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  1. #376
    Thailand Expat
    aging one's Avatar
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    I have always loved the photographic skills of a former poster here who went by bobcock. Great guy in real life as well.

    Indian Sadhu during Holi.

    Portraits. People from any time any place.-10342471_1437408493179536_7630429361460045572_n-jpg

  2. #377
    Thailand Expat Dillinger's Avatar
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    Thats some lived in face. Looks a bit like you AO

  3. #378
    ความรู้ลึกลับ HuangLao's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dillinger View Post
    Thats some lived in face. Looks a bit like you AO

    Ouch.
    Though, could be construed as a compliment.

    It's all good.

  4. #379
    Isle of Discombobulation
    Chittychangchang's Avatar
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    Clint Eastwood, 90 yesterday.



    Keith Moon


    Bob Dylan


    Debbie Harry


    Cher


    Pete Townsend


    Roger Moore



    Steve McQueen



    Bob Marley


    Dame Diana Rigg and Dame Helen Mirren on the set of A Midsummer Night’s Dream (1968)..



    Brigitte Bardot.


    The Specials

  5. #380
    Isle of Discombobulation
    Chittychangchang's Avatar
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    Image copyrightANDY GOTTSImage captionJohn Cleese, Eric Idle, Terry Jones, Michael Palin and Terry Gilliam ahead of the 50th anniversary reunion of Monty PythonAndy Gotts' photographic career began 30 years ago when, as a student, he persuaded Stephen Fry to pose for him. Since then he has photographed the biggest names in the entertainment business. Here, he remembers a few of those who have been captured by his camera.
    Paul Newman

    Image copyrightANDY GOTTSOne of the highlights of my career, without doubt, was spending time with the legendary actor Paul Newman. Paul was the most gentleman of gentlemen. Kind, witty and always had a knowing smile.
    I have never shown this picture before.
    The reason I have kept this specific shot to myself over the years is that it was taken at the very moment Paul gave me the nickname One Shot Gotts.
    He would not believe any photographer could get the shot so quickly. So when I exclaimed… "Mr Newman, we have it."
    He retorted with a huge smile.
    "Mr Gotts your reputation is justified, you really are a one-shot guy. Hey you're One Shot Gotts."
    Kylie Minogue

    Image copyrightANDY GOTTSI have known of her since her stint in Neighbours and she always seemed fun and bubbly, and I was not disappointed. As the minute hand struck the hour, she arrived exactly on time and full of energy.
    When the shoot started it did not take many shots before the fun began when she started to dance and spin, and then in the very last shot she lowered her head and flicked her hair back just like a shampoo commercial.
    Samuel L Jackson

    Image copyrightANDY GOTTSSam oozes coolness and is every bit the lovely guy you would think he would be.
    This shoot took place in Beverly Hills and Sam turned up in a neon orange T-shirt with matching Bermuda shorts and baseball cap.
    We had a great chat and I had plenty of time to get a rapport going. As I was setting up the lighting Sam took his bag to the bathroom and got changed. When he emerged he was dressed in black and there stood Mr Cool.
    The shoot was great fun and here are a few out-takes, an unseen contact-sheet of us just looning around.
    Meryl Streep

    Image copyrightANDY GOTTSI shot Meryl at the Soho Hotel when she was doing a press junket for The Iron Lady and was in and out of interviews all day, but she graciously made time for me.
    I wanted some strong lighting and atmosphere in the shots, so I played with having a light directly over Meryl's head to give more of an iconic feel.
    All at once the door was flung open and in breezed Ms Streep and she was warm and welcoming and very keen to be snapped by me. Following close behind, was her personal make-up artist who said a quick hello then toddled off to find a quiet corner.
    We began shooting and I started with the usual soft lighting, to ease into the session. It was going swimmingly with lots of banter back and forth. I then changed to the more dramatic lighting and within seconds a voice boomed across the room:
    "Ms Streep is never lit like that in her photographs."
    It was her make-up artist and he started giving some disapproving shakes of the head in the direction of Meryl.
    I saw the lighting was actually great, so I briefly stopped shooting and asked him if he could fetch me the PR guy so we can look at softer lighting options.
    As soon as the make-up guy left the room I started shooting with my preferred overhead flashes, giggling to myself like a naughty schoolboy. By the time the make-up guy returned, Meryl and I had finished the shoot and were saying our goodbyes. To this day I stand by my lighting choices and still smile to myself knowing how I achieved them.
    Tony Curtis

    Image copyrightANDY GOTTSI had a trip to LA planned so I dropped Tony a note saying I was on the West Coast.
    To my shock, I received a note back saying if I travelled to Vegas, I could shoot him at his house. I was thrilled and literally was counting the days down before I flew to the US.
    The day before I left, my mobile phone rang and I saw it was his number.
    I answered with a heavy heart as I was expecting him to cancel the shoot, but instead in a quiet and humble voice he said:
    "Andy I know you are coming to photograph me tomorrow and I have seen your amazing work. I'm not in a good way at the moment but can I ask you one thing? Can you make me look like an icon just one more time?"
    It didn't take me long to think of my flag idea as I knew his nickname was the American Prince. But meeting Tony was one of the highlights of my career as not only was he one of my icons but he was also a sweet guy.
    Little was I to know Tony would die a few days later and this would be the very last portrait taken of him.
    Morgan Freeman

    Image copyrightANDY GOTTSI shot velvet-toned Morgan Freeman in London while he was filming Batman Begins. I was all set and awaiting the grand entrance, and was not disappointed when this 6'4" frame of a cinema legend entered the room.
    Morgan is usually shot in a very iconic, almost holy-looking way so I wanted something a little different. I asked how he entertained his grandchildren when they hung out together and he retorted that he pulled goofy faces to make them laugh.
    I suggested we could play around with a "passport booth" style of shots, and the man had a little bit of fun.
    Clint Eastwood

    Image copyrightANDY GOTTSI never try to plan my portraits, but I always have a feeling of the type of shot I want to capture.
    With Clint it was pretty easy. Whenever I hear his name I picture the narrowing of the eyes and thinning of the lips, usually just before drawing a gun from a holster or throwing a punch.
    This was the face I wanted.
    While I was setting up, Clint was at his piano playing a little bit of jazz and spirits where high. When I was ready he came over to my lighting set-up and presented himself to me with this lovely warm, calm, charming face. Not what I wanted.
    I exclaimed: "I am looking for Dirty Harry not Grandpa Walton."
    Clint had a bit of a laugh… but then in an instant narrowed his eyes. This is the result.
    Image copyrightANDY GOTTSAnd to go full circle, here is the picture that began it all, Stephen Fry in 1990, taken while he visited Norfolk College of Arts and Technology where Gotts was studying.
    Here are a few more stars who have been photographed by Andy Gotts:
    Image copyrightANDY GOTTSImage captionJulia RobertsImage copyrightANDY GOTTSImage captionRobert De NiroImage copyrightANDY GOTTSImage captionKate WinsletImage copyrightANDY GOTTSImage captionSidney PoitierImage copyrightANDY GOTTSImage captionScarlett JohanssonYou can see more work by Andy Gotts on his website and follow him on Instagram

  6. #381
    Isle of Discombobulation
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    IMAGE COPYRIGHTGAVIN WATSON
    image captionRaves took place in and around High Wycombe in 1989 - some outdoors and unlicensed in places such as Hazelmere, others in licensed venues including The Centre in Slough
    A photographer's pictures of the skinhead and rave scenes in and around his hometown are to form the basis of a new play about British youth tribes.

    Gavin Watson's images from the 1980s record his own journey from one scene to the other.

    "Replacing the skinhead scene with raves opened our minds - the world became a bigger place," said Watson.

    Theatre director Harry Burton said the "authenticity" in the photos could translate into a story.

    Watson, 54, photographed the skinhead scene in his native High Wycombe, Buckinghamshire, and then moved on to snapping the unlicensed rave scene at the end of the decade.

    IMAGE COPYRIGHTGAVIN WATSON
    image caption"This was way before parkour," said Watson, whose photographs from the early 1980s onwards have been collected in books including Skins and Just Kids
    The photos have been published in books including Skins and Raving '89.

    Having been a "skin" for about 10 years, Watson said: "It was always a classic look and I never got bored of it, but it was becoming stale and all about pubs. It was an older scene and wasn't gaining new blood."

    IMAGE COPYRIGHTGAVIN WATSON
    image captionSkinheads on the Micklefield estate in High Wycombe, where London-born Watson grew up
    Burton, 58, hopes the photographs can be incorporated into the as-yet-unnamed theatre production.

    "I was as wary of skinheads as most middle-class kids, but I was always switched on to ska and reggae - music was the link for me," said Burton, probably best known for his Channel 4 documentary Working with Pinter.

    "I'm a great admirer of the spirit of Gavin's work and the authenticity - the natural talent that he brought, his eye, the moment, the group, the feeling of family, the unforced nature of it.

    "The scene that Gavin photographed was a million miles from the cliché of racist, Nazi skinheads - his gang had black kids in it."

    IMAGE COPYRIGHTGAVIN WATSON
    image captionWatson, who used a Nikon FM 35mm camera, also photographed those who adopted the punk/Oi! look in the early 1980s "mainly in black and white, because colour processing was too expensive"
    IMAGE COPYRIGHTGAVIN WATSON/KAYLEIGH VICTORIA
    image captionThe photographer (pictured in the early 1980s and more recently) was a skinhead for 10 years before moving on to the rave scene
    IMAGE COPYRIGHTGAVIN WATSON
    image captionWatson's younger brother Nev (left) was also converted to the rave scene after years as a skinhead
    Watson said he was attending raves virtually every weekend in 1989, and he has been using lockdown to put together a new collection, this time mostly in colour, called Raving Too.

    You may also like:





    "What the rave scene did was wash the gang mentality away: the football tribes, the goths, skins, soul boys etc.," he said.

    "I'm in my 50s and a grandfather, so I'm out of it all now, but it seems to me rave was the last big change of any pop cultural significance where something goes mainstream and everyone, not just youngsters, is aware of it.

    "I want the play to be more universal and symbolic - I don't want it to be 100% about me. I don't want to watch my mistakes on stage."

    Burton said: "We think it's a one-man show and we're trying to create a story that has that mythological quality to it - there's a story to be told about that time that includes music, fashion, politics and rebellion."

    IMAGE COPYRIGHTGAVIN WATSON
    image captionAn outdoor rave in the Terriers area of High Wycombe, 1989. "There were no labels, no stars and no materialism - it was just people wanting a good time and feeling a bit rebellious," said Watson
    IMAGE COPYRIGHTGAVIN WATSON
    image captionQueuing to get into The Centre in Slough, Berkshire. "Some people were suspicious - everyone thought someone else might be an undercover copper in those days - but I'd been a skinhead for 10 years, so I wasn't worried about what people thought," said Watson
    IMAGE COPYRIGHTGAVIN WATSON
    image captionA rare colour photo from the 1989 rave scene - again at The Centre in Slough. "I hated carrying around this camera, because I wanted to rave, but it got me in free because the organisers wanted me to take images of their events for their flyers," said Watson
    IMAGE COPYRIGHTGAVIN WATSON
    image captionHigh Wycombe area rave organisers Mark Rickson and Gary Ellis. "I love this photo for the size of the mobile phone," said Watson
    IMAGE COPYRIGHTGAVIN WATSON
    image captionThe locations of raves were often kept secret until the night and attendees had to call special phone numbers to get directions, although some tickets came with instructions, such as this one Gavin Watson went to in Oxfordshire
    IMAGE COPYRIGHTGAVIN WATSON
    image captionPolice successfully shut down a rave at Colnbrook, near Slough
    IMAGE COPYRIGHTGAVIN WATSON
    image captionWatson attended and photographed the Freedom To Party rally in London in March 1990, which campaigned against government moves to restrict unlicensed dance events
    IMAGE COPYRIGHTGAVIN WATSON
    image captionA photograph that is due to appear in Gavin Watson's forthcoming book Raving Too - a follow-up to Raving '89
    IMAGE COPYRIGHTGAVIN WATSON
    image captionGavin and Neville Watson raving in 1989. "I did used to feel nostalgic for the 1989 period, but over time I've changed my mind because I think it killed all the differences that made things interesting," said Watson
    Burton, who is staging a webcast talk-through version of Harold Pinter's The Dwarfs on 25 September, said he and Watson had not idea whether their play would be staged before a live audience due to ongoing coronavirus restrictions.

    "It's a challenging time to mount a play - maybe we'll do it online," he said.

  7. #382
    Isle of Discombobulation
    Chittychangchang's Avatar
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    IMAGE COPYRIGHTJIM GROVER

    Throughout August, photographer Jim Grover photographed the people who sat on Tom's Bench on Clapham Common in London. The bench is in honour of the owner of Honest Tom's, a snack bar that has been there for 30 years, and who passed away last year.

    "Everyone who sat on Tom's Bench has been through what we've all encountered over the past few months," says Grover.

    "But the impact on individual lives has been so varied, from surprisingly rewarding to absolutely harrowing, and everything in between. Yvonne's moving story, on the last day of my month-long project, 31 August, put all the others into context. Hers was life-changing."

    Here we present a selection of the pictures of those he met, along with their thoughts on how the coronavirus has affected their lives.



    IMAGE COPYRIGHTJIM GROVER

    Dave owns Dave's Paws, a professional dog-walking, cat-feeding, and pet-sitting business. He has been coming to Honest Tom's for six years as it's on his daily dog-walking route. Today he is walking only Luna.

    "Our business has taken a massive hit. We lost a few dogs where clients lost their businesses, although we're still walking their dogs for free.

    "All our cat business went out of the window because, obviously, no-one is going away and leaving their cats."



    IMAGE COPYRIGHTJIM GROVER

    Matt comes here once or twice a week, and has been doing so for about three years. He's an electrician.

    "Covid put the company I work for completely out of business. I'm self-employed and they told us to sit at home until further notice. They're still shut down today.

    "I had no income and had to find other means of employment. I've got some work now, if you can call it work, for my uncle. It's still money but it's not what I was earning before."



    IMAGE COPYRIGHTJIM GROVER

    Holly is Tom's granddaughter. Her dad Simon now owns and runs Honest Tom's, where she works the afternoon shift, following in her grandad's footsteps.

    Holly started work in January, a few weeks before Tom's was forced to shut in March, the first time it has been closed in its 30-year history. She is also a graphic artist.

    "With Tom's being closed I was out of work for 10 weeks. It was a lovely holiday." She laughs, slightly sheepishly. "I spent all my time in the countryside, every day I was going on long walks in the fields.

    "And although I wasn't getting paid, I still had support around me. Everyone else seemed to be working harder… my partner [a police officer] was working much harder."



    IMAGE COPYRIGHTJIM GROVER

    This is the first time Zoe has sat on Tom's bench. She comes to the Common "pretty much every day" but stopped here today for a break having just taken up running. Zoe is an NHS hospital speech therapist.

    "I got stuck in Australia and unfortunately contracted the virus there. I went for a holiday for two weeks, but ended up there for two-and-a-half months.

    "It was pretty hard getting back. The air fares were expensive and they kept cancelling the flights, it was so unfortunate.

    "But my work was good over here, I work for the NHS. I am fine now. I am one of the lucky ones. Work is busy."



    IMAGE COPYRIGHTJIM GROVER

    Nadine (right) has worked at Honest Tom's for almost 27 years and fills the vase near Tom's bench with flowers each week to commemorate Tom. Susanne comes every Wednesday, attracted by the company, "the lovely food, the absolutely lovely ladies" in Honest Tom's, and the opportunity to give her dog a sausage.

    Susanne: "I have COPD [chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, a lung condition] and had to stay locked in for two months, by myself, with my dog.

    "It was horrible. I didn't speak to anybody. I didn't see none of my kids, my grandkids. It was depressing. Awful, because I like to get out."

    Nadine: "It stopped me working, with Tom's being shut. But I enjoyed being off, being indoors, getting things done, just me and Den [her husband].

    "It was hard not being able to see my kids and grandkids, but you've got Facetime and all that technology now.

    "But other than that, I quite enjoyed it. I am never off sick. I just have my holidays and it was nice to have a long break. It's hard being on your feet for six hours each day at my age."



    IMAGE COPYRIGHTJIM GROVER

    Martin and Maria are friends. Martin has been coming to Honest Tom's for 20 years and knew Tom. Maria has only been coming for six months but now comes a couple of times a week. She's currently not currently working but was previously a NHS receptionist. Martin is a carpenter, although he is not doing so much at the moment having recently lost his wife to cancer.

    Martin: "It didn't affect me a Iot at the beginning, more now at the end with all the uncertainty. It didn't affect me directly, thank goodness."

    Maria: "Again, not at the beginning, but now it's all the uncertainty and the illegal raves going on on the Common. I'm worried about that. We were here late last night at 10 o'clock and there were two raves going on. There was no social distancing, the police had no-one to send."



    IMAGE COPYRIGHTJIM GROVER

    Junior (left) has been coming to Honest Tom's for more than 10 years. He rides over from Bromley on his motorbike as often as he can, mainly to meet up with his friend Emin. For 27 years, Junior ran his own car body repair business, before being injured in an accident which has left him with long-term illness.

    Junior: "Because I am trying to be careful, everything has been fine."

    Emin: "It hasn't really affected me. This place was closed for seven weeks, so I missed the people up here.

    "Other than that, it wasn't too bad. I had Sheila [his wife] to keep me company. I know a couple of people who got ill, but they came through it all right."



    IMAGE COPYRIGHTJIM GROVER

    Tony and Michaela started to come to Honest Tom's six months ago, to meet up with their friends. They both now come almost every day. Tony does motorbike deliveries for a vegan restaurant. Michaela is studying engineering at university and just got a First in some pre-return exams.

    Tony: "I got kept in lockdown, like everyone else, and was out of work. I'm back at work now.

    "It's not like normal life, you're under control… like when you're younger and you're under control by your parents. I've missed my freedom. I don't like it."

    Michaela: "Not really, university stopped for a bit but I didn't mind."



    IMAGE COPYRIGHTJIM GROVER

    Tony is a local black-cab driver, he's come for breakfast after a night shift. He can remember Tom's opening 30 years ago, and has been a regular for the last 15 years or so, stopping to grab a cup of tea or a bite to eat. He now comes most days if he's working, attracted by a decent cup of tea and the sense of community amongst the regulars. He's made many friends here.

    "It's been terrible, the work has completely gone.

    I'm self-employed, the government money has helped out a lot. The business is still as bad now, as the work hasn't picked up at all."



    IMAGE COPYRIGHTJIM GROVER

    The final chapter in this month-long project was a moving encounter with Yvonne, whose experiences put all the others' into context.

    Yvonne has been coming to Honest Tom's for "donkey's years", including when it was Tom working on his own and a much smaller snack wagon. She comes two or three times a week as she lives close by.

    Her husband was one of the many killed by the virus.

    "He collapsed at home and it took a couple of hours for the ambulance to come. We managed to get him to St George's [hospital] and they kept him in there.

    "He just couldn't walk, he was in there a couple of weeks and then he caught this virus there and he died. And my two daughters and I… we couldn't see him… no contact… we couldn't even say goodbye.

    "He died in the beginning of April and we couldn't bury him until May.

    "And now I am on my own. It was a nightmare. It's still a nightmare."

  8. #383
    Hansum Man! panama hat's Avatar
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    ^ not quite sure what to say . . . thought-provoking for sure

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