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  1. #4801
    Thailand Expat

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    Quote Originally Posted by cyrille View Post
    ^^ Always seemed like a true gent, who commanded respect even from people with no interest in motorsport.

    People like...me, for example.

    His return within weeks from that horrible accident took true cojones.
    Worth watching if you haven’t seen it. Excellent documentary.

    https://www.imdb.com/title/tt3056202/

  2. #4802
    Thailand Expat misskit's Avatar
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    Elder statesman Prem dies at 98

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    Privy Counil President General Prem Tinsulanonda passed away on Sunday morning due to heart failure. He was 98.

    He was rushed to hospital early in the morning when he did not get up at his usual time of 5 am, according to a source close to him.


    Medical personnel at Phramongkutklao Hospital spent about three hours trying to resuscitate Prem but failed. He passed away at around 8am.

    Prem’s aides at his Sisao Thewet residence said that the former premier had shown no signs of any serious health problem before going to bed on Saturday night.


    General Prem’s royally-sponsored bathing rite is scheduled for 6pm on Monday at Benchamabophit Temple, his family said.
    The ceremony will be presided over by Her Royal Highness Princess Maha Chakri Sirindhorn.


    The elderly statesman had served as president of the Privy Council during the reigns of HM King Bhumibol Adulyadej as well the current monarch, HM King Maha Vajiralongkorn.


    Prem was born on August 26, 1920, in the southern province of Songkhla. He joined a cavalry unit of the Royal Thai Army after completing military school and rose to the position of Army commander-in-chief.


    He was Thailand’s 16th prime minister, serving three terms from 1980 to 1988. Later, Prem was appointed a Privy Council member in August 1988. He became the president of the royal advisers in September 1998.

    Elder statesman Prem dies at 98
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  3. #4803
    Thailand Expat misskit's Avatar
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    Singer Leon Redbone Dies at 69

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    Singer-songwriter Leon Redbone, who specialized in old-school vaudeville and Tin Pan Alley-style music, died Thursday, his family confirmed. No cause of death was given for the notoriously private performer. He was 69, although, in characteristically deadpan fashion, the official statement announcing his death gave his age as 127.


    Although Redbone’s pop-defying predilection for seemingly antiquated musical styles of the ’20s and ’30s made him the unlikeliest of stars, he became one anyway, appearing several times as the musical guest on “Saturday Night Live” — including two spots in the inaugural 1975-76 season alone — and landing frequent appearances with Johnny Carson on “The Tonight Show” into the 1980s. Later popular successes had him singing the themes for TV’s “Mr. Beledevere” and “Harry and the Hendersons,” along with contributing a duet of “Baby, It’s Cold Outside” with Zooey Deschanel to the soundtrack of “Elf,” for which he also voiced the animated character of Leon the Snowman.

    MORE https://variety.com/2019/music/news/...69-1203229012/

    watch?feature=youtu.be&v=jGUW0uAwDyw
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  4. #4804
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    DrJohn obituary

    Pianist,singer and songwriter steeped in the musical forms and voodoo cultureof his native New Orleans
    Wherevermusicians gathered, Dr John, who has died aged 77, was revered assongwriter, singer, arranger and pianist. He became closelyidentified with the rich musical roots of his native NewOrleans andas well as his mastery of the Crescent City’s various musical forms(which included blues, jazz, funk, boogie-woogie and rock’n’roll)he was steeped in its mysterious voodoo culture and folklore.
    Hebegan to develop a cult following with the release of his firstmajor-label album, Gris-Gris (1968), a startling brew of voodoo funkand strange incantations, epitomised by the eerie eight-minute mantraI Walk on Guilded Splinters. Nobody had heard anything like it,including his label boss, AhmetErtegun.“Ahmet asked me: ‘What is this record you gave me … Why didn’tyou give me a record that we could sell?’” Dr John recalled. Hetook the album on tour with a show resembling a bayou magic act,decking himself out in outlandish feathers, witch-doctor robes andheaddresses. For a time the act also featured a man calling himselfPrince Kiyama, who would bite the heads off live chickens onstage.



    Twofollow-up albums to Gris-Gris – Babylon (1969) and Remedies (1970)– began to make him influential friends, including Eric Clapton andMick Jagger, who both appeared on The Sun, Moon & Herbs (1971),and in 1973 he released the biggest selling album of his career, Inthe Right Place. Produced by AllenToussaint andwith the Meters as backing band, it reached No 24 on the Billboardalbum chart and gave him a US Top 10 hit single with Right Place,Wrong Time. It also included Such a Night, which Dr John wouldperform at the Band’s 1976 farewell concert, filmedby Martin Scorsese as The Last Waltz.He failed to reach such sales heights again, but was widely acclaimedacross the rest of his career, and won six Grammys for various albumsand singles.
    DrJohn’s real name was Malcolm John Rebennack, the same as hisfather. Rebennack Sr ran an appliance shop in the East End of NewOrleans, fixing radios and televisions and selling records. “Mac”grew up listening to his father’s hoard of 78s by blues artistssuch as Big Bill Broonzy and Memphis Minnie, jazz by Louis Armstrong,Miles Davis and King Oliver, and country music from Hank Williams andRoy Rogers. His mother, Dorothy (nee Cronin), who had been a fashionmodel and made her own clothes and hats, arranged for her baby son tofeature in advertisements for Ivory soap in the 1940s.
    Hisfamily was intensely musical, with numerous aunts, uncles and cousinswho were amateur musicians. From a young age Mac attended local gigsand, with his father’s assistance, visited recording sessionsat thefabled J&M Studio.It was a meeting with the piano player Professor Longhair when he was14 that persuaded him to pursue a musical career, and he beganperforming at local clubs. When Jesuit high school told him he mustchoose between schooling and music, he picked the latter. Proficienton piano and guitar, at 15 he began playing on recording sessions andaccompanied artists such as Art Neville, Toussaint and Joe Tex. By 16he had started producing tracks and was hired as an artists andrepertoire man by Johnny Vincent at Ace Records.

    In1960 he was involved in a fight when playing a show in Jackson,Mississippi, and had the ring finger of his left hand almost shotoff. He eventually recovered the use of the finger, but it affectedhis guitar playing and caused him to concentrate on the piano.Working in the New Orleans clubs, he became embroiled in the criminalunderworld of drugs and prostitution, and acquired a heroin addictionwhile dealing drugs himself.
    Aftercompleting a two-year jail sentence in Fort Worth, Texas, for drugpossession in 1965, he moved to Los Angeles and soon was in greatdemand as a studio session musician. He played on countless tracksfor the producer Phil Spector for artists including the Ronettes andthe Righteous Brothers, worked with ArethaFranklin andRoberta Flack, recorded with Bob Dylan and DougSahm andplayed with FrankZappa,until Zappa sacked him for using drugs.
    Gris-Griswas recorded on studio time borrowed from Sonny & Cher, with whomhe had been working in Los Angeles and who had helped him secure adeal with Atco records. Produced by HaroldBattiste,another New Orleans native transplanted to the West Coast, it markedthe first appearance of Rebennack’s pseudonym Dr John Creaux, aliasDr John the Night Tripper.
    AfterThe Sun, Moon & Herbs he brought out the album Dr John’s Gumbo(1972), conceived as a tribute to New Orleans music, particularly thecompositions of Professor Longhair. Following the positive reactionto In the Right Place in 1973, his next album, Desitively Bonnaroo(1974), was much less successful and it proved to be his last albumwith Atco. He moved to United Artists for the live album Hollywood BeThy Name (1975), which was also received unenthusiastically.
    Fromthe mid-70s onwards Dr John began a long partnership with thesongwriter DocPomus thatled to songs for his albums City Lights and Tango Palace (both 1979).He then made the solo piano album Dr John Plays Mac Rebennack (1981),a virtuosic showcase of his keyboard skills, and repeated the featwith The Brightest Smile in Town (1983). In 1989, the year he signedto Warner Bros and finally put his heroin addiction behind him, hereleased In a Sentimental Mood, a sleekly-produced collection ofstandards including Makin’ Whoopee, a duet with Rickie Lee Jonesthat earned the pair a Grammy for best jazz vocal performance. He wonanother Grammy for his second Warners album Goin’ Back to NewOrleans (1992), this time for best traditional blues album.

    In1994 he published his autobiography, Under a Hoodoo Moon: The Life ofThe Night Tripper (co-written with Jack Rummel), a lurid memoir ofhis musical life in New Orleans that did not shy away from detailsabout drugs, violence, prostitution and the dark side of the musicindustry. Nonetheless he was beginning to assume the aura of arespected senior citizen, winning a third Grammy in 1996 for thetrack SRV Shuffle from the album A Tribute to Stevie Ray Vaughan, anda fourth in 2000 for his duet with BB King on Is You Is Or Is YouAin’t My Baby. Duke Elegant (2000) comprised John’s takes onfavourite Duke Ellington pieces, while Mercernary (2006) was histribute to another classic songwriter, Johnny Mercer.
    Theobliteration of New Orleans by Hurricane Katrina in 2005 spurred DrJohn to release the fundraising EP SippianaHericane,and then City That Care Forgot (2008), an album-length tribute to hisgrievously wounded home town. It won him Grammy number five, in thebest contemporary blues album category, and in 2013 Locked Downbrought him a sixth for best blues album. New Orleans was on his mindonce again when he made Ske-Dat-De-Dat: Spirit of Satch (2014), ahomage to Armstrong, the city’s founding father of jazz.
    DrJohn performed or recorded with innumerable other artists, includingthe Rolling Stones, Van Morrison, Levon Helm, Ringo Starr and hisAll-Starr Band, HarryConnick Jr and GreggAllman.He also appeared on the all-star charity version of LouReed’sPerfect Day in 1997. Among memorable covers of his own songs wereversions of I Walk On Guilded Splinters by Cher and then Paul Weller,and Right Place Wrong Time by Tom Jones. He was inducted into theRock and Roll Hall of Fame in 2011.
    Heis survived by his wife, Cat Yellen. Other surviving family membersinclude three daughters, Tara, Jennifer and Karla, from two earliermarriages that ended in divorce, and his sister, Barbara. Anotherdaughter, Jessica, died in 2003


    DrJohn (Malcolm John Rebennack Jr), musician, born 20 November 1941;died 6 June 2019

  5. #4805
    Thailand Expat lom's Avatar
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    R.I.P Night Tripper, tnx for the music!
    May the bridges I burn light my way

  6. #4806
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    Interesting article in the New York Times by Robert D. McFadden gives a snippet into the life of Gloria Vanderbilt who died on monday at age 95.

    Gloria Vanderbilt, 1924-2019

    Quite an amazing story of wich I had no idea. Her collection of Little orphan Anne memorabilia took me by surprise as did the custody battle between her mother and her aunt.

    I was unaware that Anderson Cooper of CNN was her son or that another son, Carter Cooper, "fell to his death from her Manhattan penthouse at 23. He had been hanging from a terrace wall and, despite her please, as she later described the moment, let go."

    From the New York Times obituaries Tuesday, June 18, 2019.
    Last edited by fishlocker; 19-06-2019 at 11:30 AM.

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    The RIP Famous Person Thread-pri_71487154-e1561546446869-jpg

    Actor Bryan Marshall, who was perhaps best known for appearing in a classic James Bond film, has died aged 81. British-born Marshall was famous for playing a commander in 1977’s The Spy Who Loved Me. Marshall’s agent Esta Charkham of ECA confirmed the news in a tweet on Wednesday, saying: ‘So sad that my dear old chum Bryan Marshall has gone on ahead. A wonderful actor – he was so good you never noticed how good he was. ‘He was a valued chum. His credits are a catalogue of classic British and Australian TV. ‘Fare Forward Dearest Bryan.’ As tributes for Marshall pour in, let’s take a closer look at the highlights of his career.


    What TV shows and movies was actor Bryan Marshall in? Marshall kicked his acting career off by appearing in an episode of Teletale in 1964, and two years later, he had a role in Alfie, which starred Michael Caine, in 1966. After that, his role in The Spy Who Loved me was that of Commander Talbot whose submarine is captured at the beginning of the film and is later rescued by Bond. In 1980, he played Harris in The Long Good Friday, which starred Bob Hoskins and Helen Mirren. He also appeared in episodes of the Australian soap operas Neighbours and Home & Away.

    In addition to acting, Marshall was a presenter on the television show Australia’s Most Wanted in 1989, which was a spin-off of America’s Most Wanted. His most recent part was that of Cora’s Uncle in 2012’s TV mini-series A Moody Christmas.

    https://metro.co.uk/2019/06/26/tv-shows-movies-james-bond-actor-bryan-marshall-10074237/
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  8. #4808
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    Billy Drago, Hollywood actor who starred in more than 100 films, dies aged 73


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    Billy Drago, star of the Untouchables and horror film the Hills Have Eyes, has died. The 73-year-old suffered a stroke in Los Angeles, it has been announced.

    A former journalist, he moved into acting in the late 1970s and appeared in films such as Cutter's Way, Windwalker and No Other Love.

    He was beginning to make a name for himself on the big screen and later moved on to television.

    He worked on Hill Street Blues and Moonlighting before securing roles in Walker Texas Ranger and cult- sifi favourite The X-Files.

    Starting out as a stuntman before getting his big break, he went on to make more than 100 films.

    He played parts alongside Chuck Norris in Delta Force 2: The Colombian Connection as drug lord Ramon Cota, he impressed in Mysterious Skin.

    Drago also loved music and appeared in Michael Jackson’s You Rock My World music video in 2001.

    He lost wife Silvana Gallardo, who died in 2012, but is survived by son Darren Burrow, himself an actor.

    https://www.mirror.co.uk/3am/celebri...r-who-17263501
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    Lee Iacocca, father of the Ford Mustang, dies aged 94
    3 July 2019

    Lee Iacocca, the car industry legend who created the iconic Ford Mustang and saved Chrysler from bankruptcy, has died at the age of 94.

    He died at his home in Los Angeles from complications from Parkinson's disease, a family spokeswoman told US media.

    Mr Iacocca is also remembered for his appearances in Chrysler ads in the US, pointing at viewers and telling them: "If you find a better car, buy it!"

    Born to Italian immigrant parents in Allentown, Pennsylvania in 1924, Mr Iacocca began his career as an engineer at the Ford Motor Company in 1946, before later moving into sales.

    He had a natural flair for marketing, and his first campaign in the mid-1950s caught the eye of the company's executives. Shortly afterwards, he was relocated to its headquarters in Dearborn, Michigan.

    In 1964 he cemented his place in history by designing and launching the Ford Mustang, which sold 419,000 in its first year and would later become known one of America's most iconic cars.

    However, he was fired by the company in 1978 after being accused of plotting to oust Chairman Henry Ford II and take over his position.

    But a year later, in 1979, Mr Iacocca took over Chrysler Corporation. The company was on the verge of collapse, and so he led it through a strict restructuring process that included taking a $1.5 billion government bailout (£1.2bn at current exchange rates). Mr Iacocca famously accepted a salary of just $1 a year while the company was recovering.

    It eventually paid off. In 1983, he announced with pride that they were repaying the government loans seven years early.

    Last edited by prawnograph; 03-07-2019 at 05:01 PM.

  10. #4810
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    Met him a few times through mutual friends and shared a few beers at Newmarket once. A marvellous character and hugely knowledgeable.

    "Burlington Bertie One Hundred to Thirty!". No-one said it with his gusto.

    RIP John.

    John McCririck: Legendary racing pundit dies aged 79


    The RIP Famous Person Thread-_107757406_johnmccririckbodygetty-jpg

    Legendary racing pundit John McCririck, who for many years was the face of British horse racing, has died at a London hospital on Friday aged 79.

    McCririck made his career as the face of Channel 4's racing coverage, famous for his loud, eccentric style and his signature deerstalker hat.

    He also appeared on reality TV shows such as Celebrity Big Brother, Celebrity Wife Swap and Celebrity Coach Trip.

    He is survived by his wife Jenny.


    His family said he had been ill in recent months but continued to make several TV and radio appearances.

    McCririck worked for BBC Sport early in his career as a sub-editor on Grandstand when the programme was presented by the likes of Frank Bough and Des Lynam.

    He went on to write for The Sporting Life where he won British Press Awards 'Specialist Writer of the Year' and 'Campaigning Journalist of the Year'.


    McCririck's profile grew when he energised racing broadcasts with lively updates from the betting ring, where he was not afraid to berate punters playing the fool in the background.


    When he was axed by Channel 4 in 2012, he launched a claim for age discrimination.


    "I have put my own personal future on the line," he said. "But I think it's so important for people in their 30s up to their 70s who fear anonymous suits and skirts coming along and getting rid of them."


    He lost the case, and with it a significant amount of money, although he became a regular on reality TV shows.


    McCririck would make disparaging remarks about his wife Jenny, nicknaming her 'The Booby', but in truth they were a strong and happy couple.


    "It's all a pantomime. Do I look like someone who is downtrodden?" said Jenny.


    McCririck was still a regular sight - often smoking a fat cigar - at big race meetings in recent years although ill health meant he missed the Epsom and Royal Ascot fixtures last month.


    Viewers were shocked when he appeared frail and gaunt during one broadcast, although he retained his humour and ability to generate debate throughout.

    With a trademark deerstalker hat, his side whiskers and his waving arms plus a booming voice, McCririck became one of the most familiar faces on British television.


    A former bookmaker and award-wining journalist, his career took off as the betting specialist on Channel 4 Racing from the mid-1980s.


    He brought to wider audiences the secret 'tic-tac' communication system of the racecourse betting ring, with its unique terms including 'Burlington Bertie 100 to 30' and 'Double Carpet 33 to 1'.


    With his controversial views - particularly what was seen as a sexist attitude towards women including his wife Jenny - McCririck was dropped by Channel 4 in 2012.


    Latterly, he made only occasional TV and media appearances but lost none of his flamboyance.


    I have lost count of how many times people have come up to me and said 'do you know that mad guy with the whiskers who waves his arms around and shouts on the TV at the races - what's he really like?'


    The answer was that he was a complex character: a colourful pundit and showman who brought horse racing to a wider audience, but also courted controversy of course. He was a campaigning punters' champion and a generous and supportive colleague.


    He was practically the definition of the expression 'one-off'.

    https://www.bbc.com/sport/horse-racing/48881290
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  11. #4811
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    João Gilberto obituary
    One of the most important figures in Brazilian music who was known as the father of bossa nova



    João Gilberto, who has died aged 88, was one of the most important and best loved figures in Brazilian music, who played a key role in the development of bossa nova in the late 1950s and early 60s.

    Along with the composer Antônio Carlos “Tom” Jobim, he created a romantic, reflective new style in which samba rhythms were mixed with influences from the American “cool jazz” scene. As a guitarist, he pioneered a new technique that mixed the syncopated plucking of acoustic guitar chords with jazz-influenced harmonies and chord progressions, while as a singer his style was laid-back and understated.

    Bossa nova was a new, cool and sophisticated style that reflected the optimism of Brazil in the early 60s and initially became popular among middle and upper-class Brazilian music fans. Then its popularity began to spread.

    Along with other leading Brazilian musicians, Gilberto appeared at a now legendary concert at Carnegie Hall, New York, in 1962, and the following year he released the album Getz/Gilberto with the American saxophonist Stan Getz, who had become fascinated by bossa nova. The album included the single Girl from Ipanema, sung by Astrud Gilberto, to whom Gilberto was then married. It sold more than a million copies, and brought him international acclaim.

    It was an extraordinary achievement for a musician who had initially struggled to succeed and find acceptance for his music. Born in Juazeiro in Bahia state, he began playing the guitar as a teenager, forming a band while still at school. He tried working as a singer on a radio station in Salvador, the capital of Bahia, and at the age of 19 moved to Rio de Janeiro as singer with the Garotos da Lua, but was fired because he could never be trusted to turn up for rehearsals.

    He now found himself out of work and depressed, and after a period working with a vocal group in the southern city of Porto Alegre, he moved to Minas Gerais state to live with his elder sister. Here he spent months practising, and perfecting his new musical style.

    In 1956 he eventually returned to Rio, and his fortunes changed. Jobim was impressed by the new approach, and set about finding a suitable song for the new bossa nova style. Chega de Saudade was written by Jobim with lyrics by a third hero of the early bossa movement, Vinicius de Moraes, and became the first bossa nova hit.

    It was followed by a full album with the same title. In 1959, the new music enjoyed international success when Gilberto and Jobim helped to contribute the music for the cult film Orfeu Negro (Black Orpheus), in which the Greek myth was re-told in the setting of a Brazilian carnival.

    It won an Academy Award for best foreign language film in 1960, and the Palme D’Or at the 1959 Cannes film festival, and was helped by a soundtrack that included Gilberto’s recording of A Felicidade. America began to discover a brand new, cool and sophisticated Brazilian music, and the bossa nova boom began.

    Soon, US jazz musicians would be visiting Brazil to hear the new music for themselves. In 1961, the guitarist Charlie Byrd arrived, and inevitably he found his way to “Bottle Alley” in Rio de Janeiro, where bossa musicians gather and collaborated with jazz players such as Sérgio Mendes.

    Byrd returned home excited by what he had heard, and on his return to the US he recorded the album Jazz Samba with Getz. It became a best-seller, staying in the American charts for 70 weeks – an astonishing achievement for a jazz album.

    It was now inevitable that Gilberto would be invited to perform in the US, and in November 1962 he played in New York at an historic concert that also featured Jobim, Mendes and other Brazilian artists including Carlos Lyra, alongside Byrd and Getz.

    According to some of the Brazilian musicians, the concert was something of a mess – Lyra claimed “they just wanted to do a recording session on stage” – but this was a high-profile event that helped to boost Gilberto’s reputation in the US. And there was further American success to come.

    In 1964 he and Getz released Getz/Gilberto, which included the massively successful Girl from Ipanema, written by Jobim and Moraes as they sat in a bar off Copocabana beach in Rio, watching the girls go by, and still one of the most celebrated songs of the bossa nova era.



    João Gilberto, seated with guitar, performs with Stan Getz on saxophone. Photograph: Tom Copi

    Bossa nova had become a new global pop fashion, thanks very largely to Gilberto, but in 1964 the Brazilian music scene suddenly changed. A military coup ended the years of optimism, and Brazil’s easy-going, romantic image was shattered.

    New styles would now emerge, from protest songs to the experiments of the Tropicália movement, and leading musicians Caetano Veloso and Gilberto Gil would later be jailed and then exiled by the authorities. Many of the bossa nova stars – including Gilberto – simply decided to stay in the US, where their music was so popular.

    Gilberto remained in self-imposed exile until 1980. He made further recordings with Getz, and with Herbie Mann, spent two years living in Mexico, where he also recorded, but spent much of his time practising, playing privately, and reviving songs by earlier Brazilian composers.

    On returning to Brazil, he also began to work with a younger generation of Brazilian musicians, and in 1981 he recorded the album Brasil with Veloso, Gil and Maria Bethânia, who regarded Gilberto as a hero of Brazilian music.

    In an interview in 2007, Caetano told me that he first heard Gilberto when he was 17, and it was “like enlightenment for me. It was like an incredible revelation of everything, of aesthetic criteria and deep emotions, and most of all, hope in Brazil … hope in our future, and the idea that we had a kind of mission. I still think João Gilberto is our greatest artist.”

    Gilberto continued to tour and record, though he always insisted that the acoustics in a concert hall should be excellent, and that audiences should remain quiet. He performed in the US and Europe, and became a cult hero in Japan, where there was an enthusiastic following for bossa nova. One of his finest live recordings, João Gilberto in Tokyo, was released in 2004.

    He was a recluse, and an eccentric perfectionist, and Brazilian musicians delighted in telling stories about him. Lyra described him as “a fantastic artist and a very special man, very neurotic like all of us, but probably a little more so”.

    Gilberto was very fond of cats, and Lyra re-told with some glee the story of how one of his cats was allegedly driven to jump from an eighth-floor window, driven crazy by his master’s constant repetition of a guitar phrase.

    His daughter, the singer Bebel Gilberto, described him like this: “My father changed Brazilian music. I would sometimes see him seeking for different chords for classics he’s been playing for 14 years. I can’t believe his obsession – always seeking for perfection, something that could be better, a version that no-one had thought of before.”

    He is survived by João Marcelo, his son from his marriage to Astrud, which ended in divorce; Bebel, his daughter from his marriage to the singer Miúcha, who died in 2018; and Luisa Carolina, his daughter from a relationship with the journalist Claudia Faissol.

    https://www.theguardian.com/theguard...berto-obituary

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    Joao Gilberto, Antonio Carlos Jobim a Stan Getz year 1964.


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    Eddie Jones, Pa Kent on 'Lois & Clark,' Dies at 84


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    Eddie Jones, the dependable stage veteran who portrayed the kindly Pa Kent on the ABC series Lois & Clark: The New Adventures of Superman, has died. He was 84.


    Jones died Saturday at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, his wife, Anita Khanzadian-Jones, told The Hollywood Reporter.

    Jones also played the widowed father of Megan Cavanagh's second baseman Marla Hooch in A League of Their Own (1992) and was Samuel Riddle, the owner of War Admiral and Man o' War, in Seabiscuit (2003).


    His solid big-screen résumé also included Bloodbrothers (1978), The First Deadly Sin (1980), Prince of the City (1981), Trading Places (1983), Year of the Dragon (1985), Stanley & Iris (1990), Cadillac Man (1990), The Grifters (1990), The Rocketeer (1991), Sneakers (1992), Return to Me (2000) and The Terminal (2004).


    Jones recurred as Jonathan Kent, the husband of Martha Kent (K Callan) and father of Clark Kent/Superman (Dean Cain), on 87 episodes of Lois & Clark, which ran for four seasons, from 1993 through 1997.


    He also starred as the head of a spy agency on the 2000-02 Syfy Channel/syndicated series The Invisible Man and more recently showed up on episodes of Veep and Aquarius.


    Born on Sept. 18, 1934, in Washington, Pennsylvania, Jones hitchhiked to California and was working at a gas station when he was spotted by an agent, triggering his career as an actor.


    He eventually made his way back east and understudied for Charles Durning as George Sikowski in the original 1972 Broadway production of Jason Miller's Pulitzer Prize-winning That Championship Season.


    Jones also starred in the original 1978 production of Sam Shepard's family tragedy Curse of the Starving Class and was an off-Broadway regular for the Manhattan Theatre Club, Playwrights Horizons, The Public Theatre and The Hudson Guild.


    He starred as Nick in a national tour of Edward Albee's Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf? and won an L.A. Drama Critics Circle Award for his portrayal of Willy Loman in an Interact Theatre Company production of Death of a Salesman. (He and his wife were longtime members of the Los Angeles-based group.)


    Interact said he appeared in more than 250 plays during his long career.


    In addition to his wife — they were together for 43 years — survivors include his sisters, Elaine and Marilyn, and several nephews and nieces.

    https://www.hollywoodreporter.com/news/eddie-jones-dead-pa-kent-lois-clark-stage-veteran-was-84-1222901
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  16. #4816
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    H Ross Perot, US billionaire and ex-politician, dies aged 89

    Perot, a self-made Texas billionaire, ran for US president as a third-party candidate twice in the 1990s.

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    H Ross Perot, the colourful, self-made Texas billionaire who rose from a childhood of Depression-era poverty and twice ran for president as a third-party candidate, has died at the age of 89.
    Perot, whose 19 percent of the vote in the 1992 United States presidential race stands among the best showings by an independent candidate in the past century, died early Tuesday at his home in Dallas surrounded by his family, spokesman James Fuller said.
    As a boy in Texarkana, Texas, Perot delivered newspapers from the back of a pony. He earned his billions in a more modern way, however - by building Electronic Data Systems Corp (EDS), which helped other companies manage their computer networks.
    Yet the most famous event in his career didn't involve sales and earnings; he financed a private commando raid in 1979 to free two EDS employees who were being held in a prison in Iran. The tale was turned into a book and a movie.
    Perot first became known to Americans outside of business circles by claiming that the US government left behind hundreds of American soldiers who were missing or imprisoned at the end of the Vietnam War. Perot fanned the issue at home and discussed it privately with Vietnamese officials in the 1980s, angering the Reagan administration, which was formally negotiating with Vietnam's government.


    Perot's wealth, fame and confident prescription for the nation's economic ills propelled his 1992 campaign against President George HW Bush and Democratic challenger Bill Clinton. Some Republicans blamed him for Bush's lost to Clinton as Perot garnered the largest percentage of votes for a third-party candidate since former President Theodore Roosevelt's 1912 bid.
    During the campaign, Perot spent $63.5m of his own money and bought up 30-minute television spots. He used charts and graphs to make his points, summarizing them with a line that became a national catchphrase: "It's just that simple."


    Perot's second campaign four years later was far less successful. He was shut out of presidential debates when organisers said he lacked sufficient support. He got just eight percent of the vote, and the Reform Party that he founded and hoped to build into a national political force began to fall apart.
    However, Perot's ideas on trade and deficit reduction remained part of the political landscape. He blamed both major parties for running up a huge federal budget deficit and letting American jobs to be sent to other countries. The movement of US jobs to Mexico, he said, created a "giant sucking sound".
    Perot continued to speak out about federal spending for many years. In 2008, he launched a website to highlight the nation's debt with a ticker that tracked the rising total, a blog and a chart presentation.

    https://www.aljazeera.com/news/2019/07/ross-perot-billionaire-ran-president-dies-aged-89-190709144107397.html
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  17. #4817
    Thailand Expat misskit's Avatar
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    Rip Torn, 'Larry Sanders Show' star, dead at 88

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    New York (AFP) - Oscar-nominated actor Rip Torn, best known for his roles in the cult TV series "The Larry Sanders Show" and the Hollywood blockbuster "Men in Black", died at the age of 88 on Tuesday, his publicist said.


    Torn built a reputation as a formidable actor in film, TV and theater, and was also known for his volatility -- he once admitted he "got angry easily", according to The New York Times.


    "Torn passed away peacefully this afternoon... at his home in Lakeville, Connecticut, at the age of 88 with his wife Amy Wright, and daughters Katie Torn and Angelica Page by his side," publicist Rick Miramontez said in a statement.


    Born Elmore Rual Torn on February 6, 1931 -- the nickname "Rip" came from his father -- he won praise for his early theater performances, including a Tony nomination in 1960 for his performance in the Tennessee Williams play "Sweet Bird of Youth".


    He was nominated for an Oscar for his role in the film "Cross Creek", losing out to Jack Nicholson in the supporting actor category at the 1984 Academy Awards.


    In the 1990s, Torn was cast in "The Larry Sanders Show", a cult comedy series that is widely considered one of the most influential in the modern era of television. He played Artie, the producer of a fictional late-night TV show.
    Torn won an Emmy Award in 1996 for his performance in the series.


    The Texas-born actor also starred alongside Will Smith in "Men in Black", one of the biggest Hollywood blockbusters of the 1990s.


    Smith posted an image on Instagram, showing him with Torn in a "Men in Black" scene, with the message: "R.I.P. Rip."
    Actor and director Albert Brooks, who worked with Torn on the 1991 film "Defending Your Life", also paid tribute.


    "I'll miss you Rip," he tweeted. "You were a true original."


    Torn had almost 200 TV and film credits, his publicist said.


    He was involved in the Disney animated hit "Hercules", voicing the Greek god Zeus, and also acted in a number of comedy films and TV shows, including appearances on the acclaimed TV series "30 Rock".



    https://news.yahoo.com/rip-torn-larr...081649702.html
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  18. #4818
    Custom user Neverna's Avatar
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    A politician with an unfortunate surname has passed away.

    Veteran Indian politician Sheila Dikshit dies at 81



    The former chief minister of Delhi Sheila Dikshit has died aged 81, following a long illness.

    The veteran politician was the longest-serving chief minister of the Indian capital, serving for three terms from 1998 to 2013.

    Dikshit also served as the governor of the southern state of Kerala and as president of the main opposition Congress Party in Delhi.

    Ms Dikshit passed away on Saturday afternoon at a hospital in the capital.

    https://www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-india-49056791
    Nev has style

  19. #4819
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    César Pelli, architect behind the Petronas Towers, dies at 92

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    The architect César Pelli, who designed some of the world’s tallest and best-known buildings, has died. He was 92.

    Anibal Bellomio, a senior associate architect at Pelli’s studio in Connecticut, confirmed that the Argentinian-born American citizen died peacefully on Friday at his home in New Haven.


    Pelli was a former dean of the
    Yale University School of Architecture and a lecturer at the school, where he received an honorary degree.


    The Argentinian president, Mauricio Macri,
    wrote on Twitter: “I want to send my condolences to the family and friends of the talented César Pelli. The works he leaves throughout the world as a legacy are a pride for all Argentines.”

    In his own tweet, the Pulitzer Prize-winning architecture critic Paul Goldberger saluted “a warm and gracious man, a civilising presence in his life and his work, an architect of great dignity and lively creativity who did as much as anyone in the last generation to evolve the form of the skyscraper.”




    One of Pelli’s best-known projects is the Petronas Towers in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, twin 1,483ft skyscrapers that were once the tallest buildings in the world. He also designed the Salesforce Tower in San Francisco and the World Financial Center, now known as Brookfield Place, in downtown Manhattan.

    https://www.theguardian.com/artandde...ers-dies-at-92
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  20. #4820
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    Actor David Hedison, who appeared in two James Bond films, dies at 92


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    David Hedison, the US actor best known for playing Felix Leiter opposite two James Bonds, has died at the age of 92.

    He first played 007's CIA ally in 1973's Live and Let Die, the late Sir Roger Moore's first Bond film.

    He returned to the role 16 years later to appear alongside Timothy Dalton in 1989's Licence to Kill.


    He was also turned into an insect in the 1958 film The Fly and starred in 1960s submarine TV series Voyage to the Bottom of the Sea.

    Seven years after Live and Let Die, he appeared with Sir Roger again in the 1980 oil rig drama North Sea Hijack.

    The friends were reunited once more in 2007 when Hedison delivered a speech at the unveiling of Sir Roger's star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame.


    When Hedison returned to the world of James Bond for Licence To Kill, his character survived being fed to a shark by a drug lord who also murdered his new bride.


    His many other credits included The Colbys, The Love Boat, The Fall Guy and Dynasty.


    Hedison was sanguine about his career, admitting that most films he had appeared in were "pictures you never want to see again".

    He once remarked: "When I know they'll be on TV I have a dinner party and invite my friends over so they can't see them."

    Hedison's death was announced by his daughters Alexandra and Serena, who paid tribute to his "warm and generous heart".


    "Our dad brought joy and humour wherever he went and did so with great style," they said.


    Several actors have played Felix Leiter in the Bond film series, beginning with Jack Lord in 1962's Dr No. Jeffrey Wright, who has played the role since 2006's Casino Royale, is set to return in 007's next big-screen outing.

    https://www.bbc.com/news/entertainment-arts-49077424
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  21. #4821
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    Chris Kraft, legendary flight director, dies at 95


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    Former Johnson Space Center Director Christopher Columbus Kraft Jr., the man who created the iconic role of NASA flight director during the Mercury and Gemini programs and whose no-nonsense, uncompromising management style defined control room operations and discipline through the Apollo years and beyond, died Monday. He was 95.

    “America has truly lost a national treasure today with the passing of one of NASA’s earliest pioneers – flight director Chris Kraft. We send our deepest condolences to the Kraft family,” said NASA Administrator Jim Bridenstine.

    “Chris was flight director at some of the most iconic moments of space history, as humans first orbited the Earth and stepped outside of an orbiting spacecraft. … We stand on his shoulders as we reach deeper into the solar system, and he will always be with us on those journeys.”


    A legendary figure at the Johnson Space Center and across the agency, Kraft once said he set up mission control to monitor spacecraft systems, interact with astronauts in space and to stand ready, spring-loaded to “figure out all the things that could go wrong and be prepared to to deal with them.”


    “We called those mission rules,” he once told visitors to the Kennedy Space Center during a question-and-answer session. “And we wrote all the procedures, both for ourselves and the astronauts and called those malfunction procedures. So we each knew what was expected of each other. We depended on each other, we integrated the astronauts in to doing the job in space and we did the job on the ground to keep them there and accomplish the missions.”


    At the launch site, he said, “when you’re preparing a spaceship and something goes wrong, you try to figure out how to fix it. It’s a little different for the flight control team, because they didn’t have any spares around in a spaceship. So we had to try to figure out how to accomplish the mission even though the equipment was malfunctioning.”


    The techniques pioneered by Kraft and young flight directors who followed in his footsteps, men like Gene “failure is not an option” Kranz, the urbane Glynn Lunney and more, saved the Apollo 13 crew from the brink of disaster in the aftermath of an explosion on the way to the moon that severely damaged the spacecraft.


    Once comparing his complex work as a flight director to a conductor’s, Kraft said, ‘The conductor can’t play all the instruments, he may not even be able to play any one of them,'” Bridenstine said. “‘But, he knows when the first violin should be playing, and he knows when the trumpets should be loud or soft, and when the drummer should be drumming. He mixes all this up and out comes music. That’s what we do here.’”

    Kraft was in the flight director’s chair at Cape Canaveral on May 5, 1961, when Alan Shepard blasted off aboard a Redstone rocket to become the first American in space. The flight came a month after the Soviet Union sent cosmonaut Yuri Gagarin into orbit, a major psychological blow in the West at the height of the Cold War.

    Shepard’s flight was a short, up-and-down suborbital mission, but it helped restore lost confidence and played a major role in President John F. Kennedy’s decision, announced on May 25, 1961, to commit the nation to sending an astronaut to the moon before the end of the decade. That promise was kept with the Apollo 11 moon landing 50 years ago on July 20, 1969.


    “I had many proud moments,” Kraft recalled. “I think Alan Shepard was certainly a flight where I learned to be a flight director because until you put a human being on the end of a rocket, you don’t really understand the problem. I was pretty nervous, I was pretty exhilarated when it was over, as was Alan Shepard.


    “Certainly, (John) Glenn’s flight was a great flight for all of us and then each one got better. Apollo 8 was probably my most exhilarating moment because I was the guy who had talked management into putting the vehicle around the moon and then in orbit around the moon. That was pretty exciting and pretty demanding on my heart, I suppose.”


    Apollo 8 is considered one of NASA’s most daring missions. It marked only the third flight of a gargantuan Saturn 5 rocket, the first flight of the booster to carry a crew and the first mission to carry humans beyond low-Earth orbit.


    “It was his legendary work to establish mission control as we know it for the earliest crewed space flights that perhaps most strongly advanced our journey of discovery,” Bridenstine said. “From that home base, America’s achievements in space were heard across the globe, and our astronauts in space were anchored to home even as they accomplished unprecedented feats.”


    Born Feb. 28, 1924, in Phoebus, Virginia, Kraft earned a bachelor’s degree in aeronautical engineering from Virginia Tech in 1944 and joined the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics, or NACA, the precursor to NASA. He later was assigned to the Space Task Group that spearheaded development of NASA’s Mercury program.

    According to his book “Flight: My Life In Mission Control,” Kraft said his boss Chuck Matthews told him to “come up with a basic mission plan. You know, the bottom-line stuff on how we fly a man from a launch pad into space and back again. It would be good if you kept him alive.”

    The mission control concept developed by Kraft called for a team of experts, focused on specific systems and subsystems, coordinated by a director, and all following a set of previously thought-out rules and procedures designed to handle virtually any eventuality.


    “I saw a team of highly skilled engineers, each one an expert on a different piece of the Mercury capsule,” he wrote. “We’d have a flow of accurate telemetry data so the experts could monitor their systems, see and even predict problems, and pass along instructions to the astronaut.”


    Kraft served as flight director for all six of the original one-man Mercury missions and seven of the 10 two-man Gemini flights that perfected the rendezvous and spacewalk techniques needed for the Apollo moon program. He served as director of flight operations until the Apollo 13 mission when he became deputy director of the Johnson Space Center.


    He took over as director in 1972 and held the post until 1982, overseeing the center through the initial development of the space shuttle. He retired from NASA in 1982, but remained active as a consultant and NASA advisor. Appropriately enough, mission control at the Johnson Space Center was renamed in Kraft’s honor in 2011.


    Always outspoken, in an interview for a NASA oral history project, Kraft described the space shuttle as the safest spacecraft ever built despite the booster O-ring failure that doomed the Challenger in 1986 and the foam debris that brought down Columbia in 2003.


    “We had two failures, which were catastrophic. Both were the fallacies of man, not the fallacies of the machine,” he said. “(Challenger) was a failure of the human brain, not of the machine. We should have fixed it. Same is true of the debris. Eventually they were playing Russian roulette.


    “So take what Chris Kraft says with a grain of salt. I say the machine has never really failed. There is no rocket, even with those two failures, that has the success rate of the space shuttle. It’ll be a cold day in hell when that is improved on.”

    https://spaceflightnow.com/2019/07/22/chris-kraft-legendary-flight-director-dies-at-95/
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  22. #4822
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    Li Peng, the Butcher of Bejiing is dead. The fucking worthless scumbag deserves no more than that mention. Rot in hell you PoS.

  23. #4823
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    Art Neville, Founding Member of The Meters and The Neville Brothers, Dead at 81

    Art Neville, member of the Neville Brothers and founding member of the Meters, died today at the age of 81, as the Times-Picayune reports. The legendary keyboardist’s passing comes after “years of declining health,” according to the paper.


    Nicknamed “Poppa Funk,” Neville’s first major claim to fame was singing on the Hawkette’s iconic 1954 recording of “Mardi Gras Mambo,” which has remained an enduring Mardi Gras standard. Neville was the leader of the Neville Sounds band throughout the early 1960s before the group solidified its lineup and became known as the Meters in 1965. As the group rose to popularity in the late 1960s, their lineup consisted of Neville, Ziggy “Zigaboo” Modeliste, Leo Nocentelli, and George Porter, Jr. The band released their debut self-titled album in 1969, along with its beloved followup Look-Ka Py Py. The band helped define the New Orleans funk sound with songs like “Cissy Strut,” “Sophisticated Cissy,” “Fire on the Bayou,” and “Hey Pocky A-Way.” They served as session musicians for a variety of other acts in and outside New Orleans, backing up Allen Touissant, Paul McCartney, Dr. John (on his 1973 album In the Right Place), Robert Palmer (on his 1974 album Sneakin’ Sally Through the Alley) and more. The group dissolved in 1977.

    MORE https://www.spin.com/2019/07/art-neville-obituary/

  24. #4824
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    Rutger Hauer: Blade Runner actor dies aged 75




    Actor Rutger Hauer, who starred in 1982's Blade Runner, has died at the age of 75.
    The star died in the Netherlands on Friday after a short illness, his agent confirmed.


    Hauer played the murderous replicant Roy Batty in Blade Runner, which was directed by Ridley Scott and also starred Harrison Ford.
    The actor's funeral was held on Wednesday.



    Hauer's character gives a famous speech during a face-off with Ford at the end of Blade Runner, dialogue which he helped write himself.

    "I've seen things you people wouldn't believe," he is seen telling Ford. "Attack ships on fire off the shoulder of Orion. I watched C-beams glitter in the dark near the Tannhäuser Gate. All those moments will be lost in time, like tears in rain. Time to die."

    (my favourite scene in one of my favourite movies)


    https://www.bbc.com/news/entertainment-arts-49098435


    RIP Ruter
    “Someone is sitting in the shade today because someone planted a tree a long time ago”

  25. #4825
    Thailand Expat misskit's Avatar
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    ^ Nooo! Not Rutger! He was just beautimus.

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