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  1. #51
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    Quote Originally Posted by OhOh View Post
    I was not, do you remember the thread title?
    Not too long ago. Use the search function. I am switch, not google.

  2. #52
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    Quote Originally Posted by OhOh View Post
    Was There Slavery in Australia? Yes. It Shouldn’t Even Be Up for Debate

    Thalia Anthony and Stephen Gray show how the prime minister’s assertion is at odds with the historical record.
    Thalia ANTHONY, Stephen GRAY

    Attachment 52760

    In 1891 a “Slave Map of Modern Australia” was printed in the British Anti-Slavery Reporter.

    "Prime Minister Scott Morrison asserted in a radio interview that “there was no slavery in Australia.”

    This is a common misunderstanding which often obscures our nation’s history of exploitation of First Nations people and Pacific Islanders.

    Morrison followed up with “I’ve always said we’ve got to be honest about our history”. Unfortunately, his statement is at odds with the historical record.


    This history was widely and publicly documented, among other sources, in the 2006 Australian Senate report Unfinished Business: Indigenous Stolen Wages.


    What is Slavery?


    Australia was not a “slave state” like the American South. However, slavery is a broader concept. As Article 1 of the United Nations Slavery Convention says:

    Slavery is the status or condition of a person over whom any or all of the powers attaching to the right of ownership are exercised.

    These powers might include non-payment of wages, physical or sexual abuse, controls over freedom of movement, or selling a person like a piece of property. In the words of slavery historian Orlando Patterson, slavery is a form of “social death”.


    Slavery has been illegal in the (former) British Empire since the Act for the Abolition of the Slave Trade of 1807, and certainly since 1833.


    Slavery practices emerged in Australia in the 19th century and in some places endured until the 1950s.

    Early Coverage of Slavery in Australia

    Attachment 52758

    “Governor Davey’s Proclamation” board, painted in 1830 and nailed to trees to depict a policy of friendliness and to show that colonists and Aboriginal people were equal before the law. (Government of Van Diemen’s Land, original conception by Surveyor General George Frankland, State Library of New South Wales, Wikimedia Commons)

    As early as the 1860s, anti-slavery campaigners began to invoke “charges of chattel bondage and slavery” to describe north Australian conditions for Aboriginal labour.


    In 1891 a “Slave Map of Modern Australia” was printed in the British Anti-Slavery Reporter, a journal that documented slavery around the world and campaigned against it.


    Reprinted from English journalist Arthur Vogan’s account of frontier relations in Queensland, it showed large areas where:


    … the traffic in Aboriginal labour, both children and adults, had descended into slavery conditions.


    Seeds of Slavery in Australia

    Some 62,000 Melanesian people were brought to Australia and enslaved to work in Queensland’s sugar plantations between 1863 and 1904. First Nations Australians had a more enduring experience of slavery, originally in the pearling industry in Western Australia and the Torres Strait and then in the cattle industry.


    In the pastoral industry, employers exercised a high degree of control over “their” Aboriginal workers, who were bought and sold as chattels, particularly where they “went with” the property upon sale.

    There were restrictions on their freedom of choice and movement. There was cruel treatment and abuse, control of sexuality, and forced labour.


    A stock worker at Meda Station in the Kimberley, Jimmy Bird, recalled:


    … whitefellas would pull their gun out and kill any Aborigines who stood up to them. And there was none of this taking your time to pull up your boots either. No fear!


    Aboriginal woman Ruby de Satge, who worked on a Queensland station, described the Queensland Protection Act as meaning:

    if you are sitting down minding your own business, a station manager can come up to you and say, “I want a couple of blackfellows” … Just like picking up a cat or a dog.



    Through their roles under the legislation, police, Aboriginal protectors and pastoral managers were complicit in this force.

    Slavery was Sanctioned by Australian Law

    Attachment 52759

    Aboriginal slavery. (Nancy White, Flickr)

    Legislation facilitated the enslavement of Aboriginal people across the Northern Territory, Western Australia, South Australia and Queensland. Under the South Australian Aborigines Act 1911, the government empowered police to “inspect workers and their conditions” but not to uphold basic working conditions or enforce payment. The Aboriginals Ordinance 1918 (Cth) allowed the forced recruitment of

    Indigenous workers in the Northern Territory, and legalised the non-payment of wages.

    In Queensland, the licence system was effectively a blank cheque to recruit Aboriginal people into employment without their consent. Amendments to the Aboriginal Protection and Restriction of the Sale of Opium Act 1897 gave powers to the Protector or police officer to “expend” their wages or invest them in a trust fund – which was never paid out.

    Officials were well aware that “slavery” was a public relations problem. The Chief Protector in the Northern Territory noted in 1927 that pastoral workers:


    … are kept in a servitude that is nothing short of slavery.


    In the early 1930s, Chief Protector Dr. Cecil Cook pointed out Australia was in breach of its obligations under the League of Nations Slavery Convention.

    ‘… it certainly exists here in its worst form’


    Accusations of slavery continued into the 1930s, including through the British Commonwealth League.

    In 1932 the North Australian Workers’ Union (NAWU) characterised Aboriginal workers as “slaves.”

    Unionist Owen Rowe argued:


    If there is no slavery in the British Empire then the NT is not part of the British Empire; for it certainly exists here in its worst form.


    In the 1940s, anthropologists Ronald and Catherine Berndt surveyed conditions on cattle stations owned by Lord Vestey, commenting that Aboriginal people:

    … owned neither the huts in which they lived nor the land on which these were built, they had no rights of tenure, and in
    some cases have been sold or transferred with the property.

    In 1958, counsel for the well-known Aboriginal artist Albert Namatjira argued that the Welfare Ordinance 1953 (Cth) was unconstitutional, because the enacting legislation was:


    … a law for the enslavement of part of the population of the Northern Territory.

    Profits from Slaves

    Australia has unfinished business in repaying wages to Aboriginal and South Sea Islander slaves. First Nations slave work allowed big businesses to reap substantial profits, and helped maintain the Australian economy through the Great Depression. Aboriginal people are proud of their work on stations even though the historical narrative is enshrined in silence and denial.


    As Bundjalung woman Valerie Linow has said of her experiences of slavery in the 1950s:

    What if your wages got stolen? Honestly, wouldn’t you like to have your wages back? Honestly. I think it should be owed to the ones who were slave labour. We got up and worked from dawn to dusk … We lost everything – family, everything. You cannot go stealing our lousy little sixpence. We have got to have money back. You have got to give something back after all this country did to the Aboriginal people. You cannot keep stealing off us."


    Proving that you can find support for minorities anywhere in the world.

    Two things you need to understand:

    Australia was originally a penal colony, settled by white westerners, using white slave labour to develop the country.
    The indigenous peoples had been predominantly a transient race, moving frequently to utilize available resources. When the country eventually reached democracy, control was exercised over the Aboriginals, and their inclusion in the occupied settlements became more de veloped.

    Its important to understand the time frame and infrastructure necessary to achieve this state of affairs. You cannot uninvent the historic settlement of that country nor can you judge the current standards of that country, based on your poor understanding of history.


    Imagine trying to settle a country as big as Australia today? With abundant resources confined to coastal areas. A troublesome native population was only one difficulty to overcome.
    Now all people are considered equal, and rightly so. Now our understanding of such settlement is more refined, and our view of humanity has changed.
    It took the native population 50,000 years to exploit the abundant resources. The settlers took 200 years.

    Those factual results contain no judgement by me on which approach to settlement is right, only that historical perspective is required to even attempt such judgments objectively.

  3. #53
    Hansum Man! panama hat's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Switch View Post
    settled by white westerners
    Make it easy for him: British, mainly, as non-indigenous Australians didn't exist then, not for a very long time afterwards, at last 100 years.

    Quote Originally Posted by Switch View Post
    Two things you need to understand:
    In reality there are far more . . . but he won't listen, rather he'll reply with some long-winded article on imported Kanaks to the Qld cane-fields (there's a hint there for you OhOh - naughty white people. Naughty Australians)

  4. #54
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    For anyone interested in how the West was won Google "Battle of Pinjarra".

  5. #55
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    What I never see anyone offering up is a solution to this obviously massive problem. Throwing money at it clearly doesn't work, although those in the Aboriginal industry might argue that point , so what's the answer? All whitey's to leave Australia and let them go back to throwing sticks at Kangaroos and each other?

  6. #56
    Thailand Expat David48atTD's Avatar
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    ^ nah ... the Chinese would just invade and rename it New South China!

    Judging by what has occurred to the Uyghurs

  7. #57
    Hansum Man! panama hat's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Headworx View Post
    What I never see anyone offering up is a solution to this obviously massive problem
    That's odd because this has been a feature for decades, many options tried and many failed. It simply isn't a cookie-cutter issue and even declaring it an aboriginal probem is wrong as one tribe differs from the next.

    There is no doubt that Aboriginals have been murdered en masse, dehumanised, marginaised etc etc for centuries and yes, the 98% of the population that isn't Abiroginal, though government, needs to keep trying to solve the issue and keep it solved, which is an ongoing problem.

    Quote Originally Posted by Headworx View Post
    Throwing money at it clearly doesn't work, although those in the Aboriginal industry might argue that point
    Yup, the vast, cast majority being white

    Quote Originally Posted by Headworx View Post
    All whitey's to leave Australia and let them go back to throwing sticks at Kangaroos and each other?
    You really think that's what many are advocating . . . and what were our ancestors doing?

    Quote Originally Posted by David48atTD View Post
    ^ nah ... the Chinese would just invade and rename it New South China!
    Yea, hardly . . . the bogey-man for Oz has always been Indonesia and ther policy of populating as many aras as they can with Javanese

  8. #58
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    Quote Originally Posted by panama hat View Post
    In reality there are far more . . . but he won't listen, rather he'll reply with some long-winded article on imported Kanaks to the Qld cane-fields (there's a hint there for you OhOh - naughty white people. Naughty Australians)
    Of course there are many more. My opinion was condensed for the benefit of the intended recipient. Small steps eh. ����

  9. #59
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    Probably best not mentioning Tasmania then..

  10. #60
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    Shhh....don't mention the war

  11. #61
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    Quote Originally Posted by David48atTD View Post
    the Chinese would just invade and rename it New South China!
    No need to invade Australia it, along with another 101 countries of the world, has already signed up and paid their subs to join the club of the AIIB?

    Their citizens will reap their rewards/dividends, subject to Australian Government's decision.

    Australia 3 April 2015[48] 29 June 2015 10 November 2015, USD 3,691,200,000 with 39,323 votes.

    of course China has invested the most and has the most votes:

    China[a] 24 October 2014 29 June 2015 26 November 2015 USD 29,780,400,000 with 300,215 votes

    Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank - Wikipedia

    AIIB Web site here:

    Home - AIIB

    'arry might like to read this:

    General Conditions for Sovereign-backed Loans

    https://www.aiib.org/en/policies-str...arch-clean.pdf
    Last edited by OhOh; 18-06-2020 at 09:30 PM.
    A tray full of GOLD is not worth a moment in time.

  12. #62
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    Quote Originally Posted by panama hat View Post
    but he won't listen
    I am eager to be educated on Australian History. What I'm finding is massacres, robbing Aborigines of their land, herded into 'compounds" managed by overseers, funds being utilised for the gatekeepers lifestyles, their all drunken bums ....

    Not unusual in Britain's Empire.

    Put up here or point me to the thread where this has all been discussed previously. Where I might be educated.

    My knowledge of Australian History is dismal; Captain Cook planting a Union Jack and it being run as a prison to empty English jails of the 'ne'er-do-wells". A few snippets of 20 pound tickets for emigrants, nothing of any substance.

  13. #63
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    ^ Read a good book about Australian history rather than relying on threads on a shitfest and shitpost forum.

  14. #64
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    Quote Originally Posted by David48atTD View Post
    ^ nah ... the Chinese would just invade and rename it New South China!

    Well.....they were exploring, "discovering", and settling in Oz long before Europeans came around.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Neverna View Post
    Read a good book about Australian history
    But what "good book about Australian history" will be found useful?

    Anyone, suggest some?

  16. #66
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    FFS. Don't bother. Get yourself an education first.

  17. #67
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    Quote Originally Posted by Neverna View Post
    ^ Read a good book about Australian history rather than relying on threads on a shitfest and shitpost forum.
    It's only a 'shitfest' and 'shitpost' forum because posters like you make it such.

  18. #68
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    I've always found Australian history fascinating.

    It's an amazing country, that I'm very glad to have lived in and traveled throughout.


    The most interesting historical period is 40,000-70,000 years ago wrt early human migration.

    Quote Originally Posted by Neverna View Post
    Read a good book about Australian history
    ISBN, please.

    Thanks.

  19. #69
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    But what "good book about Australian history" will be found useful?

    Anyone, suggest some?
    The Fatal Shore, by Robert Hughes. Excellent book.

  20. #70
    Hansum Man! panama hat's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by OhOh View Post
    My knowledge of Australian History is dismal
    You could have left out 'Australian History'
    Last edited by panama hat; 19-06-2020 at 05:24 AM.

  21. #71
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    Quote Originally Posted by HuangLao View Post
    Well.....they were exploring, "discovering", and settling in Oz long before Europeans came around.
    Where and when did Chinese people explore or settle in Australia before 1606 / 1788 ?

  22. #72
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    Chinese people certainly traded with the Torres Strait Islanders, in the far north of Australia. Makkasans from Indonesia too, and the Dutch also made contact with them. This before Capt Cook.

  23. #73
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    Quote Originally Posted by Edmond View Post
    ISBN, please.

  24. #74
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    Good guys in, bad guys out!

  25. #75
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    Quote Originally Posted by Edmond View Post
    I've always found Australian history fascinating.
    It's an amazing country, that I'm very glad to have lived in and traveled throughout.
    Lulu, its not quite the same history regards settlement, convicts were sent there, you were convicted and left there.

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