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    Egypt's military rulers ignored pleas from US as mob attacked Israeli embassy

    Egypt's military leaders have been accused of turning a blind eye to the mob attack on Israel's Cairo embassy at the weekend as it emerged that they ignored repeated telephone calls from the Obama administration.

    Egyptian army soldiers guard the Israeli embassy in Cairo Photo: REUTERS/Amr Abdallah Dalsh


    By Adrian Blomfield, Jerusalem

    11:34PM BST 11 Sep 2011
    447 Comments


    With six Israeli security guards fending off an angry mob rampaging through the mission, Leon Panetta, the US defence secretary, tried for two hours to get hold of Field Marshal Hussein Tantawi, Egypt's de facto head of state, to demand an immediate rescue operation.

    Aides told Mr Panetta that the general could not be found, Israeli officials were quoted as saying. The response prompted fury in Washington, and threats of US retribution. Field Marshal Tantawi's mysterious disappearance intensified speculation that Egypt's generals had deliberately failed to protect the embassy for political gain.

    The armed forces, which are running Egypt until a civilian government is elected at the end of the year, are thought to be desperate to retain the political influence and financial privileges they enjoyed under President Hosni Mubarak, who was toppled by protests in February.

    Officials in Israel, as well as a number of political activists in Cairo, have claimed that Field Marshal Tantawi turned down an opportunity to rein in the violence at the embassy in order to prove that, without a strong army, Egypt would descend into violence and anarchy.

    Israel was forced to send military aircraft to Cairo to evacuate its ambassador and more than 80 diplomats after a mob, angered by the killing of three Egyptian border guards by Israeli forces last month, laid siege to the embassy. As the Egyptian police and army stood by, unwilling or unable to intervene, the rioters broke through the mission's defences and ransacked the building. The incident has plunged relations between Israel and its oldest Arab ally deep into crisis.

    Fresh details disclosed yesterday showed how narrowly an even more serious incident was averted. Both Israel and America appeared concerned that the indecent could spiral into a repeat of the US embassy siege in Tehran after the Iranian revolution of 1979, when 42 US diplomats were held hostage for 444 days.

    Mr Panetta was able to reach Field Marshal Tantawi shortly after one o'clock on Saturday morning, warning the Egyptian of "serious consequences" if any of the Israelis was killed.
    Meanwhile, Benjamin Netanyahu, the Israeli prime minister, kept two telephone lines open, one to the White House and the other to the embassy in Cairo, according to Israeli officials.
    From inside the building a guard identified only as Jonathan told the prime minister that the mob had smashed its way through two of three doors to the embassy's strong room, inside which the six guards had barricaded themselves.
    Jonathan, who had sent a text message to his wife that simply read "I love you", appeared to be preparing for the worst. He told Mr Netanyahu: "If something happens to me, I ask that you contact my mother and you inform her face to face."
    The six men were rescued by Egyptian commandos at the last moment. Ordered to don Arab robes, they were spirited out of the building and later flown out of the country on an Israeli military aircraft.
    Yesterday, with the deserted embassy heavily guarded, both Egypt and Israel sought to play down tensions. Neither country wants to undermine a peace deal, signed in 1979, that has proved lucrative for Egypt in terms of US military aid and vital to Israel's security in what remains a hostile region. "We will continue to preserve the peace with Egypt," Mr Netanyahu said. "It is an interest of both countries."
    Israeli officials also acknowledged the country's growing isolation in the region just a week after Turkey expelled its ambassador to Ankara in a row over last year's botched raid on a Gaza-bound aid flotilla during which nine Turkish activists were killed.


    Egypt's military rulers ignored pleas from US as mob attacked Israeli embassy - Telegraph

  2. #2
    loob lor geezer
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bangyai View Post

    The six men were rescued by Egyptian commandos at the last moment. Ordered to don Arab robes, they were spirited out of the building and later flown out of the country on an Israeli military aircraft.
    Alls well that ends well ....... feel the love.

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    With six Israeli security guards fending off an angry mob rampaging through the mission, Leon Panetta, the US defence secretary, tried for two hours to get hold of Field Marshal Hussein Tantawi, Egypt's de facto head of state, to demand an immediate rescue operation.

    Aides told Mr Panetta that the general could not be found, Israeli officials were quoted as saying. The response prompted fury in Washington, and threats of US retribution.
    Now why the US have to retaliate when the attack was on the Israeli embassy?

    Oh, I know, because the good old USA is ISRAEL'S BITCH.


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    Quote Originally Posted by harrybarracuda View Post
    With six Israeli security guards fending off an angry mob rampaging through the mission, Leon Panetta, the US defence secretary, tried for two hours to get hold of Field Marshal Hussein Tantawi, Egypt's de facto head of state, to demand an immediate rescue operation.

    Aides told Mr Panetta that the general could not be found, Israeli officials were quoted as saying. The response prompted fury in Washington, and threats of US retribution.
    Now why the US have to retaliate when the attack was on the Israeli embassy?

    Oh, I know, because the good old USA is ISRAEL'S BITCH.

    Yes, but they seem to own Europe too. At least in America calling a Kike a Kike is simply rude and not a serious crime like it is in some idiot countries....not yet anyway.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bangyai
    they ignored repeated telephone calls from the Obama administration.
    Judging by the state of the US economy they were probably reverse charge calls.

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    the US is really at the mercy of Israel,

    Egypt is no longer Israel bitch, and now they are surrounded by angry neighbors

    hopefully the destruction of Israel, as predicted by ancient scriptures, will happen again

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    What did the Egyptian Intelligence find in the Cairo Embassy? Were the disguised ordered to eat ham sandwiches as a cover?

    Quote Originally Posted by Bangyai
    Israeli officials also acknowledged the country's growing isolation in the region
    Yes just a few, surrounded by emboldened, angry Arabs and about to be humiliated when the other 160+ world countries vote for Palestinian statehood. The US will not vote for the statehood but will the just abstain, rather than play their god given veto.
    A tray full of GOLD is not worth a moment in time.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rueters
    Israeli officials also acknowledged the country's growing isolation in the region
    They've always been isolated in the region; whats new?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Butterfly View Post
    the US is really at the mercy of Israel,

    Egypt is no longer Israel bitch, and now they are surrounded by angry neighbors

    hopefully the destruction of Israel, as predicted by ancient scriptures, will happen again
    The ancient scriptures are the problem, particularly that drivel from the 7th century. The world needs less superstition and more science.

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    Israeli officials also acknowledged the country's growing isolation in the region just a week after Turkey expelled its ambassador to Ankara in a row over last year's botched raid on a Gaza-bound aid flotilla during which nine Turkish activists were killed.


    Yes, but they are too stupidly arrogant to ever realize their actions are repulsive to the World and change. The old Holocaust excuse is as worn out. With it's nuclear weapons and control of America, Israel is the greatest threat to the World.

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    Israel watches its old alliances crumble

    The overthrow of President Mubarak in Egypt, the estrangement of Turkey and a UN vote on Palestinian statehood combine to make an intractable set of problems.



    Egyptian demonstrators burn a flag outside the Israeli embassy in Cairo Photo: APAimages / Rex Features

    By Adrian Blomfield

    8:34PM BST 12 Sep 2011

    Secluded in an emergency operations bunker, long after darkness had fallen to mark the start of the Sabbath last Friday, Israel’s most powerful men had become convinced that history was about to repeat itself.

    Hundreds of miles away, six intelligence officers, detailed to protect Israel’s embassy in Cairo, had barricaded themselves in the building’s strongroom. A mob of hammer-wielding Egyptians were closing in. The rioters had already broken down two of the strongroom’s doors and were now hammering on the third. Three of the Israelis drew their guns, preparing for a last stand.

    Speaking to Benjamin Netanyahu, the Israeli prime minister who had been patched through on a secure line, the most senior of the men, identified only as Jonathan, asked his commander-in-chief to deliver news of his capture or death to his wife in person, rather than by telephone.

    For all involved, as Israeli officials later recounted, the drama threatened to become a reprise of the 1979 Iran hostage crisis, when 52 US diplomats were held captive for 444 days after an Islamist mob had stormed the American mission in Tehran.

    This time, the most feared outcome was averted – thanks to the intervention of the White House. Facing American threats of dire retribution if any of the Israelis was harmed, Egypt’s military rulers dispatched a team of commandos to rescue the trapped men, a mission completed in the nick of time.

    In the wake of the incident, Egypt and Israel have worked hard to avert a full-scale diplomatic crisis, with both states emphasising their commitment to the peace treaty they signed in the same year the Shah fell. Even so, in Israel the mood was one of relief rather than jubilation. There is a growing conviction that disaster has merely been postponed rather than resolved.

    Since the tiny state was founded in 1948, Israel has always regarded itself as a vulnerable bastion of civilisation in a hostile region bent on its destruction – “a villa in the jungle”, as Ehud Barak, the Israeli defence minister, has put it. But in recent years, Mr Barak’s crude metaphor had seemed less apposite, even as Israel’s interminable conflict with the Palestinians ground on unresolved. Indeed, the jungle seemed to be pushed back in places and tamed in others.
    Israel has been at peace with Egypt, its oldest Arab ally, since Jimmy Carter’s triumphant summit at Camp David paved the way for a treaty that has been in many ways the bedrock of the country’s security, guaranteeing peace on its remote southern border. Jordan eventually followed suit, signing a peace treaty of its own, while Turkey strengthened another vital alliance, giving Israel the support of a heavy-hitting Muslim power in the region.
    The rest of the Arab world still seemed implacable, but one by one its dictators, despite the anger of their populations, found it pragmatic to reach an accommodation of sorts with Israel, tolerating the interloper in their midst even if not accepting it. Even Syria, which technically remains at war with Israel, found it preferable to keep the peace despite the continued Israeli occupation of the Golan Heights, captured during the Six Day War of 1967.
    But, with alarming speed, all these gains now seem in jeopardy, leaving Israel terrified that the jungle is creeping back once more. This month has already proved one of the most nettlesome in Israel’s recent history – with worse to come before it is over, as the Palestinian leadership heads to the United Nations with a potentially explosive application for statehood.
    One vital friendship seems already to be over. At the beginning of the month, Turkey, a crucial military and commercial ally, announced the expulsion of the Israeli ambassador, a downgrading of diplomatic relations and a suspension of defence ties. The crisis has been brewing for a long time, even before Israeli forces killed nine Turkish activists in a botched raid on a Gaza-bound aid flotilla last year.
    Turkey’s sanctions were ostensibly the result of Mr Netanyahu’s refusal to apologise for the incident, which outraged many ordinary Turks. But other factors are at play as well. Tired of the European Union’s rejection of his advances, Recep Tayyip Erdogan, Turkey’s mildly Islamist prime minister, is attempting to regain some of his country’s influence in the Ottoman Empire’s old Arab fiefs. By presenting himself as the champion of the Palestinians’ plight, particularly in Gaza, he is tapping into one of the most emotive issues in the Arab world and winning huge popularity as a result.
    Mr Netanyahu has come under fire in some Israeli quarters for some mutton-headed diplomacy that has allowed Turkey to slip away. Some of his hawkish ministers have indulged in ritual humiliation of Turkish diplomats and even Mr Netanyahu has been guilty of some ostentatious grandstanding.
    Lessons appear to have been learnt with Egypt, but an end to the embassy crisis may not be enough to salvage ties entirely. Egypt’s generals, heading a transitional government until civilian elections at the end of the year, are desperate to maintain the cordial relationship forged by Hosni Mubarak. Last month, they chose to make only a muted protest when Israeli forces, chasing suspected militants behind a deadly attack near the frontier, inadvertently shot dead at least three Egyptian border guards.
    But both the generals and Israel appear to have misread the public mood in Egypt. Egyptians were long incensed by the manner in which Mr Mubarak aided Israel in enforcing a blockade with Gaza by sealing the territory’s border with Egypt’s Sinai Peninsula. The military leadership’s perceived quiescence in the face of another Israeli “provocation” led to protests outside the Israeli embassy, culminating in its ransacking on Friday night.
    For a long time, the generals ordered the army to stand by as the violence escalated, fearing that popular anger might rebound on them if they were seen once more to be defending Israeli interests – and potentially killing more Egyptians in the process. In the end, three Egyptian protesters were killed, and the generals’ worst fears could still be realised, with public anger in Cairo growing.
    The certainties of the dictatorial era in the Arab world on which Israel so depended are fading. Mr Mubarak and his fellow tyrants could determine policy towards the Jewish state without consulting their browbeaten people; the next generation of leaders will have no choice but to take into consideration their views.
    Even as Israel grapples with the situation in Egypt, a fresh crisis – one of possibly even greater magnitude – is about to wash over the Netanyahu government, which could also cause serious damage to Washington’s already weakened standing in the region.
    Ignoring vocal US opposition, the Palestinian leadership has announced it will press ahead with a bid for statehood recognition at the United Nations when the General Assembly convenes next week. Both Israel and the United States denounce the move as a unilateral step that will undermine the Middle East peace process, perhaps fatally.
    President Barack Obama has already signalled his determination to wield the American veto if the application is brought before the Security Council, scuppering any chances of the state of Palestine being given full membership of the UN. That threat has failed to deter the Palestinians, who could seek recognition instead from the General Assembly, which has the power to make Palestine a non-voting member of the UN . For the Israelis, such an outcome is seen as disastrous because it could pave the way for the Palestinians to pursue them in international courts .
    The United States has threatened Mahmoud Abbas, the Palestinian leader, with a reduction in American aid if he persists with his application. But such a move could be worse news for Israel. Without US financing, the Palestinian Authority could go bankrupt, forcing itself to dissolve and hand full control of the West Bank back to Israel. The prospect of Israeli troops returning to Palestinian cities is relished by no one in Israel .
    Protests against the occupation could erupt anyway, leading to demonstrations in sympathy elsewhere in the Arab world, and increasing the pressure on Egypt and Jordan, Israel’s only other ally in the region, to downgrade or even sever relations.
    The anger of the street could also be turned against the United States. Mr Obama was once hailed as a hero for standing up to Israel and demanding a halt to Jewish settlement construction in the West Bank. But, facing a backlash from the pro-Israeli lobby at home, he later vetoed a Security Council resolution condemning Israel’s settlement building.
    A second veto, or a reduction in Palestinian aid, would only confirm in the eyes of many that the United States – just like Israel – is the enemy of the Arab people and their aspirations.

    Israel watches its old alliances crumble - Telegraph

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    Egypt declares Camp David accords with Israel 'not a sacred thing'

    Egypt's prime minister triggered angry consternation in Israel on Thursday after declaring that the historic Camp David accords underpinning peace between the two countries were "not a sacred thing".


    Egyptian President Anwar Sadat, left, and Israeli Prime Minister Menachem Begin, embrace as US President Jimmy Carter applauds during a White House announcement of a Middle East peace agreement reached at the Camp David Summit earlier that year in 1978 Photo: AP
    By Adrian Blomfield, Tel Aviv

    9:28PM BST 15 Sep 2011

    Dramatically heightening tensions during an increasingly volatile time in Israel's relations with the Arab world, Essam Sharaf's suggestions that the 32-year treaty could be revised prompted disbelief in the Jewish state.

    "The Camp David agreement is not a sacred thing and is always open to discussion with what would benefit the region and the case of fair peace," Mr Sharaf told Turkish television. "We could make a change if needed."

    Coming just days after an angry mob stormed the Israeli embassy in Cairo, Israeli officials said they were staggered more by the timing of Mr Sharaf's comments than their actual content. "Less than a week ago, we had the problem with the embassy," an Israeli official said. "I don't think a responsible prime minister should say things like that."

    Reeling from a noxious diplomatic row with Turkey and fearing that an expected Palestinian bid for statehood at the UN next week will heighten its growing sense of isolation.

    On Thursday, Recep Tayyip Erdogan, the Turkish prime minister, raised the stakes by repeating his intention to deploy warships in the Mediterranean to challenge Israeli "aggression".

    "Israel cannot do whatever it wants in the eastern Mediterranean," he said. "They will see what our decision will be on this subject. Our navy attack ships can be there at any moment."

    Israel has spoken of its determination to defuse tensions with Egypt in the wake of last week's embassy raid.
    Until yesterday, Egypt's transitional military leadership had responded in kind, insisting that it wanted to uphold the Camp David accords, whose historic agreement in 1978 is widely seen as ending the cycle of Israeli-Arab wars that erupted in the preceding 30 years.
    But, in the wake of the popular revolution that overthrew Hosni Mubarak, the former president, in February, Egypt's present crop of transitional leaders have been forced to take into account the view of ordinary Egyptians, many of whom remain deeply suspicious of Israel. Mr Mubarak, by contrast, assiduously upheld the treaty with Israel, even assisting in imposing an Israeli blockade on the Gaza Strip, which has a border with Egypt.
    Public anger towards the Jewish state mounted after Israeli troops in pursuit of suspected militants inadvertently shot dead five Egyptian border guards, leading to last Friday's riot at the embassy.
    In the aftermath of the revolution, a number of civilian politicians likely to contest presidential elections in Egypt at the end of the year have said they want to revise "humiliating" aspects of the treaty with Israel.
    In particular, they want the right to take fuller economic and military control of the Sinai region, which Israel occupied after the Six Day War of 1967 but handed back after the peace treaty of 1979, signed a year after the meeting at Camp David brokered by then US president Jimmy Carter.
    Israeli officials in private say such demands are not unreasonable, and could even be beneficial given the growing lawlessness of the Sinai region. But the phrasing of Mr Sharaf's comments, particularly that the treaty is not "scared", is seen as incendiary.
    "Others who have said this kind of thing have been presidential candidates but this is the prime minister – that is what is disturbing," the Israeli official said. "He should be more careful."
    By making his comments to Turkish television, Mr Sharaf appeared to be attempting to burnish his populist credentials.
    He spoke just after Prime Minister Erdogan had completed a visit to Egypt.
    Seeking to present himself as a champion of the Palestinian cause, a stance that has won him huge popularity in the Arab world, Mr Erdogan has kept up a steady stream of invective against Israel in recent days.
    Earlier this month he expelled Israel's ambassador to Turkey, downgraded diplomatic relations and suspended defence ties after Israel refused to apologise for killing nine Turkish nationals during its botched raid on a Gaza-bound aid flotilla last year.
    Increasing Israel's sense of vulnerability, a last-ditch US bid to prevent the Palestinian Authority from making a controversial bid for statehood appeared to have failed yesterday, setting the stage for a major diplomatic showdown at the United Nations next week.
    Palestinian officials signalled their determination to defy stiff opposition from Washington by pressing ahead with a formal application for UN membership after the annual session of the General Assembly opens in New York on Monday.
    With Israel threatening "harsh and grave consequences" if the bid goes ahead, President Barack Obama sent his closest Middle East advisers, Dennis Ross and David Hale, to the West Bank to persuade Mahmoud Abbas, the president of the Palestinian Authority, to back down.
    But aides in the Palestinian city of Ramallah said that, although he would hear the Americans out, Mr Abbas would not be dissuaded from pursuing a cause seen as vital to his political survival. The Palestinian leader is due to address the General Assembly next Friday, Sept 23rd.
    "We will see if anyone carries with him or her any credible offer that will allow us to look into it seriously and to be discussed win the Palestinian leadership," said Riyad al-Malki, the Palestinian foreign minister. "Otherwise, on the 23rd at 12.30, the president will submit the application."


    Egypt declares Camp David accords with Israel 'not a sacred thing' - Telegraph

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    Israel's problems are of it's own making. If they can't see the bluddy obvious and get down to making a deal, it's difficult for me to have sympathy for them.

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    Having said that a naval battle featuring the might of the Turkish Navy taking on the yids would be quite a sight to behold.

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    Quote Originally Posted by harrybarracuda View Post
    Having said that a naval battle featuring the might of the Turkish Navy taking on the yids would be quite a sight to behold.
    It would be NATO v Israel. That would be an interesting scenario. US fighters v EU fighters, Israeli electronics v US electronics.

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