviest of hearts to announce that Frederick Nathaniel ‘Toots’ Hibbert passed away peacefully tonight, surrounded by his family at the University Hospital of the West Indies in Kingston, Jamaica,” the band’s Twitter account announced.
    “The family and management would like to thank the medical teams and professionals for their care and diligence, and ask that you respect their privacy during their time of grief.
    “Mr. Hibbert is survived by his wife of 39 years, Mrs. D, and his seven of eight children.”


    Hibbert was reported to be in a “stable condition” in hospital at the start of September following his COVID-19 diagnosis. At the time, he was said to be “showing signs of improvement by the hour.”
    Hibbert grew up singing in church, and formed the Maytals in the 1960s. He was a contemporary of his Island Records labelmate Bob Marley, and would go on to appear on stage with the likes of Red Hot Chili Peppers.
    Just a week before Toots’ hospitalisation, Toots and The Maytals released their first album of original material in a decade in the form of ‘Got To Be Tough’.


    In a three-star review of the album, NME‘s Patrick Clarke wrote: “However straightforward the record’s instrumentation, Toots himself remains as unique as ever. His charisma, which always elevated The Maytals above all others, is still evident in force, and the record is at its best when this is pushed to the forefront.
    “On ‘Stand Accuse’, the blaring music drops for a minute into a muted dub as Toots, his voice brilliantly soulful and slightly cracked, express his wishes for more light to come into the world.”
    Tributes have been pouring in online following the news of Hibbert’s death. Ziggy Marley wrote: “i spoke w/him a few wks ago told him how much i loved him we laughed & shared our mutual respect.
    “He was a father figure to me his spirit is w/us his music fills us w/his energy i will never forget him.”



    https://www.nme.com/news/music/toots...ged-77-2751280
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  4. #5079
    Thailand Expat harrybarracuda's Avatar
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    Shere Hite, Who Challenged Myths of Female Sexuality, Dies at 77





    Shere Hite, who startled the world in the 1970s with her groundbreaking reports on female sexuality and her conclusion that women did not need conventional sexual intercourse — or men, for that matter — to achieve sexual satisfaction, died on Wednesday at her home in London. She was 77.

    Her husband, Paul Sullivan, confirmed the death to The Guardian. The newspaper quoted a friend of Ms. Hite’s as saying that she had been treated for Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases.

    Her most famous work, “The Hite Report: A Nationwide Study of Female Sexuality” (1976), challenged societal and Freudian assumptions about how women achieved orgasm: It was not necessarily through intercourse, Ms. Hite wrote; women, she found, were quite capable of finding sexual pleasure on their own.


    However obvious her conclusions might seem today, they were seismic at the time and “sparked a revolution in the bedroom,” as Ms. magazine reported. For all the women who had faked orgasm during intercourse, the Hite Report helped awaken their sexual power and was seen as advancing the liberation of women that was rapidly underway.


    The book became an instant best seller and has been translated into a dozen languages. More than 48 million copies have been sold worldwide.

    What set the Hite Report apart from other studies were the questionnaires at the heart of it. More than 3,000 women were given anonymity in answering the queries, allowing them to write candidly and open-endedly — not in response to multiple-choice questions — about their experiences.

    “Researchers should stop telling women what they should feel sexually and start asking them what they do feel sexually,” Ms. Hite wrote. She described her questionnaires as a “giant rap session on paper.”

    In revelatory first-person testimonials, more than 70 percent of the respondents shattered the notion that women received sufficient stimulation during basic intercourse to reach climax. Rather, they said, they needed stimulation of the clitoris but often felt guilty and inadequate about it and were too embarrassed to tell their sexual partners.


    Their views, coming at the height of Second Wave feminism in the United States, marked a sharp turning point after the “sexual revolution” of the 1960s, which essentially had given women license to have no-strings sex with as many partners as men had always had, but which had done little to change the male-centric dynamic in bed.


    “Most of the respondents to Hite’s questionnaires thought that the sexual revolution was a myth, that it had left them free to say yes (but not to say no),” Erica Jong, author of “Fear of Flying” (1973), wrote in reviewing “The Hite Report” for The New York Times.

    These respondents, Ms. Jong added, felt that “the double standard was alive and well, that the quantity of sex had gone up, not the quality.”


    If women felt liberated, many men were alarmed. They regarded Ms. Hite as an unwelcome messenger who was telling them that they had been doing things all wrong. At the same time, the rising Christian right saw her championing of women’s sexual pleasure as contributing to the dissolution of the family.


    She was further accused of using flawed methodology and skewed sampling, and was castigated in vicious personal terms. Playboy magazine, for which she had once posed topless, called her work “The Hate Report.”

    Some said she should change her name to Sheer Hype.

    Ms. Hite continued to write, following the first Hite Report with “The Hite Report on Men and Male Sexuality” (1981), in which she analyzed questionnaires from more than 7,000 men and concluded that repressed anger and infidelity were common features of American marriages.

    She rounded out her trilogy with “Women and Love: A Cultural Revolution in Progress” (1987), in which questionnaires from 4,500 women led her to conclude that women regarded their relationships with men with “increasing emotional frustration and gradual disillusionment.”


    Both later books were widely criticized as relying on unrepresentative samples of respondents. After the publication of “Women and Love,” which Time magazine said was simply an excuse for her “male-bashing,” Ms. Hite received death threats in the mail and on her answering machine.

    Many dismissed her as an angry feminist, though she had come to her feminism in a roundabout way. As a graduate student at Columbia University, she earned money for tuition as a part-time model. One of the brands she posed for was Olivetti typewriters, which showed her as a leggy blonde caressing the keys. But when she saw the ad’s tagline — “The typewriter so smart, she doesn’t have to be” — she was horrified and soon joined a group of women picketing the Olivetti offices against the very ad she was in.

    That led to her attending meetings of the New York chapter of the National Organization for Women. At one meeting, by her account, the topic was the female orgasm and whether all women had them. There was silence, until someone suggested that Ms. Hite look into the matter. When she saw how little research had been done, she began what would become “The Hite Report.”

    The tidal wave of anger and resentment against her inspired 12 prominent feminists, including Gloria Steinem and Barbara Ehrenreich, to denounce the media assaults on her as a conservative backlash directed not so much against one woman as “against the rights of women everywhere.”


    And it fueled Ms. Hite’s decision to give up her American passport, leave the country and settle in Europe, where she felt her ideas were more accepted.


    “I renounced my citizenship in 1995,” she wrote in 2003 in The New Statesman. “After a decade of sustained attacks on myself and my work, particularly my ‘reports’ into female sexuality, I no longer felt free to carry out my research to the best of my ability in the country of my birth.”


    The New York Times caught up with her in Germany in 1996 in the apartment she shared with her German husband, Friedrich Horicke, a pianist, in Cologne. “The hunted look she had during her last years in the United States has long gone,” The Times wrote, “and she has regained her sense of humor — but only because she is, at last, being taken seriously.”


    Shirley Diana Gregory was born on Nov. 2, 1942, in Saint Joseph, Mo., to Paul and Shirley (Hurt) Gregory. Her mother was 16 at the time, and her father was a serviceman. The marriage ended soon after World War II did. When her mother remarried, Shirley took the surname of her stepfather, Raymond Hite, a truck driver who had adopted her, and started calling herself Shere (pronounced share). After that marriage failed, Shere was raised chiefly by her grandparents, and when they divorced in the mid-1950s, she went to live with an aunt in Florida.

    Ms. Hite received her bachelor’s and master’s degrees in history from the University of Florida at Gainesville in the mid-1960s. She attended graduate school at Columbia, where she started to work toward a doctorate in social history but left when she was told that she could not write her dissertation on female sexuality.


    Ms. Hite married Mr. Horicke, who was 19 years her junior, in 1985 in New York. She moved to Europe with him in 1989, and after relinquishing her American passport in 1995, she became a German citizen. They later divorced, and she settled in north London with her second husband, Mr. Sullivan, who is her only immediate survivor.


    Ms. Hite lectured at universities around the world and wrote several more books, including a memoir, “The Hite Report on Hite: A Sexual and Political Autobiography” (2000). It was her attempt to set the record straight about her life and work and answer her critics.


    In its review of the memoir, The Guardian lamented that a woman who had set out to defy sexism had been condemned as vain and narcissistic.


    “Strip away the sneers,” the newspaper wrote, “and what really scares people about Hite is the fact that she is a beautiful, clever, sexy, self-made woman.”

    https://www.nytimes.com/2020/09/11/b...hite-dead.html
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  5. #5080
    Thailand Expat harrybarracuda's Avatar
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    British design revolutionary Terence Conran dies aged 88


    The RIP Famous Person Thread-_89895406_89895405-jpg

    Sir Terence Conran is credited with bringing the term "lifestyle" into the English language.

    An innovative designer, his Habitat stores were as much a part of the swinging 60s as mini-skirts, The Beatles and Mary Quant.

    He later brought his flair to restaurants and architecture, driven by what seemed to be an inexhaustible store of energy.


    But his flair for design did not always extend to business matters, and he suffered a number of financial setbacks, including the demands on his purse from a series of failed marriages


    Terence Orby Conran was born in Kingston-upon-Thames in Surrey on 4 Oct 1931. His father owned a company that imported products into the UK for use in the manufacture of paints.


    In his childhood, he wandered the countryside catching butterflies, something that launched his fascination for collecting anything he found interesting. At the age of 13, he was blinded in one eye when a piece of metal from a lathe hit him in the face.


    It was while at Bryanston, the Dorset public school, that he first showed a talent for art and gained a practical knowledge of working in wood and metal.


    He went on to the Central School of Art and Design, where he studied textiles, but left after 18 months to take a design job with a company that had been commissioned to work on the 1951 Festival of Britain.

    It was to be the only time in his life when he worked for someone else. A year later, he founded the design group Conran & Company and considerably raised his profile when he was asked to lay out the interior of Mary Quant's second Bazaar shop.

    He also branched out into catering, with the opening of his first Soup Kitchen restaurant in 1953.


    He quickly gained a reputation as something of a taskmaster, and frugal to boot. He rarely took holidays and was reputed to go through the wastepaper baskets in his offices at night for pieces of paper on which had only been used on one side, putting them back onto desks for the next morning.


    By the time Conran & Company had morphed into the Conran Design Group, his stylish furniture was beginning to find favour with a new, upwardly mobile, metropolitan middle-class.

    He was also on his second marriage. Having wed and divorced the architect Brenda Davison within the space of a year, he embarked on a second marriage to Shirley Pearce who, following their divorce in 1962, went on to become the successful author of books such as Lace and Superwoman.

    A year after his third marriage, to Caroline Herbert in 1963, Conran, frustrated by what he saw as the inability of retailers to market his furniture designs properly, opened his first Habitat shop in London's Fulham Road. Two decades before Ikea arrived in the UK, it brought style and simplicity, not to mention flat-pack furniture, into British homes.


    Habitat furnishings and household goods were practical and elegant, distinguished by bright colours and copious use of pinewood.


    His aim, he said, was to democratise good design; he wanted to make it affordable, once suggesting that he aimed his merchandise at "someone on a teacher's salary".

    Customers were soon flocking to his stores to snap up modular shelving and soft furnishing splashed with bright pop-art designs.

    He was the first in Britain to sell duvets, after experiencing the delights of using one while on a trip to Sweden, and he was a huge fan of the cook and culinary entrepreneur Elizabeth David.

    Conran himself, always immaculately turned out, became part of the scene in Swinging London as the city led the world in design, art and music.


    In 1974, he published The House Book, which advised its readers how to plan and design a modern home.

    The Habitat chain eventually formed the nucleus of a retail empire that grew to include first Mothercare, then Heals, Richards Shops and British Home Stores. Conran was chairman and chief executive of the group, which was named Storehouse. His success saw him awarded a knighthood in 1983.

    But recession hit and profits started to fall. Sir Terence lost control after a boardroom row and walked out in 1990, losing Habitat but retaining control of the Conran brand.


    Later he was to say that the different cultures of the various businesses had caused problems - his critics said he was a good designer but a bad businessman. The group later broke up.


    But Sir Terence himself stayed in business as a hands-on proprietor. After his ejection from Storehouse, he took with him a single shop, also called Conran, which was rather more upmarket than Habitat. In due course, a second Conran store opened in London, along with eight more in four other countries.

    He'd also launched a private property company, Butlers Wharf, at Shad Thames on the Thames at Tower Bridge, to convert a complex of listed warehouses into offices and riverside apartments. But the company went into receivership in December 1990, and Conran lost about £6m of his own money.

    He also ran his own architecture and design practice based at Shad Thames; helped found the nearby Design Museum, which was managed by the Conran Foundation; and opened a string of upmarket restaurants, starting with Bibendum, which launched in the former art deco London headquarters of the tyre firm Michelin.


    In 1996, he divorced his third wife after Herbert left him for another man. The high-profile case turned on how great a role she had taken in running Habitat and the restaurant business, and how much of his fortune, estimated at £80m, she was therefore entitled to. The judge awarded her a £10.5m settlement, commenting that "it can be difficult for a man with a healthy ego who has achieved vertiginous success to look down and discern a contribution other than his own".


    Sir Terence married the interior designer Vicki Davis in 2000, although his children only learned of it after the event.


    He continued to open a series of upmarket restaurants and, at the age of 79, returned to his beginnings in mass-market retailing by designing a furniture range for Marks & Spencer.


    He was named as a Companion of Honour in the 2017 Birthday Honours.


    A driven, often difficult man, Sir Terence's revolutionary ideas for new and colourful designs coincided with the end of post-war austerity and the explosion in culture and art which typified the 1960s.


    A new generation of young and more affluent consumers was looking for something exciting and utterly unlike anything their parents had. Terence Conran was on hand to provide it.


    "It's thrilling as a designer when you see something you've designed and built actually being used," he once said. "Seeing a shop filled with people, or a restaurant with people smiling away happily, it's like, gosh, all my dreams have come true."


    Obituary: Sir Terence Conran - BBC News
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  6. #5081
    Thailand Expat David48atTD's Avatar
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    Founding Skyhooks guitarist Peter Starkie dies in 'stupid ladder accident'

    One of the founders of Australian rock band Skyhooks, guitarist Peter Starkie, has died aged 72.

    Key points:
    • Peter Starkie started guitar lessons while living in London in the early 1960s
    • Up until recently, he still enjoyed playing music with fellow Skyhooks band member Peter Inglis
    • He is survived by two daughters, a step-daughter and his partner Dianna


    His brother Bob Starkie, also a member of the band, said Mr Starkie died "in one of those stupid ladder accidents".

    In 1973, Peter Starkie helped launch the band that would go on to record hits such as Living in the 70s, Ego is Not a Dirty Word, Horror Movie and Jukebox in Siberia.



    Founding Skyhooks guitarist Peter Starkie dies in '''stupid ladder accident''' - ABC News
    Last edited by David48atTD; 16-09-2020 at 01:50 PM.
    “Someone is sitting in the shade today because someone planted a tree a long time ago”

  7. #5082
    Thailand Expat David48atTD's Avatar
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  8. #5083
    Thailand Expat

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    Interesting that the singer fell out of the sky in a helicopter and now the guitarist fell out of the sky using a ladder.
    Not enough sky hooks.

  9. #5084
    Thailand Expat misskit's Avatar
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    Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg dies at 87



    Ruth Bader Ginsburg, the Supreme Court justice who was as pioneering as she was brash, died on Friday, the court said. She was 87.


    Despite her diminutive stature, Ginsburg was larger than life, both on and off the bench. Viewed as a feminist icon, she broke countless barriers, never shying away from making controversial comments along the way — with everything from her high court opinions to her octogenarian workout routines earning her the nickname the "Notorious R.B.G." by her rabid fan base.


    Diagnosed with cancer four times, Ginsburg had had numerous health scares, including numerous recent hospitalizations. Her death will open a pivotal seat on the court less than 50 days before the election.

    MORE Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg dies at 87

  10. #5085
    Thailand Expat tomcat's Avatar
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    ...a frail but stalwart bulwark against tRumpism on the Supreme Court...Americans will now have to face the prospect of yet another tRump-favored mediocrity appointed to the bench by a tRump-saturated Senate...

  11. #5086
    Thailand Expat TheRealKW's Avatar
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    Trump will rush to replace her before the elections, no doubt.

  12. #5087
    Hansum Man! panama hat's Avatar
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    Hopefully it will take too long to find, vet and instal someone

  13. #5088
    Thailand Expat tomcat's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by panama hat View Post
    Hopefully it will take too long to find, vet and instal someone
    ...Senate Republican leader Mitch McConnell has already declared he would expedite a tRump nominee to the SC in the event of RBG's death...

  14. #5089
    Thailand Expat harrybarracuda's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by panama hat View Post
    Hopefully it will take too long to find, vet and instal someone
    No it won't. Any norms will go out of the window again.

  15. #5090
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    Klondyke's Avatar
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    Stephen F. Cohen, pre-eminent contemporary American scholar of Russia & USSR, friend of Gorbachev & advisor to Bush, dies at 81
    19 Sep, 2020



    Stephen F. Cohen, the leading American Russia expert of his generation and a celebrated historian of Russia and the Soviet Union, who became a vocal critic of Washington’s “new Cold War” with Moscow, has died at the age of 81.

    Cohen succumbed to lung cancer at his home in Manhattan, on Friday, according to his wife Katrina vanden Heuvel, who is also the part-owner and publisher of The Nation magazine, where he worked as a contributing editor.

    A native of Kentucky, he was a prolific and prominent scholar in his field, serving as a professor emeritus of Russian studies at Princeton University and New York University. As a frequent visitor to Russia, Cohen became well-connected among leading Soviet dissidents, politicians and thinkers in the 1980s, even befriending Soviet premier Mikhail Gorbachev.

    Cohen also advised former US President George Bush, senior, in the late 1980s, and assisted Anna Larina, the widow of Nikolai Bukharin, to rehabilitate her husband's name during the Soviet era. He had earlier written a biography of the journalist and politician, which argued that had Bukharin succeeded Vladimir Lenin as Bolshevik leader, rather than Joseph Stalin, the Soviet Union would have enjoyed greater openness, and perhaps even democracy.

    Breaking with many American academics and political commentators, Cohen was highly critical of Washington’s approach to Russia following the collapse of the Soviet Union. He warned of the dangers of NATO expansion and argued that much of the economic devastation seen in Russia during the 1990s could be traced to bad-faith policies and advice from the United States.

    His principled, and patriotic stand, led to smears from members of the think tank racket and both liberal and neoconservative interventionists, keen to stoke tensions with Moscow. Cohen was labelled a Putin apologist. He responded by saying that he saw him as being "in the Russian tradition of leadership, getting Russia back on its feet."

    Will the Mueller report make the New Cold War even worse? (by Stephen Cohen) Will the Mueller report make the New Cold War even worse? (by Stephen Cohen)
    After the election of Donald Trump, Cohen found himself in the crosshairs of the mainstream media for challenging the now-debunked Russiagate narrative, which he said was being used to sabotage bilateral relations and trigger a “new Cold War” with Moscow.

    The unsubstantiated claim that Trump’s presidential campaign “colluded” with the Kremlin would likely make a US-Russia detente “impossible” and could even help fuel an actual war between the two nations, Cohen argued. He lamented that Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s probe into the conspiracy theory, which found no evidence of collusion, would do little to tone down the fiery rhetoric and anonymously sourced media hysteria concerning Russia and its alleged influence over the US political system.

    Stephen F. Cohen, pre-eminent contemporary American scholar of Russia & USSR, friend of Gorbachev & advisor to Bush, dies at 81 — RT Russia & Former Soviet Union

  16. #5091
    Thailand Expat harrybarracuda's Avatar
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    Prolific Film Actor, Michael Lonsdale, Dies at 89


    The RIP Famous Person Thread-drax-chang-770x470-jpg

    Michael Lonsdale, the British-French actor best known for his role as the villainous Hugo Drax in the Bond film Moonraker, has died at age 89. His agent confirmed this to AFP this morning.

    The actor was not incredibly well known in the United States outside of a James Bond film, but his prevalent career that started in the 1950’s and stretched into the last decade was filled with a plethora of film roles. The actor garnered around 200 credits in both French and English films, including radio and tv appearances as well.


    His most popular roles aside from Moonraker, are The Day of the Jackal(1973), which he gained a
    BAFTA nomination for best supporting actor, Robert De Niro and Jean Reno led Ronin(1998), as well as a role in Spielberg’s Munich(2005).


    His most recent success was in 2011 where he won a
    César for best supporting actor for the 2010 french film Des hommes et des dieux or Of Gods and Men, it was his third nomination for the award.


    Overall, Lonsdale was an actor that garnered some recognition for his lengthy career, but more importantly managed to do it for decades. He made the jump from small french films to a big blockbuster Bond flick, while living a long life.


    He passed away at his home in Paris which was the city that bore him in 1931.

    https://movies.mxdwn.com/news/prolif...le-dies-at-89/
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    Turkey probes death of American journalist Andre Vltchek
    Turkish authorities are investigating the death of an American author and journalist who died while traveling overnight from the Turkish Black Sea coastal city of Samsun to Istanbul
    ByThe Associated Press
    September 23, 2020, 12:43 AM


    ANKARA, Turkey -- Turkish authorities are investigating the death of an American author and journalist who died while traveling overnight from the Turkish Black Sea coastal city of Samsun to Istanbul, Turkey’s state-run news agency reported Tuesday.

    Andre Vltchek, 57, and his wife were traveling inside a rented, chauffeured car and arrived in front of their Istanbul hotel at around 5:30 a.m. Tuesday. His wife tried to wake him up to tell him they had arrived but could not do so, the Anadolu Agency reported.

    Medical teams called to the scene declared him dead, it said.

    The Istanbul chief prosecutor’s office immediately launched an investigation into the death and his body was taken to a forensic medicine institution to be examined, Anadolu reported.

    The private DHA news agency said police recorded his case as a “suspicious death.”

    Turkish media said he was Russian-born and became a naturalized U.S. citizen.

    The couple arrived in Turkey from Serbia on Sept. 12 and spent nine days in Samsun, his wife told investigators, NTV television said. Vtcheck had paralysis in one leg and diabetes and was taking two types of medicine, according to NTV.

    On his website, Vltchek described himself as a novelist, philosopher, filmmaker and investigative journalist as well as a “revolutionary, internationalist and globetrotter who fights against Western Imperialism and the Western regime imposed on the world.”

    He covered dozens of war zones and conflicts, including in Iraq, Sri Lanka, Bosnia, Rwanda and Syria, according to his website.

    Vltchek authored numerous books, including “On Western Terrorism: From Hiroshima to Drone Warfare” with linguist and scholar Noam Chomsky.

    Turkey probes death of American journalist Andre Vltchek - ABC News

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    André Vltchek – Remembered
    By Peter Koenig
    Global Research, September 23, 2020

    André, my good friend and comrade is no more.

    We worked on several investigative projects together. André’s professional rigor, sharpness of understanding, vision and ability to connecting the dots is exemplary.

    We shared some unforgettable moments, when we followed a refugee trail from Bodrum, Turkey, to the Greek Island of Kos in the Aegean Sea – onwards to Athens.

    I’m deeply shocked and saddened beyond words by André’s sudden passing.

    In the night from Monday to Tuesday 22 September, André traveled by chauffeur-driven car with his wife from Samsun on the Black Sea in Turkey to Istanbul. When they arrived in the early morning hours at the hotel and his wife wanted to wake him up, he didn’t react. He had passed away.

    Turkish police said André’s death was “suspicious”. His body was immediately brought to a hospital for forensic analysis.

    André traveled relentlessly from one battle field to another, from one conflict zone to a war zone. He exposed innumerable atrocities committed around the world, mostly by western powers. He never wavered from revealing the truth. From Afghanistan to Syria, Iraq, Iran, Sudan to Argentina, Chile, Peru to Hong Kong, to Xinjiang, the Uygur Autonomous Region of the People’s Republic of China – André was there. He reported on environmental crimes in Borneo, or originally called Kalimantan, Indonesia, where corruption is destroying vital rainforests – the lungs of Mother Earth – for the benefit of western corporations, killing wildlife and annihilating the livelihoods of indigenous people.

    André stood always up for justice, in defense of the poor, for the persecuted, the oppressed – for those that by and large are considered non-people by the elitist Global North; the destitute, the refugees, political prisoners, those that disappear and wither away in the shadows. As an investigative journalist and geopolitical analyst, he fought Supremacist Might for Human Rights.

    André was a true Internationalist. He will be deeply missed.

    May his soul rest in peace and his spirit live on.

    Andre Vltchek – Remembered - Global ResearchGlobal Research - Centre for Research on Globalization

  19. #5094
    Hansum Man! panama hat's Avatar
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    What a cricketer . . . had the good fortune to see him play at the SCG . . .

    From the Archives, 2015: Dean Jones and the baggy green




    A baggy green cap which belonged to cricketing legend Sir Donald Bradman.CREDIT:AP
    I have been very privileged to present Australian caps to Ed Cowan, Stephen O'Keefe and Sean Abbott. This wonderful ceremony was started by Australian great Steve Waugh where he wanted past Australian players to present the baggy treen to the next Test player.
    In Dubai in 2014, there were two players to be presented their baggy greens. One was Mitch Marsh and the other was O'Keefe. My old teammate Geoff Marsh, Mitch's dad, gave a speech so emotional there were tears everywhere. Then it was my turn to present Stephen with his baggy green. Swampy's speech was quite difficult to follow.


    I talked about the importance of the baggy green, told Stephen that he thoroughly deserved his cap and talked about his wonderful journey to get there. Once you finish talking, the debutant places the baggy green on his head for the first time. I will never forget Stephen's smile and the hugs and handshakes that followed.
    Once you have presented each debutant with their baggy green, you strike an affinity with each player. I always look at their performances, hoping they go on to be successful Australian cricketers.
    When I presented each player with their baggy green, they were also given a beautiful embroidered pouch for the cap to go into for protection while on the road. I asked Australian team manager Gavin Dovey if he could arrange one for my own baggy green. He said he would ask.
    I do not like to leave my baggy green in the cupboard. I love taking it to cricket camps and appearances for children and adults to get a closer look at what the famous cap looked like. I believed the pouch would give the baggy green a bit more bling appeal when youngsters looked at it. The pouch is green with gold piping and proudly displays the Australian coat of arms, your name and your Test cap number on it.
    So last Sunday at the WACA Ground, Dovey told me to pop into the Australian dressing room to pick up my pouch. It didn't start off too well. When I approached the dressing rooms there were five security guards looking to move me on. They asked me why I was out the front and who I was. When I was about to leave, Dovey raced out of the rooms to invite me in.


    Once I entered the dressing rooms, a beer was quickly placed in my hand and the Australian team and staff said hello. Then Australian coach Darren "Boof" Lehmann asked the boys to come in for a meeting. Then I started to realise that I was about to receive a proper baggy green presentation. I was starting to feel a little embarrassed as I looked at my feet. Boof requested my old teammate Craig "Billy" McDermott to say a few words about my career and present me with my own baggy green pouch, number 324.
    Billy was nervous, as I was, and yet he spoke with great affection and fondness of our time together that was so much appreciated. Cap presentations were not around in my day. In 1984, my postman Peter Brown delivered my baggy green to my house with my Australian blazer, jumpers and whites for a tour of the West Indies. When I opened the box, Peter saw the baggy green was on top of the clothes. He quickly picked the baggy green up, looked at it and proudly placed it on my head. He then wished me well for the Windies tour, hopped on his bicycle, rang his bell and headed off to finish his round.
    Once Billy started talking about my career, I started to feel quite awkward and overcome with the ceremony. I gazed around the dressing room, the players were listening intently to Billy's every word. I then noticed all the cap pouches displayed proudly in each player's cubicle. It looked really cool.
    When it was my time to respond, I talked about what the cap meant to me. I mentioned to the players not to get too comfortable within these surroundings of the Australian team. Experience tells me your time will go in a flash. So just enjoy the moment. Enjoy your mates and their friendship. Play as long as you can, as you are a long time retired. Then I noticed Mitchell Johnson, who nodded in agreement. Mitch knew his time was done and announced his retirement to the players straight after my presentation.
    I must thank Lehmann, Dovey, Steve Smith and the team for this wonderful initiative for past players who were never given a proper cap presentation. I believe I am the first "old-timer" to receive such an honour from the Australian team. This team constantly gets criticised wrongly for not clapping, shaking players' hands or showing enough sportsmanship. The public doesn't know how much amazing stuff they do with charities, with their fans and past players. They don't seek out the publicity. They do it quietly within their own inner sanctum.


    The whole ceremony was such a humbling experience. As I slowly walked back from the WACA Ground to my hotel, I became quite emotional and reflective on what just happened. There have been 443 players privileged to wear the baggy green cap since 1877. I was thinking how lucky I was to be just one of them.
    I really wished my family was there because they deserved to be part of the ceremony. You don't make it to the top unless you are surrounded by quality people helping you chase your dreams. I wished Keith Stackpole, my coach and mentor when I was young, was there as well. By gee, Stacky showed so much patience in developing my technique and was always there when I needed him throughout my career.
    God, I love this game.

    https://www.smh.com.au/sport/cricket/from-the-archives-2015-dean-jones-and-the-baggy-green-20200925-p55z3b.html

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    Thailand Expat harrybarracuda's Avatar
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    Already posted in the RIP Sporting Heroes thread.

    He was an unpleasant person by all accounts.

    Publicly calling Amla a "terrorist" on his commentary (which cost him his job) was a good example.

    There are other stories I know of in private that support it.

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    Quote Originally Posted by harrybarracuda View Post
    Already posted in the RIP Sporting Heroes thread.

    He was an unpleasant person by all accounts.

    Publicly calling Amla a "terrorist" on his commentary (which cost him his job) was a good example.

    There are other stories I know of in private that support it.
    Completely opposite to what I understand.

    Top bloke by all accounts. The terrorist gaffe is not how somebody should be remembered, but sadly these days, mistakes like that define you. Thank fuck my cock ups were never recorded...

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    Thailand Expat peaches's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by harrybarracuda View Post
    Already posted in the RIP Sporting Heroes thread.

    He was an unpleasant person by all accounts.

    Publicly calling Amla a "terrorist" on his commentary (which cost him his job) was a good example.

    There are other stories I know of in private that support it.
    “ The envious die not once , but as oft
    as the envied win applause “

    Baltasar Gracian.

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    Kuwait Emir Sheikh Sabah Al Ahmad Al Jaber Al Sabah dies at age 91



    The RIP Famous Person Thread-106119832-1568050536075gettyimages-1133965380-jpg


    Kuwait’s emir, Sheikh Sabah Al Ahmad Al Jaber Al Sabah, who ruled over his oil-rich country since 2006 and had been its foreign minister for 40 years, including during Saddam Hussein’s invasion, has died. He was 91.

    He is expected to be succeeded by his 83-year-old half-brother, Crown Prince Sheikh Nawaf Al Ahmad Al Sabah.

    “With great sadness and sorrow, we mourn to the Kuwaiti people, the Arab and Islamic nations, and the friendly peoples of the world, the death of the late His Highness Sheikh Sabah Al-Ahmad Al-Jaber Al-Sabah, Emir of the State of Kuwait who moved next to his Lord,” the royal palace said in a statement, according to state media. Tuesday’s announcement didn’t say when he died or where.

    Kuwait, a country of 4.2 million people, is a strategically located country wedged between Saudi Arabia and Iraq at the mouth of the oil-rich Gulf. It has one of the world’s largest oil reserves.

    Sheikh Sabah underwent surgery in July 2020 for an unspecified medical problem and was flown to the United States for further treatment. Before doing so, he temporarily handed over some of his responsibilities to the crown prince, the state-run KUNA news agency said.

    The sheikh had canceled a visit in early September 2019 with President Donald Trump at the White House after being hospitalized in the U.S., according to KUNA. This followed an unspecified health “setback” in August.

    “The president wishes his friend, the Emir, a speedy recovery and looks forward to welcoming him back to Washington as soon as he is feeling better,” the White House said in a statement at the time. “The Emir is a well-respected leader and has been a tremendous partner of the United States in tackling challenges in the region.”

    https://www.cnbc.com/2020/09/29/kuwaiti-emir-sheikh-sabah-al-ahmad-al-sabah-dies-at-age-90.html?fbclid=IwAR3Qcm6Bj1-iReIPRiFV87lC0k_phkIC-Ay1f_m8vUzeGDPFQAuGtizMDto

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    Helen Reddy Dead - 'I Am Woman' Singer Dies at 78

    The RIP Famous Person Thread-helen-reddy-dies-73-jpg



    Helen Reddy has sadly passed away.

    The “I Am Woman” singer and feminist activist died at the age of 78 on Tuesday (September 29), her family announced in a statement on
    Facebook.


    “It is with deep sadness that we announce the passing of our beloved mother, Helen Reddy, on the afternoon of September 29th 2020 in Los Angeles,” her children Traci and Jordan wrote. “She was a wonderful Mother, Grandmother and a truly formidable woman. Our hearts are broken. But we take comfort in the knowledge that her voice will live on forever.”


    Helen had 20 hits on the Billboard Hot 100 songs chart in her lifetime, including three No. 1s – the Grammy Award-winning “I Am Woman,” “Delta Dawn” and “Angie Baby.”



    Helen Reddy Dead – ‘I Am Woman’ Singer Dies at 78 | Helen Reddy, RIP : Just Jared
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails The RIP Famous Person Thread-helen-reddy-dies-73-jpg  

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