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  1. #1
    Thailand Expat Hampsha's Avatar
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    Anonymous Threatens US Congress Over Copyright




    Anonymous threatens Congress over copyright bill







    Hackers from the group Anonymous released a video on the Web this week in which the collective calls out Congress for a controversial new bill that could put Internet users in prison for streaming videos online.


    Should S.978 be put on the books, streaming copyrighted material on the Web could land a person in jail for up to five years in addition to costing thousands of dollars in fines. The video released from Anonymous specifically challenges how the law would punish video game users for sharing their own game play on the Web, which the hackers say is a form of censorship and a denial of the free flow of information.


    Anonymous also notes that even providing a link to copyrighted content could cause users to wind up with legal woes and says that the legislation is a “tyrannical scheme” courtesy of Congress. The bill was introduced to the Senate in May of this year but has not made it to the voting room floor yet. The official description for S. 978 reads that the bill is being brought before lawmakers “To amend the criminal penalty provision for criminal infringement of a copyright, and for other purposes.”

    Minnesota Democratic Senator Amy Klobuchar is a co-sponsor of the bill, and she says that the legislation is not as harsh as weary Web users seem to think. "The bill is not intended nor does it allow law enforcement to prosecute people who may stream videos and other copyrighted works to their friends without intending to profit from the work of the copyright owner," Klobuchar said at a Senate Judiciary Committee meeting in June. "It also does not allow prosecutors to go after individuals that innocently post links on their blogs to copyrighted protected works."

    It could, however, cause felony charges if lawmakers seem to think that sharing content causes the copyright owner to miss out on money they could be making.
    Anonymous hackers in Germany have already gone after authorities overseas for similar acts they consider censorship. On Monday Anonymous disabled the website of GEMA, a German watchdog that keeps an eye open for infringement of copyrighted music. Earlier this year hacktivists launched a denial-of-service attack on their site.


    Congress isn’t exactly a new target for Anonymous either. In the past, hacktivists associated with the collective infiltrated the websites for the US Senate. Recently the group also targeted the Bay Area Rapid Transit (BART) system in San Francisco over murders carried out by transit cops.

    https://rt.com/usa/news/anonymous-co...ight-bill-159/





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    The clip is like something. What will this lead to? Seems the hackers are still there. I watched the Wikileaks documentary from the net. It was interesting but you don't hear too much from them these days. I wonder how many major groups there are like these out there?

  2. #2
    I am in Jail

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    Quote Originally Posted by Hampsha
    Congress isn’t exactly a new target for Anonymous either. In the past, hacktivists associated with the collective infiltrated the websites for the US Senate. Recently the group also targeted the Bay Area Rapid Transit (BART) system in San Francisco over murders carried out by transit cops.
    Generally speaking many members of society are tired, pissed off, disillusioned and sick to the back teeth of greedy politicians and corporate fat pigs using the laws to suit themselves and their vested interests.

    I'm not promoting or agreeing with copyright theft but as usual the Internet and free speech are under attack from greedy politicians and corporate fat pigs!

  3. #3
    Thailand Expat Hampsha's Avatar
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    Sure seems to be that way. It's a dog and dog world well at least the other dogs will kick you off your land and take what little you have. The world could be a better place.

    As for copyright, its hard for developing countries to educate their people if they have to buy legal versions of books. The 'developed' countries are happy to provide free bibles but after that its all a bit too expensive. Even Thailand's top schools use copied books and pirated CDs and DVDs in the classroom. I work out in the countryside at a post-secondary school and everything we use is copied. It would be great for the kids to have real books but the money just isn't there.

    As an American, when I hear of piracy it bothers me but on the otherhand, the mass media pushes the media into the heads of those around the world stimulating curiousity or desire for it. It's like teasing a baby with a candy and not giving it to them. That baby will try to get it. The lack of access is also a denial of knowledge. Knowledge comes in different forms, it doesn't just have to be from a book or educational video. The fun Hollywoood movies also contain ideas that have shaped the world. Denying this information is just wrong. Even the US government probably has watched or used pirated materials at time throughout history. Plus there is the fact that many countries around the world have been directly affected by the actions of other countries through war and other actions and in many cases people are still suffering or affected from those events today. Would denying a documentary on Agent Orange to the people of Vietnam be a positive thing? Movies that are written about certain parts of the world yet created and available only to the people from other countries who have money to watch them is just wrong. For example, a movie about Brazil should be available to its people, all its people. A movie like that about the ethnic killing in central Africa should be accessible since it is about their country and their people.

    Anyways, I just feel that this isn't a simple issue. Information is important. People need access to it and all things should be considered.

  4. #4
    Elite Mumbler
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hampsha
    Even the US government probably has watched or used pirated materials at time throughout history.
    Doubt it. They would be more likely to give the contract for the materials to friends of theirs, at triple the price.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Hampsha View Post
    The 'developed' countries are happy to provide free bibles but after that its all a bit too expensive.
    Very good post Hampsha. The baby/candy analogy is especially accurate. Television and social media have introduced the world's underprivileged to a different life and they want it. Either they will cross borders or jump into boats to get it, or we can show them how to create it for themselves. Give a man a fish.....

    I have often wondered how much more people would benefit if they were given modern educational material instead of a 2,000 year old novel.
    Last edited by Thormaturge; 27-08-2011 at 07:52 AM.
    I see fish. They are everywhere. They don't know they are fish.

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    It is an amendment to USC 2319, Title 18, that would make unauthorized streaming of copyrighted material for the purpose of "commercial advantage or personal financial gain", a felony (under current law, unauthorized streaming is only a misdemeanor). The penalty could include up to five years of prison-time. It defines illegal streaming as streaming ten or more times in a 180 day period. Furthermore, the value of the illegally streamed material would have to be greater than $2,500, or the licensing fees would have to be over $5,000.

    A true example of what corporate whores politicians are, but not quite as bad as it initially sounded, since it's limited to commercial gain. The FBI is not going to kick in your door because your child watched the Little Mermaid on line. (Well not yet anyway).

  7. #7
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    Not yet anyway... indeed. The full power of law doesn't become apparent until it is too late. Well done to the 'hacktivists' for highlighting it, and let's hope they can derail it.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hampsha
    developing countries to educate their people if they have to buy legal versions of books
    Many schools provide photocopy handouts and not textbooks in the developed world.

    Quote Originally Posted by Hampsha
    Even the US government probably has watched or used pirated materials
    It's called propaganda and not just the US does it.

    Quote Originally Posted by Hampsha
    A movie like that about the ethnic killing in
    ,...... Isn't that Hollywoods role?

  9. #9
    Thailand Expat Hampsha's Avatar
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    Either way by the sheet or the book, copies are illegal if you don't pay royalties. Mostly its the unis that are copying. There are some books in lower education.


    People just should have access to information. We create our stupid laws but we constantly break them. The bible itself is pirated in a way. So many ancient scripts have been reproduce to allow people to learn.


    When it comes to catch the online pirated goods, a crime must be commited. It's kind of like a cop trying out the cocaine in order to see if it is in fact cocaine. You have to look at or download the porn, movies, songs, and files and whatever else there might be to verify its legit.


    Don't get me wrong I am for some controls but I do think access to information is important. Before they go off arresting people for downloading material which might be educational or even entertainingm they should arrest all the people who sign up to websites with false names. Isn't this a more important problem to be solved?

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