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Thread: British GP

  1. #1
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    British GP in GMC charge

    I sincerely hope that the nurses who chose to grass this rather decent bloke up fuck off back to Tesco shelf stacking where they belong.

    I'd like to think if I was in the patient's situation I'd be able to tip a wink at the doctor to slip a bit extra in.

    He's not exactly Harold Shipman is he?

    GP injected man to 'hasten death'

    By Paul Keaveny

    Wednesday, 3 August 2011





    A "tired and stressed" doctor administered a dangerously high dose of diamorphine to a terminally-ill patient so he could "die in peace", a medical disciplinary panel was told.
    Dr William Lloyd Bassett allegedly injected around 10 times the accepted amount of the drug into a 65-year-old man who was suffering from terminal lung cancer.
    The General Medical Council disciplinary panel was told today that Dr Bassett, who works as a general medical practitioner in Brown Clee Medical Practice in Shropshire, carried out his final treatment on "Patient A" on May 29 2009.
    Peter Atherton, counsel for the GMC, said: "The GMC alleges that Dr Bassett administered a dangerously high dose of diamorphine with the intent of hastening the patient's death."
    Mr Atherton said that at the time of the incident, Dr Bassett was "highly regarded" by his colleagues and patients and had a particular interest in palliative care.
    At around 1pm on May 29, Dr Bassett made his fourth visit to Patient A in 24 hours.
    The patient was very "unsettled and frightened" by his illness, the hearing was told.
    Mr Atherton said the doctor administered 100mg of diamorphine to the patient.
    The hearing heard that in his notes Dr Bassett said it was "large dose but he is dying and I would like him to die in peace".
    Later in his notes, the doctor described telling the family about what he had done.
    He said they discussed the high dose of morphine and were "told honestly what morphine did, ie) hasten death".
    The notes also said: "Family accepts this."
    The nurses who were caring for the patient reported the incident, as they believed it was a "serious departure" from the end of life care standards.
    The matter was reported to West Mercia Police and on June 12, 2009, Dr Bassett gave police a prepared statement in which he said he had injected the full dose of 100mg of diamorphine to the patient "accidentally" due to the fact he was "struggling".
    He said he had not intended to inject the full contents of the syringe and he accepted he did not give any thought to trying to reverse the effects of the overdose but that he believed what had happened was "in the best interests" of the patient.
    Mr Atherton added: "He said in hindsight he was wrong and he should have taken some action to reverse the effects.
    "He said it was not his intent to cause the patient's death and that it was caused by stress and tiredness and that he had allowed his own emotions to affect his decision making."
    The GMC called in an expert to review the evidence who found that the 100mg administered was between six and 10 times greater than he would have expected to see.
    The expert also said Dr Bassett carried out the injection "at a time when his judgment was affected by a distressed patient and his family, stress from overwork and tiredness due to an interrupted night's sleep on the previous night".
    "His actions fall significantly below the standard accepted of a reasonably competent general practitioner," the expert said.
    The hearing was told that Patient A's family have no grievance with Dr Bassett and do not wish to take part in the GMC proceedings.
    The doctor accepts he administered 100mg of diamorphine, that he took no action to reverse it, and that his actions put the patient at risk of respiratory failure.
    But he denies he did it to hasten the patient's death.
    The GMC alleges his fitness to practise is impaired because of his misconduct.
    The hearing is scheduled to last three days.
    Last edited by harrybarracuda; 04-08-2011 at 02:16 AM. Reason: I fucked up

  2. #2
    Member ribblerat's Avatar
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    Harry never mind them stacking shelves at Tesco, but hopefully one day in the future when they have a tit full of Cancer cells that have migrated to other organs..
    They may think back about this situation when they are writhing in pain begging for more morphine...

  3. #3
    Member Albert Shagnasty's Avatar
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    giving a terminally ill lung cancer patient a hit of smack so strong that the heart stops beating and they go to heaven in a ferrari should be rewarded with a nobel peace prize.

  4. #4
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    I was there when my brother died of cancer. And I am almost certain the same happened with him. I saw the nurse increasing the speed of the morphine drip several times. It saved him and his wife maybe a few days of agony. I am not sure she was aware of it too as I preferred back then not to talk about it.

    If I regret anything then that I was not able to talk to him until the moment he died. I tried several times but choked and could not. He could not speak but he was still able to understand.

    Cudos to any doctor who does it.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by harrybarracuda
    The nurses who were caring for the patient reported the incident, as they believed it was a "serious departure" from the end of life care standards.
    I've recently spent time in a high dependancy ward and was bedded next to a man who was dying in the most horrendous pain, he spent his last three days either coughing uncontrollably or crying out in pain, this was constant and without a break for his last 72hrs. I couldn't for the life of me understand how he could be left to die in such pain, the notion of "care" at the end if life seemed to be completely absent, he was simply told that his morphine couldn't be upped any more as it would compromise his lungs ability to function and shut them down, which I thought the most ironic statement I'd ever heard. I appreciate that the hands if the medical staff are tied by our shitty laws and I make no critsysm of the hospital staff themselves as they were all without exception 100% professional and compassionate in their care of everyone of us in there, they just had no other alternative than to let him suffer, our present understanding of sanctity of human life in such horrendous circumstances seems to be totally inadequate and desperately needs updating.


    Quote Originally Posted by harrybarracuda
    "His actions fall significantly below the standard accepted of a reasonably competent general practitioner," the expert said.
    A prime example of what's wrong with the law as it now stands, this man knows what happened was the best for all concerned but has to say this to protect himself, just as the nurses who reported him had to do so to protect themselves from being implicated and punished by the law.
    There is something very badly wrong with a society that allows people die in a way that takes away all dignity and replaces it with pain.
    Sadly I can't see anything changing soon.

  6. #6
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    Funnily enough slipping a fatal dose of diamorphine was considered the right thing to do back in the day, and was never an issue until the fucking Jesus Wheezers with their "sanctity of life" horseshit were given a voice.

    If I'm ever in that position, I'll be nicking the stuff and saving it up for the right time.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by harrybarracuda
    I'll be nicking the stuff and saving it up for the right time.
    I remember thinking something very similar myself

  8. #8
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    Good post stinky.

    Quote Originally Posted by harrybarracuda
    If I'm ever in that position, I'll be nicking the stuff and saving it up for the right time.
    You may not be in the position to take it come the time. But I appreciate the sentiment. I don't consider suicide lightly but people dying in pain needlessly is a shame.

  9. #9
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    I keep thinking this tread is about Formula 1

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Moonraker View Post
    I keep thinking this tread is about Formula 1
    Your Freudian slip is showing.



    Added: Fair comment, fixed it.
    Last edited by harrybarracuda; 04-08-2011 at 02:16 AM.

  11. #11
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    Ha, whoops.

    Well done Harry, very slick

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